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How Much Attention Do You Pay to "Your" Coloring?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Manton, Aug 2, 2012.

How Much Attention Do You Pay to "Your" Coloring?

  1. Tons; I am a slavish follower of Carol Jackson

    1 vote(s)
    2.3%
  2. A lot; I know what works for me and what to avoid

    14 vote(s)
    31.8%
  3. A little; I never thought about it until seeing the doctored photos in Dressing the Man but now I tr

    12 vote(s)
    27.3%
  4. None; I put together ensembles based on how the clothes go together but with no consideration of my

    17 vote(s)
    38.6%
  1. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

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    PSG, that reminds me... When I was very young, people would tell me I looked good in pink, since my skin is fairly dark. But then I spent a year in the Philippines and people said I didn't look very good in pink, since my skin is too light. I'm not sure what the lesson is in this. Maybe again that some things about it are objective and some are relative.

    I think you, bmulford, or Niidawg, once said that it makes sense to coordinate colors of things and your face and hair have their own color. This isn't to say one should be as rigid as Dressing the Man or other books may imply. (I don't own that Flusser book and didn't see that section when flipping through it once. Have never seen Colors for Men.)


    I'm w/ you, Nii, and Dah, and others in this. It's kind of like astrology to me: Sometimes, when I hear a claim or two, it kinda makes sense, but I've never studied it.


    Wow, I think what you say about process > outcome except for in certain situations describes me well too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  2. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I laughed reading the Carol Jackson choice in the poll. I met her twice at publishing events when she was launching her career. Each time I asked her, "What color am I". Each time she gave me a different answer. But in fairness, the second time was after spending a few days at the beach and I was more tanned. That may have had something to do with it. But that also shows that color selection can be influenced by some seasonal variations.

    I could probably pull off a medium grey suit this time of year because I tend to have a bit more of a tan from being outside. I could never wear one in Oct-April without looking washed out.
     
  3. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    My guess is that it isn't "pink" in general that works or doesn't work, it is selecting the right shade of pink that best compliments your skin tone.

    What people call pink ranges anywhere from a pale, almost white, to dusty rose, to watermelon to pinkish lavender. You have to find the best one for you.

    There is no question that certain colors and intensity of color choices have an ethic and cultural slant in their homelands. That may have effected the feedback you received in the Philippines. Look how many in Latin America prefer more intensity in their color pallet. But they also have deeper skin tones, dark hair and a tradition of more intense colors.
     
  4. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I've enjoyed reading this discussion. Personally the only area where I pay any conscious attention is that I've got more green ties than I would if my eyes weren't also green. Maybe that's considered garanimalesque matching by some. But I like the effect. I read the Flusser stuff and also noticed the doctored photos and thought, if you've got to doctor the photos to make your point...maybe your point isn't that much of a point.

    I've also got, or at least I think I've got, a complexion that doesn't really preclude anything. My skin is kind of medium tone with some pink, my hair a medium to dark brown. There are some colors that I rarely wear, like red or its darker variants. I have one burgundy scarf that I like. I think that's it. It doesn't derive from anything I read or thought about analytically relating to my coloring, but there could be some relation that is more intuitive. Or maybe I just don't like red.
     
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I always thought one of the great things about being a man is that we don't have to worry about things like complexion and clothing. Then my ginger friend told me that is just because I am olive skinned and look good in anything. Touche.
     
  6. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    I don't know how to answer the question.

    I think I know that certain colors look good on me and that others are to be avoided.

    But I'm not sure I could tangibly give you a theory as to why, and it's also simply possible that I simply don't like those colors. It's also possible I'm driven a bit by racialist preferences as to what one "ought" to wear. Example: I think most pastel colors look awful on me because I am somewhat dark-complected, but it might just be because I think preppy white boys wear pastels.
     
  7. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I also recall being at a men's store somewhere or another and this black man asked me my advice on a shirt for this mid gray suit he was purchasing. I immediately reached for the light blue shirt. He said, "Yeah, that looks good... but I'm black." We both started laughing nervously.
     
  8. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    I did not vote. The option: [COLOR=FF00AA]A lot; I know what works for me and what to avoid[/COLOR] would have worked for me if it had read Very little; as I already know what works for me and know what to use and what to avoid. Textures, patterns and most of all experience are of equal importance to colour. Colours that may not work with ones skin tones in a shirt, may work in a textured jacket, pants or perhaps in a nice tie.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  9. eg1

    eg1 Senior member

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    Me either -- never was able to figure out what "season" I was supposed to be. When I was younger I worried about anything that might make my already pasty-white/blotchy red Irishness more florid. Now that I am older, maybe my skin is just greying or something, because I don't notice it anymore.

    I have blue eyes and white (used to be grey, but who am I kidding anymore) hair, if that helps explain my colouring any better.

    So I voted some awareness and concern because I used to think about it, but now I have pretty much given it up.
     
  10. Frankie22

    Frankie22 Senior member

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    The problem, imo, with Jackson book is if you are a "hybrid" things get super complicated.

