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Honing Japanese Chef's Knives

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by KJT, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. robin

    robin Senior member

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  2. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    Here is my take....
    I mostly agree with you but very few people finish their edges to finer than 1000 grit equivalent and for everyone else a ceramic rod makes for an improvement over the standard "medium" grooved steel.
     
  3. HitMan009

    HitMan009 Senior member

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    I mostly agree with you but very few people finish their edges to finer than 1000 grit equivalent and for everyone else a ceramic rod makes for an improvement over the standard "medium" grooved steel.

    Yes, a true statement! But if anyone is to invest in a japanese knife, one should definitely consider learning some sharpening skills. I tell you, there is such a calming quality to sharpening a knife. I find it to be such a great stress relief.
     
  4. GrillinFool

    GrillinFool Senior member

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    I have one of those glued whetstones. Works fantastic... Although for the OP, depending on the damage, I would recommend sending it off and having it professionally sharpened.

    And as bad as the damage seems it could be worse. Had a Halloween party at my place and someone accidentally tossed my Shun Santoku in the trash. Gone. My fave knife of my 5 shuns..
     
  5. HitMan009

    HitMan009 Senior member

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    And as bad as the damage seems it could be worse. Had a Halloween party at my place and someone accidentally tossed my Shun Santoku in the trash. Gone. My fave knife of my 5 shuns..
    WTF? Find that person and de-friend on Facebook NOW!!!!![​IMG]
     
  6. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    I have one of those glued whetstones. Works fantastic... Although for the OP, depending on the damage, I would recommend sending it off and having it professionally sharpened.

    And as bad as the damage seems it could be worse. Had a Halloween party at my place and someone accidentally tossed my Shun Santoku in the trash. Gone. My fave knife of my 5 shuns..


    It's crossed my mind - I very well may send it back to Shun for a free sharpening. But I figured this would be a good chance to learn to do it myself. I've wanted to learn it for a while but frankly was scared to mess up a good knife. Now's my chance!

    This is a Shun Santoku actually...
     
  7. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    Yes, a true statement! But if anyone is to invest in a japanese knife, one should definitely consider learning some sharpening skills. I tell you, there is such a calming quality to sharpening a knife. I find it to be such a great stress relief.
    You don't have to tell me. Besides my own, I have to sharpen all of my friends' and family's knives. It's not too much work since I selected and bought their knives for them. [​IMG]
     
  8. MikkoN

    MikkoN Senior member

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    Here.

    Check out other vids from this guy too. Very educational.

    I use 1000/6000 grit combination water stone and ceramic "steel" to keep my knives sharp.
    Personally I do not need anything else. Removing nicks using 1000 grit is a bit time consuming, but can be done.
    All my knives are japanese mid-level high-carbon blades.
    Nothing fancy, but good enough for me...and far superior to most Japanese knives usually available outside of Japan.
     
  9. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    Thanks for the videos. I've learned how to sharpen pretty well since posting this, but it's always helpful to see the technique.
     
  10. SField

    SField Senior member

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  11. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    I think that was a spam post, as it ressurrected a 2 year old thread.
     

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