1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

How to recognize nationalities through clothes?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Fabienne, Dec 17, 2004.

  1. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

    Messages:
    2,030
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    (Nonk @ 18 Dec. 2004, 05:14) A male in either cords or moleskins in some never before seen colour such as purple, pink, scarlet or bright yellow- Brit. You again ViroBono? [​IMG]
    Currently in my wardrobe: Cords - Scarlet, orange, electric blue, navy blue, corn yellow, gold and rust Moleskins: Dark red and dark green Worn with country shoes with double or even triple soles, preferably with Blakeys, or loafers. Â Socks to be in a contrasting but equally sudden colour, naturally. 100% Polyester RTW uniform, 17 rows of medals but 2 years service, many, many badges, patent shoes, hands in pockets, smoking and saluting indoors - US military officer Polo shirt with collar up, jumper over shoulders, trousers slightly too tight, hair slightly too long and greasy, too much cologne failing to disguise smell of BO and garlic - Johnny Frenchman Expensive but casual designer clothes with many labels on display, iPod, digital camera x 2, latest mobile phone - Japanese
    Hey, Ernest, are you going to let that go unchallenged? [​IMG] Seriously, my countrymen are somewhat disappointing, but less so than most Americans. US members of this forum excluded, I'm sure. I am impressed by your collection of cords, ViroBono. My husband (American) has a pair of orange cords (French designer) and they are my favorites out of all his wardrobe.
     
  2. Nonk

    Nonk Senior member

    Messages:
    752
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    ViroBono used to be in the Royal Flying Corps, they had a uniform so smart it had a Phd from Cambridge.

    (Apologies to Ben Elton and Richard Curtis)
     
  3. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    Splendid. I am sure they look much better than the issue variety. Gieves still make the Nelson-style boatcloaks, if you have a couple of thousand pounds to spare.

    Nonk - how well I remember the twenty-minuters.
     
  4. Trilby

    Trilby Senior member

    Messages:
    178
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Interesting. The US and British forces are obviously very different creatures, but I have heard several people say that the Marines are the part of the US military that is most similar to the British forces. The structure of the Marines and their distinct traditions and history separate from the rest of the US forces create something akin to the British regimental system. John Keegan has written thoughtfully on this, and friends in the British army have made similar comments. Obviously your experiences may differ.

    Anyway, I'm impressed by your collection of cords and moleskins. I have a few pairs of very loud moleskins, but my cords are more subdued in comparison. I need to see if I can improve my collection in the January sales.
     
  5. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    I see what you are getting at, Trilby. Some of the differences are that the USMC will often have a commissioned officer doing a job done by a sergeant in our forces; whilst our soldiers often join a particular 'family' regiment based in their home area, this doesn't appear to happen in the USMC, though there's no doubt that the USMC are as fiercely loyal to the Corps as we are to regiments. Another difference is that the USMC are well-equipped and are respected by their government, in stark contrast to our own forces.

    I should add that we don't go in for all this shouting ('hooah.', or whatever it is), and the group hugs and backslappping that seems to go with it, and which is viewed with both amusement and a little suspicion by our guys, which is odd whn you consider that whilst on ex at MCAS Cherry Point 40 of our Paras went swimming at Myrtle Beach and then queued up to be seated at a local Red Lobster - naked, and thought nothing of it....
     
  6. Nonk

    Nonk Senior member

    Messages:
    752
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Some things are too important to be left in the hands of a British officer. [​IMG] Nonk, former Sergeant.
     
  7. acole

    acole Senior member

    Messages:
    223
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2004
    Location:
    Redwood City, California
    Well, in my experience...safari/cargo-type shorts + DARK socks + athletic shoes or sandals = German, Danish, Dutch, etc. (I normally expect white crew socks (or NO socks) with this kind of garb here in the States.)
     
  8. Trilby

    Trilby Senior member

    Messages:
    178
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Sadly true. After the huge political row about sending the Black Watch to Falluja, I'm staggered that this government is now proposing to consolidate the regiment out of existence.
     
  9. ernest

    ernest Senior member

    Messages:
    2,564
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2004
    Location:
    PARIS
    What?
     
  10. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

    Messages:
    2,030
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Euh... the unpleasant description of the Frenchman above. I can't look at it again, it is too painful.
     