    Both summer and winters share many characteristics, but what if you have all the "summer features" but a dark beard on the light skin, while having less contrasting hair on your had, etc.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  11. Thanks SF (a new me)

    Thanks SF (a new me) Senior member

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    emptym, this is very interesting as I have the exact experience. Looking at your pics, I think we almost have the same complextion , with the exeption that I tend to cut close/very short to what's left of my black hair. But I think PSG's take below that it is possibly part of a cultural slant is right on. IMO, most of the general population back in the islands tend to associate the pink color family as feminine...


    I tend to stay with Navy/Blue, Grey, and Olive as much as I can, with a few items with Pink, Lavender, Purple, Green to add color and break the monotony.
    In summary, I am a boringly dressed NooB......
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  12. mmkn

    mmkn Senior member

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    Like Abe, you are a man of integrity.



    ^ There is much insight here.

    Jackson, who started with purely "an emotional response" to someone wearing a certain color and then systematized it, submits that everyone can wear most every color - but the particular tone (light/dark) and temperature (cool/warm) of the color is key as to whether that color will . . .

    1 - compete with the person's colors,
    2 - drown them out, or
    3 - bring them forth.

    [​IMG]



    Flusser couldn't expand much on Jackson's insight, but he did delineate the fundamental of contrast (Jackson's "intensity") that is important in clothing colors.

    At its simplest any color has a combination of black, white, blue, and yellow within it. Vary the black and white lever and you get tone and contrast; vary the blue and yellow lever and you get the temperature.

    It is not surprising that her submissions aren't popular here on the SF bromance sausage fest as Jackson's eyes, after all, are that of a woman.

    It still does not negate the fact, as instinctively noted by others here, that there are some color that they either look good in, or are attracted to.

    - M

    RJ - first glory holes (I hope you mean the Alaskan ghs) and now teh chocolate - where have you been Kat?
     
  13. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Not trying to belittle your point - I haven't even read the book - but seems like a lot of blah blah to get to: "there are some color that they either look good in, or are attracted to."

    Wouldn't it be easier just to look at yourself next to different colors and judge for yourself? This was kind of what I was getting at with my "utility of rules in dress" thread...maybe some of this stuff is useful as a general guide but it seems silly to me for someone to be choosing clothes to buy or wear for the day and think, "this looks pretty good, but I'm a winter and this is orange, so I can't wear that"
     
  14. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    I ignore it entirely. I have enough problems. Frankly, I think it is mostly ridiculous anyway. The only exception I can think of is if you are a real outlier, e.g. you have flaming red hair. In that case, I would think you would have to pay a little attention to your "coloring" but only in the sense that you don't want your hair to clash with your tie.
     
  15. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    In theory yes. But in practice, it isn't easy at all. It takes a lot of work and trial and error to venture successfully beyond basic combinations of navy, most blues, medium grey, etc.. (often very expensive errors) We all get carried away by the emotional response we have to a color, thinking that because we like it, it will look good on us. That is what the fashion industry is all about (and color trends). Because of color trend/fashion pressure, it makes it even more difficult to develop an objective eye for what looks good on ourselves.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. Jackie Treehorn

    Jackie Treehorn Senior member

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    Anecdotally, I think there's something to the color theory. I've seen a lot of guys with dark brown or black skin completely rock a very pale lavender, or pink, or yellow, or blue shirt, while men with very pale skin will look sickly and washed-out in similar colors. Conversely, pale, high-contrast men tend to look good in the sort of rich, dark colors that get lost against swarthier complexions.

    Perhaps we needn't go so far as to adopt cutesy "seasons" for ourselves, and we shouldn't restrict our tastes if following a prescribed palette would strongly oppose them. But we shouldn't dismiss so readily what the eye can plainly see.

    Personally speaking, I have a fairly Italian/Mediterranean complexion: very dark brown hair (almost black), hazel-brown eyes, and olive toned skin that runs the gamut from white to creamy to almost brown, depending on sun exposure. When I've had no sun in a long time, I look like a freaking ghost. When I've had a lot of sun, I look fucking amazing. Almost Latin. When I fall somewhere in between those two extremes, it's kind of a toss-up. Needless to say, this complexion is sartorially challenging. For years I tried to fight it, wearing whatever colors I chose. The more I came to accept it, the better I looked.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  17. mmkn

    mmkn Senior member

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    ^ In-depth insights again.

    To mock G. Stein . . . A Gray is not a gray is not a gray is not a gray is not a gray is not a gray . . .

    - M
     
  18. Jackie Treehorn

    Jackie Treehorn Senior member

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    Are you suggesting there are, perhaps...50 shades?
     
  19. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    :lol:
     
  20. mmkn

    mmkn Senior member

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    :rotflmao: Gertrude is not of the persuasion that I would visualize 50 shades . . .

    Why is facial colors important?

    In ANY good design, the eyes needs to be drawn to a focal point. .

    It is there that attention should be first drawn to, and everything else should somehow relate to that point. Otherwise, the composition is just a mess.

    In the fashion world, focus is placed upon the clothes so consumers will buy them.

    However, in style, the focal point should be on one's face.

    The world of no-face SF photos have created a beast - that of folks putting together outfits, albeit well relating within the outfits, that don't relate well to them at all.

    It can be expensive, as PSG (aka Mr. Boobies :)) pointed out, as publicly people might put photos of clothes up for pats on the back, yet they privately rarely gravitate to wearing them with any frequency.

    - M
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2012

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