Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by RSS, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    I have a rental house, and the current renter allows shoes downstairs (wood and tile) but not upstairs (carpet). To be fair, she keeps the house immaculate, so even I take my shoes off when I go upstairs - even if she's not around. She's relentless about that kind of thing and I don't want to discourage her from continuing this practice.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  2. rennavate

    rennavate Senior member

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    You guys really wear shoes inside homes? Really?
     
  3. Nicola

    Nicola Senior member

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    See how long things last if you're in an area with real winter. Slush is the obvious. But rock salt on the bottom of your shoes is worse then sand paper.

    But normal people would offer slippers if they're going to force guests to go bare.

    OTOH guests usually get special treatment so I'm more confused :embar:
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  4. gladhands

    gladhands Senior member

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    I hate, hate, hate being asked to remove my shoes or asking others to do the same. My wife is Korean, and she loathes the idea of wearing shoes indoors. We fought about wearing shoes in the house for years. Now that we have a baby who's learning to crawl, I have agreed to remove my shoes as soon as I enter the home, but we will not ask our guests to do so.

    The line-up -f shoes next to the door should serve as a hint. We do have three pairs of slippers to offer guests who are uncomfortable walking barefoot.
     
  5. fredrikkm

    fredrikkm Senior member

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    I live in Norway, and here, taking off your shoes inside is the norm. I only know like 2-3 people who always keeps their shoes on inside their homes. I guess it has something to do with the fact that it snows here 5 months a year...
     
  6. burningbright

    burningbright Senior member

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    What's the dog or pet situation like in a lot of these "no-shoe" homes?
     
  7. HughJ

    HughJ Senior member

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    There would have been consequences to wearing shoes in the house when I was growing up. Completely unheard of. This was a very European household in Canada. I didn't/don't find it odd, and further, I can't think of a home I've visited where this isn't the norm (often minus the slippers). Perhaps whoever speculated that this was a Canuck thing was correct.

    edit: I just remembered that I once dated an American girl whose family wore their shoes in the house. It wasn't a big deal to me......until I saw them put their feet up on the sofa. Ewww.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  8. viator

    viator Senior member

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    If you're going with a really light colored rug, you've got to be prepared to replace it.

    I also find it funny that OP's objection to this practice is due to his socks. Do you not wash your socks after every wear?
     
  9. james_timothy

    james_timothy Senior member

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    Their house, their rules; don't b*** and moan about it. But Will is right, there should be slippers available for those who want it.

    I grew up wearing shoes in the house. My wife didn't.

    Now of course, we don't wear shoes in the house. I love it; not having to wear shoes in the house is really nice.

    When we have guests over, most of them take their shoes off; we don't insist. Most often they notice that we aren't wearing shoes and follow suit.

    I have a RRL loving friend that is usually wearing boots when he comes over; we just don't make it an issue, and he asks
    apologetically if he can keep them on, and of course we always say yes.

    In the end, it just isn't a big deal. Different strokes for different folks and be glad of all the differences in the world.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  10. Knowledge is King

    Knowledge is King Senior member

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    wow, I'm surprised by the relatively one-sided responses in this thread. A few immediate thoughts:

    1) Not that this is solely a culturally driven issue, but none of you guys have ever been to asia or in an asian household?
    2) I can't imagine wearing my shoes around my apartment after walking around the sidewalks of New York.
    3) None of you guys live in an apartment with loud floors and people below you?
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  11. Holdfast

    Holdfast Senior member

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    I don't wear shoes at home apart from when getting dressed at the start of the day and then taking them off when I get back home. Having said that, I never object if others leave their shoes on (unless they're trailing large amounts of mud) but since I take mine off, most people notice and automatically remove theirs anyway without me having to say a word. It helps that I tend only to let considerate & pleasant people into my home in the first place who notice what a host is doing and out of politeness would automatically follow suit. When visiting others socially, I just follow the habit of the household, and don't much care either way.

    On another note, if I'm making a house call professionally, I always leave my shoes on unless specifically requested to remove them. Leaving aside an issue of maintaining professional boundaries, I visit some less than salubrious houses occasionally, and believe me, you sometimes really want that extra layer of protection between your feet and the floor! Also, there's occasionally the need to make a rapid exit, so having shoes on helps... Having said all that, if I don't expect to need to be leaving in a hurry and the house is nice/clean, and I see the person answering the door is shoeless, I will ask on entering as it's a free way of breaking ice/building rapport/showing respect which can set off the consultation on the right foot (if you'll pardon the pun). 99% of the time, when asked, people are polite and say "I don't mind, whatever".
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  12. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Yes, but unless you are visiting someone with a well-known and very strong cultural tradition of not wearing shoes in the house, it is precious beyond belief and bordering on rudeness. If you are having a party and you demand everyone remove their shoes, it is well over the the border.

    Removing shoes is a deep-seated cultural practice in some parts of Asia. But here's the kicker: Politeness is also a deep-seated cultural practice in some parts of Asia and, if you, as a westerner, are invited into someone's home, they will very often beg you not to remove your shoes as they know it is not customary for you and they place your comfort over theirs. What follows is a thoroughly satisfying ritual where you insist and they demur and, eventually, you leave your shoes by the door. Yes, it is some extra wear on your socks but that is a small price to pay. It is usually too hot to wear cashmere socks in Japan or India anyway.
     
  13. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Err, what line of work are you in, exactly?
     
  14. Master Squirrel

    Master Squirrel Senior member

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    As I stated, I grew up with this tradition and common practice. It was not enforced in my house, but in nearly every house in the neighborhood. I live in a wet northern climate where we get mud and slush and rock salt. Most people I know remove their shoes automatically when entering a home. Friends often ask me to remove my shoes all the time when entering their houses (when I forget) and there is no offense. As mentioned my hardwood floors are new. There are mats both inside and outside the doors (the basement door is the exception). Contractors wear booties or slippers or use the cellar door, but I've never asked them to do so. It is a part of our culture.

    I have a plastic mat for the wheelie chair at work that I clean myself. I have another for boots to catch the salt and grime in the winter.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  15. LeviMay

    LeviMay Senior member

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    In Canada, removing one's shoes is most certainly the norm. As a few have said above, guests may keep them on in a party or social situation, but the other 90% of the time, they come off.
     

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