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Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by RSS, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. burningbright

    burningbright Senior member

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    What's the dog or pet situation like in a lot of these "no-shoe" homes?
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. HughJ

    HughJ Senior member

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    There would have been consequences to wearing shoes in the house when I was growing up. Completely unheard of. This was a very European household in Canada. I didn't/don't find it odd, and further, I can't think of a home I've visited where this isn't the norm (often minus the slippers). Perhaps whoever speculated that this was a Canuck thing was correct.

    edit: I just remembered that I once dated an American girl whose family wore their shoes in the house. It wasn't a big deal to me......until I saw them put their feet up on the sofa. Ewww.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  3. viator

    viator Senior member

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    If you're going with a really light colored rug, you've got to be prepared to replace it.

    I also find it funny that OP's objection to this practice is due to his socks. Do you not wash your socks after every wear?
     
  4. james_timothy

    james_timothy Senior member

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    Their house, their rules; don't b*** and moan about it. But Will is right, there should be slippers available for those who want it.

    I grew up wearing shoes in the house. My wife didn't.

    Now of course, we don't wear shoes in the house. I love it; not having to wear shoes in the house is really nice.

    When we have guests over, most of them take their shoes off; we don't insist. Most often they notice that we aren't wearing shoes and follow suit.

    I have a RRL loving friend that is usually wearing boots when he comes over; we just don't make it an issue, and he asks
    apologetically if he can keep them on, and of course we always say yes.

    In the end, it just isn't a big deal. Different strokes for different folks and be glad of all the differences in the world.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  5. Knowledge is King

    Knowledge is King Senior member

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    wow, I'm surprised by the relatively one-sided responses in this thread. A few immediate thoughts:

    1) Not that this is solely a culturally driven issue, but none of you guys have ever been to asia or in an asian household?
    2) I can't imagine wearing my shoes around my apartment after walking around the sidewalks of New York.
    3) None of you guys live in an apartment with loud floors and people below you?
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  6. Holdfast

    Holdfast Senior member

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    I don't wear shoes at home apart from when getting dressed at the start of the day and then taking them off when I get back home. Having said that, I never object if others leave their shoes on (unless they're trailing large amounts of mud) but since I take mine off, most people notice and automatically remove theirs anyway without me having to say a word. It helps that I tend only to let considerate & pleasant people into my home in the first place who notice what a host is doing and out of politeness would automatically follow suit. When visiting others socially, I just follow the habit of the household, and don't much care either way.

    On another note, if I'm making a house call professionally, I always leave my shoes on unless specifically requested to remove them. Leaving aside an issue of maintaining professional boundaries, I visit some less than salubrious houses occasionally, and believe me, you sometimes really want that extra layer of protection between your feet and the floor! Also, there's occasionally the need to make a rapid exit, so having shoes on helps... Having said all that, if I don't expect to need to be leaving in a hurry and the house is nice/clean, and I see the person answering the door is shoeless, I will ask on entering as it's a free way of breaking ice/building rapport/showing respect which can set off the consultation on the right foot (if you'll pardon the pun). 99% of the time, when asked, people are polite and say "I don't mind, whatever".
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  7. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Yes, but unless you are visiting someone with a well-known and very strong cultural tradition of not wearing shoes in the house, it is precious beyond belief and bordering on rudeness. If you are having a party and you demand everyone remove their shoes, it is well over the the border.

    Removing shoes is a deep-seated cultural practice in some parts of Asia. But here's the kicker: Politeness is also a deep-seated cultural practice in some parts of Asia and, if you, as a westerner, are invited into someone's home, they will very often beg you not to remove your shoes as they know it is not customary for you and they place your comfort over theirs. What follows is a thoroughly satisfying ritual where you insist and they demur and, eventually, you leave your shoes by the door. Yes, it is some extra wear on your socks but that is a small price to pay. It is usually too hot to wear cashmere socks in Japan or India anyway.
     
  8. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Err, what line of work are you in, exactly?
     
