Horizontal buttonholes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Pink22m, Jan 25, 2004.

  1. Pink22m

    Pink22m Senior member

    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    I was noticing on my Etro shirt that the bottom buttonhole is horizontal. Both of my Faconnable shirts also have this feature. Is there any particular reason for this detail? Do Paul Smith shirts also have bottom buttonholes that are horizontal as well? What other brands do this?
     


  2. VMan

    VMan Senior member

    Messages:
    5,103
    Likes Received:
    25
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    I've noticed the same thing on my Armani shirts (collezioni and borgonuovo) as well. No clue on why its like that though.
     


  3. Carlo

    Carlo Senior member

    Messages:
    1,027
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    If it is vertical, then when you sew the button on you can have it not quite dead center without a problem. Use a Horizontal buttonhole on the sleeve gusset and you better nail the vertical placement perfectly - tells you that someone paid attention.
     


  4. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

    Messages:
    565
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2003
    I have my own theory which I haven't verified with any shirtmakers. Firstly, it is done to prevent the left and the right shirt-body shifting 1/4" up- or down-wards thereby ruining the pattern matching. Secondly, since the last button is usually tucked inside your pants, it is done horizontally so that the buttonhole will not be folded or squashed. You will noticed that Zegna Napoli Couture have the second-to-last buttonhole done horizontally for this reason, as that's the very buttonhole tucked under your waistband.

    Most buttonholes measures 5/8" plus-or-minus 1/16", except in Borrelli when the buttonholes measure only 1/2" even though the buttons are very stacked MOP. However, even though most of these buttonholes are 'wide', shifting of fabric is almost non-existent (I think). So maybe my theory is wrong altogether.

    Does Mr. Kabbaz's shirts have this feature?
     


  5. Carlo

    Carlo Senior member

    Messages:
    1,027
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    I misread - which is to say I just had a long conversation with my seamstresses about why I wanted the sleeve gusset hole horizontal instead of vertical. Naturlaut makes a good point and more or less the same one - a vertical hole requires a rough approximation, horizontal demands that you get it dead solid perfect.

    My Kabbaz's shirts utilize this on the sleeve for sure and the patterns match like they were one piece of fabric (damn him. he makes my RTW stuff look terrible).
     


  6. DandySF

    DandySF Senior member

    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    34
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I rely upon the single horizontal buttonhole at the bottom of the placket to let me know that there are no further buttons to button.  Because I start the buttoning from the top and work down, I've always appreciated this signal that my work is complete.  Clearly there are more technical reasons for the different buttonhole placement.
     


  7. unappliedscience

    unappliedscience Member

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    What I've heard is that it's a legacy of the traditional tailoring; the inside button of trouser was buttoned to the horizontal, bottom hole of the shirt so the shirt would stay tucked in. The practice is no longer used but shirt makers still adhere to the tradition. Or maybe it's just another marketing gimmick
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by