Hong Kong Tailor- Empire Int'l Tailors- Help with the fit of my suit

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by robetrw006, May 12, 2013.

  1. robetrw006

    robetrw006 Member

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    Here are some photos I took of the trousers. These are the closest to dress shoes I have. Unfortunately, they'll have to do for further judging of the suit/trousers.

    One more thing I thought of when taking these photos. If I take in the pants, thus making them look more slim, won't that make me look even more top heavy? That is one of the main concerns I have with the suit; I look top heavy. I'm afraid further tailoring to the pants to make them slimmer fitting will accentuate this "top heavy" look even more. Anyone care to comment on this?

    Again, let me thank all of you who are providing your two cents. I'm very appreciative of you helping this poor college student(soon to be grad.) get his money worth out of this tailoring job!!!




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  2. robetrw006

    robetrw006 Member

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    No national suit cut I'm aware of either, I've just read recent articles published from reputable sources that say the traditional American business suit is a single vent suit. I've also read this has been the standard for a long time and the double vent suits have come into fashion in the past few years.

    If you believe this will help with the fit of the suit and is more suitable for my body type, then I'm all ears. I would like to hear the reasoning behind it being more suited to my body type though. Would you mind enlightening me? Thanks.
     


  3. Dib

    Dib Senior member

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    This is exactly why I say going to one of the cheaper tailors in HK is a false economy - almost every example I have seen has produced sub-par results. As with most things in life, you get what you pay for - at this price point I think most people are better off going RTW and then using a tailor to make alterations.

    OP - the jacket doesn't look horrendous when buttoned but looks less good when unbuttoned. It should definitely be longer and could do with more waist suppression, but I think the latter is difficult to achieve once the jacket has already been fully cut/made and is already a little tight at the back.

    The pants are a bigger problem - lots of gathering of fabric at the back, i'm surprised they let the trousers out of the store looking like that. Did you not notice the issue when you had fittings? In any case, take the trousers back and see what they can do about that (as in all honesty, you shouldn't have to accept trousers finished to those standards).

    Whilst the suit isn't perfect, I think it's still wearable until you are in a position to get something better. I would chalk it up to experience (in all honesty, this is how a lot of us learn about the tailoring process - trial and error).
     


  4. robetrw006

    robetrw006 Member

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    An expensive trail and error.

    I like to think all is not lost. It still looks better than the untailored RTW suit I wore prior to this. And considering I don't live in NYC, LA, or Chicago, I believe I will still look better suited than 95% of other American suit wearers, or at least that's what I like to think.

    I had read good things about Empire, I believe I even read a positive review of them in this forum. As said earlier, hindsight being 20/20, I wish I had stuck with Simpson Sin and paid the extra fee for canvassing. As you said, trial and error.

    Do you(OR ANYONE ELSE) have any specific recommendations for the pants? So far, from what I've heard, it seems like the main problem lays in the back of the legs in the thigh area; too much fabric. Do they need any work elsewhere?




    So far the list of things to mention at the tailor is as follows, please anyone and everyone speak up if there is something else I need to address:

    1) Take in the slacks in the thigh area (number one most important thing)

    2) Lengthen the jacket

    3) Inquire about widening the lapels slightly(if possible)

    4) Lower the button stance slightly. I'm thinking half an inch. Do others agree?

    5) Something with the waist... People seem to still be torn on this aspect. Some say more waist suppression, others say let the waist out. Knowing that I am a bit on the hefty side (I could stand to lose about 20-30 pounds), would the consensus be more or less waist suppression?
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013


  5. Dib

    Dib Senior member

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    OP - i appreciate you are a student and funds are limited at the moment, but I honestly think you have an unrealistic view of what the bespoke process actually involves. Often, even with accomplished tailors, you need to commission more than one suit to gradually improve the product and get to a suit you are happy with. Bespoke by its nature is an iterative process and involves a great deal of trial and error. It can be a risky process, even moreso if your budget is HK$4000! The price you have paid for the suit is not "expensive" (as I say, I appreciate you are a student, but you have to look at this relative to what bespoke suits cost generall - it is pretty much the cheapest you could expect to pay for a bespoke suit).

    With regards to your comment that you had read good reviews: FFS, I have read good reviews of Sam's! I have even seen them recommended by well known international magazines! Don't simply go on the basis of a few reviews (as they could also be written by people who don't know what they are talking about). You should choose a tailor based upon consistent results you have seen them achieve with your own eyes.