  9. Master Squirrel

    Master Squirrel Senior member

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    As I stated, I grew up with this tradition and common practice. It was not enforced in my house, but in nearly every house in the neighborhood. I live in a wet northern climate where we get mud and slush and rock salt. Most people I know remove their shoes automatically when entering a home. Friends often ask me to remove my shoes all the time when entering their houses (when I forget) and there is no offense. As mentioned my hardwood floors are new. There are mats both inside and outside the doors (the basement door is the exception). Contractors wear booties or slippers or use the cellar door, but I've never asked them to do so. It is a part of our culture.

    I have a plastic mat for the wheelie chair at work that I clean myself. I have another for boots to catch the salt and grime in the winter.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  10. LeviMay

    LeviMay Senior member

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    In Canada, removing one's shoes is most certainly the norm. As a few have said above, guests may keep them on in a party or social situation, but the other 90% of the time, they come off.
     
  11. james_timothy

    james_timothy Senior member

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    no.
     
  12. Knowledge is King

    Knowledge is King Senior member

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    that's the first time I've heard anyone say that -- I've been into dozens of homes around Asia and never had that experience. I've witnessed the opposite numerous times though where Americans walk into the house and the family gasps trying to stop them.
     
  13. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    Visiting a persons home for the first time is a voyage into the unknown. Some homes are kept magnificently clean while others are left appalingly dirty.
    When invited, you should ask, 'is your home clean?' Do you have pets?, etc. You can always validate this question by adding that you have allergies to dust or pet fur, or even dirty people. Only a dirty or stupid person will be offended by this question, whereas a clean person will chuckle and assure you that their home is clean and probably ask, 'are you?'. Either way, you'll have properly qualified them (and they, you) before making a commitment, and in doing so, prevent an unpleasant experience.
    Where a person takes pride in their home and keeps it clean, including their floors, it should be immediately apparent to you when entering it. They have every right to insist that you remove your shoes when entering. This is their inner sanctum. In fact, they shouldn't have to ask. You should immediately make motion to remove your shoes. If they insist that it is not necessary, then keep them on. The fact that you have been invited to someones home is an honour for you and for them to receive you. The onus is on you to respect their ways when in their home. The onus on a host would be to invite you into a healthy and comfortable environment and, as per Wil's perfect suggestion; that the host offer you complimentary slippers, etc.

    If you are asked to remove your shoes in a clean home and you don't like it, it means your either a dirty varmant with stinky feet or an arrogant ass with no respect for yourself or others.
    If you are a clean person yet allowed to keep your shoes on in someones home, it means they are dirty varmants and you should run or brass it out that one time and never return.

    There are seriously legitimate concerns at hand here. God only knows what lays in the ground we walk on. Spit, urine, feces (human, animal or fowl), blood, chemicals, remains of rotten food or dead bodies (human or otherwise), dangerous microbes, insects, etc provide a minefield of potential health risks. Why anyone would track this into their homes or allow others to do so, is and will always be, beyond my understanding.
     
  14. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

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    I have a no shoes rule.......unless you are a bootay call and I am too tipsy to remember to ask you to take em off right away!
     
  15. reidrothchild

    reidrothchild Senior member

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    Growing up, we didn't necessarily have a no shoes in the house rule, it was just sort of a practice. It really doesn't make sense to me why people would sit around indoors with shoes on, but I guess that's a matter of personal preference. When I'm visiting someone, I always remove my shoes if the weather is bad and/or if the house is fully carpeted. If there's no inclement weather, I normally glance at the feet of my hosts and/or take a quick survey of their guests to see what the protocol is. When in doubt, I just begin to remove my shoes and wait to see if the hosts will tell me it's fine to leave them on. If you're worried about your socks being soiled, which are easily washable and cost next to nothing compared to even the cheapest flooring, imagine how your hosts feel about their carpet.
     
  16. Nicola

    Nicola Senior member

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    Normally the dogs go barefoot.
     
    4 people like this.
  17. Galix

    Galix Senior member

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    No shoes inside the house is the norm in Scandinavia. And I like it, specially when having people visiting, as it helps keeping the floor clean.
     
  18. gladhands

    gladhands Senior member

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    WTF? Sorry, dude, but that's offensive as fuck.
     
    2 people like this.
  19. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    ok varmant. :cloud:
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  20. Wes Bourne

    Wes Bourne Senior member

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    /thread
     

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