  11. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    Perhaps this is a more typical Frenchman, Citoyenne: [​IMG]
     
  12. Roy

    Roy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    (Fabienne @ 19 Dec. 2004, 06:45) Euh... the unpleasant description of the Frenchman above. Â I can't look at it again, it is too painful.
    Perhaps this is a more typical Frenchman, Citoyenne: [​IMG]
    How about this: http://216.71.104.94/d-commerce/product337.html
     
  13. Nonk

    Nonk Senior member

    Messages:
    752
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Nice one Centurion
     
  14. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

    Messages:
    20,605
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    greater chicago
    I probrably have a warmer feelign for the french than most americans, but let me tell you this little story - a few years ago I rode for a week with a french sales manager who sold my products. 5 working days. his wardrobe for this was 2 shirts, 1 pair of pants and 2 jackets. he smoked heavily and we ate very well during this week. I honestly don't believe that he took a shower during this week. he was a great guy, and he was good at what he did, and he treated me nicly, but I was happy to get some fresh air by the end of the week. and this was a well educated, upper middle class frenchman.


    by the way, I am intending to contribute heavliy to this thread, but I am a little tied up with my family.
     
  15. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

    Messages:
    2,030
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    (Fabienne @ 19 Dec. 2004, 06:45) Euh... the unpleasant description of the Frenchman above. Â I can't look at it again, it is too painful.
    Perhaps this is a more typical Frenchman, Citoyenne: [​IMG]
    How did you guess I hadn't become an American citizen? The picture: looks like theater play garb. As for the other Frenchman outfit, at least you have the "instant French girl" to console yourself. Wait, it is sold out. Sorry guys.
     
  16. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    Fabienne - the picture is from the original film of 'The Scarlet Pimpernel', and is of Raymond Massey playing the part of Citizen Chauvelin, ambassador to England of Robespierre's France.
     
  17. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    (maxnharry @ 18 Dec. 2004, 10:01) Not all of us...U.S. Navy Officer with 100% Wool bespoke uniforms.
    Splendid. I am sure they look much better than the issue variety. Gieves still make the Nelson-style boatcloaks, if you have a couple of thousand pounds to spare. Nonk - how well I remember the twenty-minuters.
    I thought Nelson didn't need a boatcloak since he kept warm with his zeal for king and country... Jon.
     
  18. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    Nelson was an example to all true Englishmen (as was Wellington), and is celebrated annually in RN Wardrooms on Trafalgar Night, the most important function of the year. The room is hung with French tricolours, representing the colours struck by the French admirals when they surrendered. A speech is given to the Immortal Memory of Nelson. I have been to a few, and they are superb occasions.

    Next year we will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar. Alas. our hopelessly politically correct lefty government have invited the French Navy to take part, demonstrating more than they already have how little they understand the military. I wonder if, at some point, Nelson's famous last signal to the Fleet will break from the British flagship's peak - 'Enagage The Enemy More Closely'....
     
  19. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

    Messages:
    2,030
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    It does get a bit jumbled, in this "united" Europe of ours, where everyone was at war with their neighbor at one time or another. Â I was once scheduling, in person, a subsequent meeting with a German, and twice had to decline because these were days when we were celebrating a victory other them. He didn't realize it right away, finally asked why these days were holidays, and I had to answer. Â Not a very comfortable moment. Â I communicate with Europeans on a daily basis, and thank goodness, when they first learn I am French, they are typically pleased and interested. Â If we are talking French revolution era, then I prefer the Julien de St Preux style: http://www.ecranlarge.com/jaquette-261.php But really, ViroBono, aren't you pleased you guys lost the battle of Hastings? Â Your dictionary would be about half the size it is now, if you hadn't.
     
  20. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    One side of my family is descended from the Normans who invaded in 1066, which was the last time Britain was invaded. I think we made up for losing later - several times, in fact, though we are all in the EU now and apparently friends.

    I would not wish you to think I dislike France - I've been there many times and rather like it, though I prefer the country to the cities. If I could find a downloadable MP3 of the Marche Lorraine played by a military band I'd like it more - I've got a few bits of French military music but I've been after this track for ages.

    I was interested to see the Black Tulip. I wonder if one of the reasons England and France traditionally mistrust each other is because we still believe in the monarchy, whilst the French seem to believe strongly in the tenets of the revolution. Had I been around in those days I could only have been on one side - Vive les aristos.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by