    I agree with you though, the suit is wearable and will look fine compared to what a lot of other people will be wearing when you start work back in the US.

    I don't know technically what they need to do to clean up the back of the pants, but i'm sure someone else on here will be able to give some views on that.

    Finally, the length of the pants look fine - although difficult to confirm until you actually go to the effort of sourcing some dress shoes to wear in your pics.
     


  6. kulata

    kulata Senior member

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    You don't have a huge seat so adding double vents will make the suit look more elegant and it will increase flexibility. The look you are trying to imitate is not for you as of this time. You can peruse the blog of a forum member that is relatively big and impeccably dressed for inspirations: www.ethandesu.com

    Good luck with your next commission and fyi, this attempt is not bad at all. Decent result.
     


  7. Dib

    Dib Senior member

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    Oh, i forgot to add, you can't lower the button stance on a completed suit - the button holes have already been cut
     


  8. robetrw006

    robetrw006 Member

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    Is this the fella who runs the blog? I recognize him from an Armoury video on shoes! (I hope it is ok to repost his photo!)

    In the photo below, he manages to have a very streamlined jacket, complete with what looks to be quite a lot of waist suppression, and you mention he is "relatively big." The smoothness of his silhouette(particularly in his chest-stomach-hip region) is exactly what I am going for, and exactly what I feel I don't have. I feel like someone placed a suit with no shape on me, put an invisible belt around my waist(see the green box in the photo in post #5), and pulled it tight. There is no flow.




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  9. Trompe le Monde

    Trompe le Monde Senior member

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    It is not all, or even mostly, on the tailor. The client has to be able to convey what he wants. And even before that, to *know* what he wants. Which is clearly (and frequently) not the case.

    "Make me slim" is not a reasonable request. And surely not commensurate with expectations of perfection.

    Further suppress the waist where it's already tight? Widening a lapel and lowering the buttoning point on a finished coast? (and just sew close the existing buttonhole?) In this case, one should sympathize with the tailor.

    Just another victim of being dressed by the internet...
     


  10. kulata

    kulata Senior member

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    You can also add higher armholes to your next spec and maybe slightly higher gorge if these can be executed correctly. It will add some shape
     


  11. Dib

    Dib Senior member

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    Trompe - I agree with what you say, to an extent.

    A tailor shoud be able to tell if the trousers are gathering at the back even if the client points it out or not. Further, a lot of the cheaper HK tailors crank out awful looking suits even for customers who know what they are talking about (I've seen many examples in HK).

    I do agree with your general sentiment though: not knowing much about bespoke tailoring + unrealistic expectations + using cheapest tailors = recipe for disaster
     


  12. bamboo

    bamboo Senior member

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    I am no expert, but it appears to me lapel width is a tad narrower compared to your shoulder width. It probably is a standard for "slim cut" suit, but may be exaggerating the volume of lower part of your torso. Actually, shoulders could have been slightly broader to achieve some kind of trimmed look and give a space for waist supression?
     


  13. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    probably an object lesson about cheap tailors:

    The coat
    is far too short - irretrievably
    The centre vent makes it look like a sack, side vents are far preferable but it cannot now be changed
    It requires some reduction at the waist - doable.
    Don't worry about the lapels - cannot really be changed.

    The trousers
    thighs to slim


    All this said many people in the street will not even notice and if they do will not be able to put a finger upon what is adrift. Wear it is in reasonable peace but go somewhere better next time.
     


  14. robetrw006

    robetrw006 Member

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    Ok, no one can seem to agree. The idea that there is too much fabric in the thighs(as can be seen in the shot of my back) was consensus until now. What makes you say "too tight?" It seems the complete opposite of what everyone else thinks.

    You also mention the coat is irretrievably short. The look I'm going for is not a 80s [laughably oversized] power suit. I'm looking for something conservative with a bit of a slim cut to it. Its why I didn't ask for a full blown slim suit. Perhaps our definitions of "slim" suits differ(you can see what I consider to be "slim" in the photo below). What I feel I have is a relatively conservative suit. Granted, I won't deny that the lapels should be slightly wider and the jacket length about an inch longer(but not "irretrievably" short).


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  15. kulata

    kulata Senior member

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    if this is what you were going for then you got it. Advise being given to you is how to get a suit that fits properly.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013


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