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How best to prevent (and fix) rugged/jagged collar on t-shirts

Discussion in 'Menswear Advice' started by Tobes, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. Tobes

    Tobes Active Member

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    Hi everyone. I'm looking to wear less t-shirts and a more smarter look but do wear t-shirts regularly.

    I bought some brand new t-shirts recently and already they're looking very worn around the collar after only a few washes. The rest of the t-shirt is fine but the collar looks as if it has been in a tug-of-war match.

    Hand-washing is something I'd been thinking of and it's recommended by some brands over machine washing. Does anyone have experience with hand-washing and does it prevent t-shirt collars becoming jagged?

    If anyone knows of any ways to prevent jagged collars, please reply. Or if there are ways to fix collars like this, please share your input.

    The good thing about button-up shirts is they don't have this jagged collar but t-shirts are good for many occasions, so it would be great to fix this problem.
     


  2. JLibourel

    JLibourel Distinguished Member

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    What kind of T-shirts are you buying? I don't wear T-shirts much except as underwear, but I don't have this problem even after years of use. Perhaps there is something amiss in the way you are laundering them.
     


  3. Tobes

    Tobes Active Member

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    Thanks for your reply. I buy mostly v-necks now but have crew necks and noticed the same problem. What brands of t-shirt do you buy?

    Recently I've started buying more expensive brands in the hope of longevity of the clothing vs. cheaper brands. However, these t-shirts were from a cheaper department store, even though they were advertised as good quality cotton. I've contemplated buying brands such as Calvin Klein or any of the more expensive brands but I don't want to spend a lot and have the same problem again, so might stick it out and see if it can be fixed with these cheaper department store brands first.

    They go through a regular washing machine on cold temperature with a fast spin. Thinking about hand-washing, though, just not sure whether that would give as comprehensive a wash as a full machine wash does.
     


  4. JLibourel

    JLibourel Distinguished Member

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    All my undershirts are J.C. Penney premium-weight V-necks. Far from hand washing or cold washing them, I just throw them in the washing machine with my other stuff, wash 'em in hot water, throw 'em in the dryer. No problems so far!
     


  5. paxonus

    paxonus Senior Member

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    The solution to this problem is a polo shirt.
     


  6. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Distinguished Member

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    Maybe the problem is over-drying. Or, are the t-shirts being stretched by hangers?
     


  7. Hung-Wei Long

    Hung-Wei Long Member

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    The best prevention for the "ratty collar" problem with t-shirts is the quality and ply thickness of the cotton. You can just do a simple test- if you can see your hand under the cotton, its cheap material. In general, ultra cheap brands like H&M fit great initially but after a few washes look like they went through WWII. No need to hang or air dry t-shirts either- that's really overkill for a workaday shirt. Just wash, tumble dry med/high as normal for cottons, then fold neatly under anything that could add some pressure to prevent wrinkles.

    Also it goes without saying that t-shirts do need some semi-regular replacement particularly if you're wearing them for work or any semi-casual use (like under a blazer).
     


  8. Tobes

    Tobes Active Member

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    Thanks for your reply. No hangers for the reason you mentioned (to prevent stretching) but may be the quality of the material, as suggested by Hung-Wei below.

    Thanks for your reply. I'll do that test. The majority of my t-shirts are from a cheap department store, as until recently I was under the common notion that cheaper = better. Well, no, not in all cases. However, I also dispute the notion that the most expensive = best, however that's a bit off topic.

    I wear t-shirts regularly, however I have purchased under-shirts (e.g. spandex-y gym wear type of garments) to prolong the t-shirts so they aren't necessarily washed with every use. However, I generally just wear those for special occasions. I may use them more often though.

    Regarding semi-replacement of t-shirts, can they be recycled? Just trying to think of the environment and not just 'throw things away' but recycle it. Clothing isn't necessarily the first thing people think of when it comes to recycling but it would be great if they could be.
     


  9. JLibourel

    JLibourel Distinguished Member

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    ^Discarded T-shirts can be most useful: They make excellent dust/cleaning/polishing rags. They are also good for applying shoe polish. I am sure other uses can be found for them as well.
     


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