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I bought a sharpening stone

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Manton, Oct 18, 2008.

  1. Infrasonic

    Infrasonic Senior member

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    I got a stone about twenty years ago and have used it for all my knives on a regular basis. None of my knives are particularly fancy but they all have a keen edge.

    If you get into the habit from day one it's really a 30 second job per knife. Admittedly I'm not into major butchery so re-profiling has never been an issue for me.

    Apparently the pro. meat guys retain quite rough edges to their knives, too polished and they don't slice as well. Worth bearing in mind for cleavers etc.
     
  2. Gutman

    Gutman Senior member

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    i am worried after reading this thread - yesterday i bought a Norton stone in 120/280 grit, for my stainless steel knives, which I take it is far too coarse? it was the finest i could get, but may have to go to a specialist kitchen store. what grade is best (leaving aside fancy-pants products and preferences)?

    i should have consulted the SF oracles first...
     
  3. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    i am worried after reading this thread - yesterday i bought a Norton stone in 120/280 grit, for my stainless steel knives, which I take it is far too coarse? it was the finest i could get, but may have to go to a specialist kitchen store. what grade is best (leaving aside fancy-pants products and preferences)?

    i should have consulted the SF oracles first...


    Hmmm, I've not heard of that grit for a waterstone - perhaps that's US grit ratings? If US grits then you're not in all that bad a shape.
     
  4. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    Hmmm, I've not heard of that grit for a waterstone - perhaps that's US grit ratings? If US grits then you're not in all that bad a shape.

    I think Norton is an American company, not Japanese, so those are probably US ratings.

    In other news, I picked up 1000 and 6000 King stones today in Osaka. I couldn't find the combination stone so I got them separately. Going to give them a try tomorrow.
     
  5. willpower

    willpower Senior member

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  6. Big A

    Big A Senior member

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    This just proves there's a fetish community for everything.
     
  7. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    This just proves there's a fetish community for everything.

    you'd think that the mere existence of styleforvm would be sufficient proof of that.
     
  8. alliswell

    alliswell Senior member

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    Knife damage and repair question: someone who no longer works for me used by Wusthof Grand Prix chef's knife to pry open a can of tomatoes. It's damaged in three places - two dents along the edge and a broken tip. Is this something that can be repaired by a civilian, a specialist, or not at all?

    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
  9. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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  10. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think a knife dinged up as badly as that Wustof has to go to a professional. Certainly I would not be able to fix it myself.
     
  11. hitsu

    hitsu Member

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    I use Japanese synthetic waterstones only.
    They are cheap, durable and effective.
    A combination stone of 1000 and 6000 grit will do nicely. KING is the most common brand seen outside of Japan.
    My advise is to buy the largest one you can find. Sharpening with a small stone is hell...

    Here is a very nice clip on using waterstones by a pro who uses his knives a LOT.

    If interested in Japanese cuisine, check his other vids too.

    Cheers,
    M


    that guy has absurd knife skills.. I've been trying to follow his vid on sharpening with pretty much no succuess, though. maybe I just need to keep at it for longer than a couple of minutes
     
  12. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    This just proves there's a fetish community for everything.

    i was researching kitchen knives and there is a cutlery forum with a subforum for "Christian Knife Enthusiasts." No lie.
     
  13. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    Knife damage and repair question: someone who no longer works for me used by Wusthof Grand Prix chef's knife to pry open a can of tomatoes. It's damaged in three places - two dents along the edge and a broken tip. Is this something that can be repaired by a civilian, a specialist, or not at all?

    you can probably get it fixed, but at what cost? they'll have to shorten the knife by at least half and inch and remove a good quarter to half-inch of belly. And it'll probably cost around $30 to $40 to do it. Considering you can probably find a new gp chef's knife for around $80, that's probably not a good deal.
     
  14. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Knife damage and repair question: someone who no longer works for me used by Wusthof Grand Prix chef's knife to pry open a can of tomatoes. It's damaged in three places - two dents along the edge and a broken tip. Is this something that can be repaired by a civilian, a specialist, or not at all?

    I think a knife dinged up as badly as that Wustof has to go to a professional. Certainly I would not be able to fix it myself.

    you can probably get it fixed, but at what cost? they'll have to shorten the knife by at least half and inch and remove a good quarter to half-inch of belly. And it'll probably cost around $30 to $40 to do it. Considering you can probably find a new gp chef's knife for around $80, that's probably not a good deal.

    Hmmm. If this were my knife, I would take a 4-lb hammer to gently bring the dents close into line. Once that was done, I'd polish the remaining flares off, and grind a new bevel to bring the tip back to a point.

    The reason I'm advocating this for the Wusthof, where I did not for Manton's Shun, is 1) that the Wusthof has softer steel than the Shun and is likely less brittle/more malleable (AND the Shun is laminated, which adds a whole new layer of complexity), 2) Manton's bent area was at the tip, which is IMHO trickier to straighten since there is nothing on the other side of the ding, and 3) Shun's guarantee.

    And finally, foodguy's advice pretty well defines why I would try it myself: if it works, great - it took a few minutes and cost me nothing. If it didn't work and I ruined the knife - well...I'm out the $80 for a new knife, where I might have been out $40 for a repaired knife with no guarantees of success.

    Good luck with it, let us know what you wind up doing and holler if you have questions.
     
  15. Bhowie

    Bhowie Senior member

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    T-Bone thanks for the info in this thread.
     
  16. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Knife damage and repair question: someone who no longer works for me used by Wusthof Grand Prix chef's knife to pry open a can of tomatoes. It's damaged in three places - two dents along the edge and a broken tip. Is this something that can be repaired by a civilian, a specialist, or not at all?

    If someone did this to my knife, I would most likely grind it down on their teeth.
     
  17. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    T-Bone thanks for the info in this thread.

    aw shucks, glad to share what I can!

    If someone did this to my knife, I would most likely grind it down on their teeth.

    you wouldn't have to: the Shun has a Kamikaze spirit forged into it that would take off the unlucky bastard's fingers - at the second knuckle.
     
  18. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    you wouldn't have to: the Shun has a Kamikaze spirit forged into it that would take off the unlucky bastard's fingers - at the second knuckle.
    [​IMG]

    I need a medium-sized knife. Just bought a Sugimoto Gara-ski 170mm and a Sugimoto cleaver. [​IMG] Will update w/ poarn when they arrive.
     
  19. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    I need a medium-sized knife. Just bought a Sugimoto Gara-ski 170mm and a Sugimoto cleaver. [​IMG] Will update w/ poarn when they arrive.


    LOL, Mrs. T has started reaching for my old 240mm gyutou, when her santoku isn't available.
     
  20. alliswell

    alliswell Senior member

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    (To paraphase) Hit it with a hammer.

    Done and done [​IMG] It's not pretty but after honing it cuts a tomato. Next question. I'm planning on getting a waterstone to take care of the other straight edges in this set. Do I need something less than 1000 grit to grind a new edge on this one?
     

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