How do I specify this jacket details to my tailor?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by kolecho, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. kolecho

    kolecho Senior member

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    I am making a bespoke suit for the first time. Â May I ask how can I specify the following details to my tailor? - Button stance: Â Where the highest, middle and lowest buttons should be placed with reference to my body? - Hip pocket: Â Am I right to say that it lines up with the lowest button? Â If so, then how do I determine where the hip pocket is with reference to my body? - Breast pocket: Â How do I specify where it should be? - Double vents: Â Does it stop in line with the hip pocket? Many thanks in advance. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     


  2. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    High is good. Â A generally accepted formula for finding the button point is to take the coat length (measured on the center backseam), divide by two, and then subtract 1 1/2". Â Or less, if you are short. Â That gives a nice high button point. Â Then put the other buttons 4.5" above and below the middle button. Â Or slightly less if you are short. Please note that button stance also depends on the lapel roll and the waist of the coat, which depends in part on how the coat front and lapels are cut. Â So if you want a high button stance from a tailor who does not do this as a matter of course, you need to tell him that at your first meeting, before he draws your pattern.
    That is the Savile Row way, yes.
    I don't understand.
    Your tailor ought to know where to put it. Â If you're going to be dictating button stances (and this is unusual for clients to do) then you ought to let the tailor do something on his own. Â [​IMG]
    That's one way to do it. Â Some tailors also have a proportional formula that adjusts vent depth according to the client's height.
     


  3. kolecho

    kolecho Senior member

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    Thanks, Manton and Mack. I did print some pictures for my tailor [​IMG] and, being the nice guy that he is, he was not offended. I wanted to get some lessons from the forum so that I can judge for myself. Question: On a roll-through 3 button jacket, is it correct to say that the middle button is in the same position as the top button of a two button jacket?
     


  4. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Yes. Some will place it slightly lower, but I think that's a bad idea.
     


  5. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Somewhat off-topic:  I have a project that I've been thinking about for some time-- a 3-button that can close like an overcoat.  The middle button would necessarily be high, the top would be exactly halfway between the middle and the bouttoniere, and the lowest would be the same distance from the middle-- maybe at the lower edge of the pocket flap.  In bad weather, one could then turn up the collar and button the front all the way.

    This would have to be a very relaxed cut in tweed, with relatively little cut away in the front.  Not at all an urban look, of course, and a different idea from the very nice suit you are considering.

    Getting back to your point, I'd exercise some care in dictating too much to the tailor, or allow some push-back if you do.  Although most tailors will say that they can do anything you like, the best will also work in what THEY like.  You need to figure out if their vision of you in their suit is anything like yours.  Also, there are practical details that you might not have thought of.  One tailor I know puts the side seam of the trousers a little forward-- this is allegedly A&S standard practice.  That makes on-seam pockets feasible and desirable, whereas  if the seam were further aft you might find slanted pockets more comfortable.

    And if they tell you what's "normal" with a sufficiently scolding expression, then you should probably do it that way or be prepared to walk to someone else.  Some fights are not worth winning.
     


  6. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    That sounds a bit like a shirt jacket. If so, I know Cifonelli had some good examples a year or so ago (i.e, tweed exterior, cashmere lining).
     


  7. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I am also thinking in another context of a shirt jacket-- i.e., an untailored shirt made in tweed, just a bit of satin lining to ease it on and off, and maybe patch breast pockets. No padding, no bulk. Suitable to wear over a sweater down to freezing but not below. Paul Stuart has some nice ones on their website.

    But this would be a separate item.
     


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