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I have a jean...(The Ultimate Jean Thread For Beginners) - ask questions here.

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by whodini, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. Arms_Akimbo

    Arms_Akimbo Senior member

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    this
    Are you replying to the last line?
     


  2. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    No, I'm agreeing with his post
     


  3. Ge Fuzz

    Ge Fuzz Senior member

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    I only soak unsanforized denim because if you don't all the cool wear marks will not line up after soaking. They shrink so much the knees will be on the thighs etc; That would certainly look goofy no? Kind of like wearing someone elses well worn jeans.

    another reason may be if you are getting them hemmed, if you don't soak them several times the hem may end up too short after hemming. This almost happened to my APCs, I had them hemmed and I left about 1/2-1" for shrinkage and they ended up being perfect, if not a tad too short.
     


  4. theom-

    theom- Senior member

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    I think it needs to be said that the day in and day out wear causes the creases and whiskers that denim develops over time, not the starch. I've read several times that the japanese pre soak their denim to rid it of the starch used in the weaving process. Also, in my personal experience denim seems to fade much faster after the first soak.

    Though, I bet in the long run it doesn't really matter just so long as you wear the fuckin jeans.
     


  5. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    I think it needs to be said that the day in and day out wear causes the creases and whiskers that denim develops over time, not the starch. I've read several times that the japanese pre soak their denim to rid it of the starch used in the weaving process. Also, in my personal experience denim seems to fade much faster after the first soak. Though, I bet in the long run it doesn't really matter just so long as you wear the fuckin jeans.
    Well the starch is what creates the folds in the denim that causes the contrast fading, and jeans tend to get stiffer after a soak which leads to even more defined creases. IF you soaked your jeans to get rid of the starch you'd get barely any if not no honeycombs, whiskers, etc.
     


  6. theom-

    theom- Senior member

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    ^^ that is simply not true. Read around on sufu. Also, why would self edge sell this jean http://www.selfedge.com/shop/index.p...roducts_id=483 if it wasn't going to take creases. I do recall kiya saying that these were very lightly starched. Also, when you hot soak an unsanforzied pair of denim, it loses most of its starch because starch is soluble in water. How do you get some of the best fades from denim like flathead and dry bones, which are unsanforized? Certainly the tendancy of stiffness after soaking unsanforized denim does not come from you adding starch.
     


  7. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    ^^ that is simply not true. Read around on sufu. Also, why would self edge sell this jean http://www.selfedge.com/shop/index.p...roducts_id=483 if it wasn't going to take creases. I do recall kiya saying that these were very lightly starched. Also, when you hot soak an unsanforzied pair of denim, it loses most of its starch because starch is soluble in water. How do you get some of the best fades from denim like flathead and dry bones, which are unsanforized? Certainly the tendancy of stiffness after soaking unsanforized denim does not come from you adding starch.
    So the removal of starch causes jeans to be able to stand on their own after a soak? Starch + water = glue. And so what if it's lightly starched? It's still starched. Take a pair of Levis (non-STF) and wear them for a while, you won't get defined creases (if any form at all) because the material is soft and doesn't have the starch. Sure you could get denim like that to fade but you're going to end up with much less contrast in the fades because there won't be the high points exposed to friction
     


  8. Sigmatic

    Sigmatic Senior member

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    it's true that starch is not soley responsible for fades and creases, but it sure as hell helps to define and set them.

    if you took 2 identical pair of sanforised denim, soaked one and left the other raw/stiff, i'm positive you'd see sharper/better set creases in the raw/stiff ones 95% of the time after the same amount of wear.

    yes, unsanforised denim loses much of its starch during the initial soak, but they make up for it because of the major shrinkage that happens will stiffen up the denim considerably.

    as for sufu, there are threads where people are talking about starching their jeans during/after a soak and even walking around with mini cans of spray starch to give their jeans a quick hit while at work. the creases on some of the jeans are super intense. too much starch though can lead to 'burning' of the denim.
     


  9. theom-

    theom- Senior member

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    So the removal of starch causes jeans to be able to stand on their own after a soak? Starch + water = glue. And so what if it's lightly starched? It's still starched. Take a pair of Levis (non-STF) and wear them for a while, you won't get defined creases (if any form at all) because the material is soft and doesn't have the starch. Sure you could get denim like that to fade but you're going to end up with much less contrast in the fades because there won't be the high points exposed to friction

    Okay first of all, denim weight is a big factor in how the jeans take creases. Second, why do old pairs of raw denim still have creases? There certainly isn't any starch in a pair that has been washed more than 3 times. I have definitely seen combs and fading in denim that has been pre washed, just because they are worn all the time.
    Also, do you think farmers cared how well their jeans take creases? They probably washed them a lot to make them more comfortable. I have definitely seen truckers and farmers with excellent creasing and fading.
     


  10. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    Okay first of all, denim weight is a big factor in how the jeans take creases. Second, why do old pairs of raw denim still have creases? There certainly isn't any starch in a pair that has been washed more than 3 times. I have definitely seen combs and fading in denim that has been pre washed, just because they are worn all the time. Also, do you think farmers cared how well their jeans take creases? They probably washed them a lot to make them more comfortable. I have definitely seen truckers and farmers with excellent creasing and fading.
    Most artisan denim floats around 14-16oz so that's a moot point, obviously 6oz summer jeans aren't going to hold themselves up. And the denim holds the crease because it's been set in (like asking why trousers have a crease....). I never said you wouldn't be able to get fading, all denim's going to fade at some point, but it won't be as high-contrast since the areas that normally would be dark from no wear would be losing color from the washes. Well the farmers are putting in a lot more work than most people do and they probably wear them for longer, once again though, because of the wash they come out light (since I highly doubt your everyday farmer is going to be using woolite dark)
     


  11. alliswell

    alliswell Senior member

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    Where can I find straight fit grey denim?

    - raw/un-distressed preferably
    - N&F Weird Guy at Tobi looks good but too skinny
     


  12. michaelp123

    michaelp123 Well-Known Member

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    Where can I find straight fit grey denim?

    - raw/un-distressed preferably
    - N&F Weird Guy at Tobi looks good but too skinny


    Acne Mic
     


  13. joel_954

    joel_954 Senior member

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    Where can I find straight fit grey denim?

    - raw/un-distressed preferably
    - N&F Weird Guy at Tobi looks good but too skinny


    Bloomingdale's has Spurr gray denim.
     


  14. fashunhor

    fashunhor Senior member

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    ^^Anything under $150 in raw grey? If uniqlo didn't bleach and whisker their grey jeans I would probably get those.
     


  15. aeglus

    aeglus Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    ^^Anything under $150 in raw grey? If uniqlo didn't bleach and whisker their grey jeans I would probably get those.

    Uniqlo's whiskers on the jeans are easy to get rid of with an iron, and I don't remember them being bleached at all. Mine from Uniqlo are solid grey and I took out the whiskers pretty fast.
     


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