How to get the center dimple in a tie?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by cpadude, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. cpadude

    cpadude Active Member

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    Some of the better dressers at work are able to get a dimple in their tie just below the know that is really symmetrical and looks quite good. Is there some trick/knot to making this happen?
     


  2. Hand Tailored

    Hand Tailored Well-Known Member

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    This going to be hard to tell you with no pictures, but I use a technique that is a combination of some of the more common ones out there.

    First, I assume you're right handed? Lay the tie around your neck with the fat end on the left, and the seem outward. Now, you should have the fat end about 3× longer than the tail-end of it. Grab the tail end about half-way of its length. Then, grab the fat end at about the same point--so your hands are at roughly the same place in space.

    Put the fat end under the tail, and wrap it to the left. It should now be going under the tail, and wrapped over it. Pull the fat end between the two sides that were formed when you crossed the ends. Wrap it around the LEFT side, and then around the back. Then pull it from the front to the back between the two sides and wrap it around the RIGHT side. Wrap it around the front, and pull it between through the back and tuck it into the front like you would normally. MAKE SURE NO PARTS OVERLAP!

    This method makes sure the triagle is perfectly symetrical, which makes getting the dimple a synch!! Tighten the tie by squeezing on the bottom of the triange between your middle finger and thumb. Your index finger should be pushing in on the middle of the tie where you want the dimple to form. Pull the tie tight, making sure to stretch the two ends with your other hand to keep the triangle nice and wide and even.

    Hope this helps, and is easy to follow. If I get a chance, I'll do some computer drawins of the whole process for it to be easier to understand.


    HT
     


  3. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Create the dimple with your fingers before you tighten the knot. And make sure not to overtighten.
     


  4. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    Duplicated
     


  5. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    If I get a chance, I'll do some computer drawins of the whole process for it to be easier to understand.

    HT


    Try looking for the knot you describe on http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~tmf20/tieknots.shtml. If it's there, it will save you the effort.
     


  6. Hand Tailored

    Hand Tailored Well-Known Member

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    Try looking for the knot you describe on http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~tmf20/tieknots.shtml. If it's there, it will save you the effort.

    Sorry, but I couldn't find a drawing of my method, and the descriptions without drawings were just too vague to follow. I think I shall just draw some by hand for now.


    HT
     


  7. Rolo

    Rolo Senior member

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    Try a Pratt (also called Shelby) knot.

    It is very symmetrical (too symmetrical for some). Is easy to dimple. And, it doesn't shift during the day.

    It looks like a half-Windsor, except that the knot ties straight across (like a full Windsor) rather than crossing the knot on at a slant.

    Here's a site that shows how to tie it.

    http://www.totieatie.com/pratt.asp
     


  8. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    [​IMG]
     


  9. jml90

    jml90 Senior member

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    Try a Pratt (also called Shelby) knot.

    It is very symmetrical (too symmetrical for some). Is easy to dimple. And, it doesn't shift during the day.

    It looks like a half-Windsor, except that the knot ties straight across (like a full Windsor) rather than crossing the knot on at a slant.

    Here's a site that shows how to tie it.

    http://www.totieatie.com/pratt.asp


    What the difference between the Nicky and the Pratt?
     


  10. Hombre Secreto

    Hombre Secreto Senior member

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    I basically just hold together the tie underneath the knot, and then tighten the knot.
     


  11. Rolo

    Rolo Senior member

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    What the difference between the Nicky and the Pratt?

    They're almost exactly the same. For the Nicky you take the wide end to the right in step four and with the Pratt you go to the left.
     


  12. lakewolf

    lakewolf Senior member

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    I also found out that the dimple is easier to get, when you carefully make it on the first time you knot the tie.

    Once the tie is worn it kind of forms to the way this first-time knot was made and then follows this kind of positioning in the future.... tie knot memory
     


  13. clarinetplayer

    clarinetplayer Senior member

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    I also found out that the dimple is easier to get, when you carefully make it on the first time you knot the tie.

    Once the tie is worn it kind of forms to the way this first-time knot was made and then follows this kind of positioning in the future.... tie knot memory


    "Tie knot memory" I've also heard this referred to as the "sweet spot". Any traditional, standard tie knot should produce a dimple. The better the fabric, the easier it is to tie and to achieve that dimpled look.
     


  14. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    I can't believe it took nine hours for someone to post this. Still, at least it was done ...
     


  15. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    To make a decent dimple, I find it works best to tie the tie loosely, as noted above. Don't cinch the knot tight and then pull it up into the collar. When you put the front blade through to form the knot, leave it loose. Make sure the part of the front blade that is inside the knot is spread out and smooth, without any folds. If you pull up the knot and there are already folds in there, they will set and make a centered dimple impossible.

    Gently pull the knot up into the collar before you tighten it. Then work in the dimple as you tighten and fix in place the knot. Basically, all you need to do is press an impression into the tie, just below the knot, with your index finger. Make sure to center the impression. Then, as you gently tighten the knot, keep your index finger there and use your thumb and middle finger to hold the sides of the dimple even. Don't over tighten. If your knot ends up looking like something worn by the cast of LA Law, it's too tight.
     


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