Home Made Sausage, Cured, and Smoked Meats

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Piobaire, Nov 7, 2009.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Kalua is what they call it and you should use banana and ti leaves to wrap the meat. I skip the liquid smoke.

    Just telling you how it was taught to me, by someone born and raised in Hawaii. I like to freeze the left overs and use it in other recipes too.
     


  2. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

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    Just telling you how it was taught to me, by someone born and raised in Hawaii. I like to freeze the left overs and use it in other recipes too.

    Me too - I just skip the liquid smoke cause I don't like the taste of it.
     


  3. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Me too - I just skip the liquid smoke cause I don't like the taste of it.

    Gotcha.

    Since getting my smoker, we've stopped doing it in this fashion and do a 12 hour or so run in the smoker. It's a little different, as the oven method does not develop "bark," and the real smoke is so much better tasting than liquid.
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I made garlic and italian sausage this weekend. Unfortunately, no pics.
     


  5. robertorex

    robertorex Senior member

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    I just made some butt with ektaylor's method. god damn is it great, and too easy too. I think next time I'll do some sort of mexican style carnitas marinade to get some other flavor out of it. <3 this thread
     


  6. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    well, a mexican-style marinade is sure a good idea, but technically, carnitas isn't marinated at all. it's chunks cooked slow (often in milk) until they're tender and the liquid evaporates and then they finish by frying in their own rendered fat. god i'm hungry just writing that.
     


  7. robertorex

    robertorex Senior member

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    well, a mexican-style marinade is sure a good idea, but technically, carnitas isn't marinated at all. it's chunks cooked slow (often in milk) until they're tender and the liquid evaporates and then they finish by frying in their own rendered fat. god i'm hungry just writing that.

    excuse my philistinism while I try and learn how to cook that [​IMG]
     


  8. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    gimme that emoticon!
     


  9. robertorex

    robertorex Senior member

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    [​IMG] edit: o wait that doesn't work. it's : drool :
     


  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    well, a mexican-style marinade is sure a good idea, but technically, carnitas isn't marinated at all. it's chunks cooked slow (often in milk) until they're tender and the liquid evaporates and then they finish by frying in their own rendered fat. god i'm hungry just writing that.
    My wife only learned two things from her paternal grandmother, and one of them, thankfully, was carnitas. The other were these little tortilla like things that you have to pinch hot. They practically peel your fingers off. I am not thankful for those.
     


  11. ektaylor

    ektaylor Senior member

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    Just got back from a holiday, and I'm back at it with another 5 pounds of pork butt. It's brining right now in 5 gallon mixture of salt, sugar, smoked paprika, cinnamon, cloves and pepper. Looking forward to putting it in the oven tomorrow.

    On another note, I plan to pick up some pork belly on Friday. I've never cooked belly before, does anyone have any reccomendations? Unfortunately, I don't have access to a smoker--just a range and oven.
     


  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    First off, you'll want to brine the pork belly as well. Change the brine depending on what kind of cook you want on the pork belly itself. There are several ways to do it.
    The best three, in my opinion, are roasted pork belly, pork belly confit, and braised pork belly. Of the three, braised is my favorite, but it's really up to you.

    For braised, I won't post a recipe, but I'll post ingredients and if you like the idea, you can use them to your own taste.

    In the brine, I would add some tamari, white peppercorns, palm sugar, coriander, garlic, and ginger.

    To actually braise the meat, get a leek, some ginger, garlic, honey, tamari, sake, rice wine vinegar sichuan peppercorn, clove, a stick of cinnamon, and some star anise. Oh, and you'll want some pork stock. If you don't have/can't find pork stock, just buy some kind of pork bones-- neck bones, shank bones, hell even the trotter, and fortify some chicken stock w/ the pork bones for a couple of hours. By all means, play around with this. You like yuzu? Add some. Maybe you want some fish sauce in there instead. Or maybe you want lime juice as the acid. Whatever sounds best.

    Sweat the leek, ginger, and garlic. Add the sake, let it reduce, add the rice wine vinegar, let it reduce, then add honey and all the spices (you'll want to toast the spices off in a separate pan first). Add the tamari, add the pork belly back in, and add pork stock until it just covers the meat. Put on your cartouche and let it simmer until it is tender. At a light simmer, it should take about 3 hours, obviously varying depending on the size of the actual meat. Finish it, let it cool, cut it into large cubes, and sear it on the skin side to order/for dinner.
    Also, if you would rather, you could sear the pork belly before braising, which is probably a more traditional way to braise, but then you don't get that really striking look of a big chunk of pork belly just absolutely crispy on the top.
     


  13. ektaylor

    ektaylor Senior member

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    Very nice, kwilkinson. I was thumbing around a few cook books, but I'm going try something like you posted. And thanks for reminding me of yuzu juice--I think I can actually find some at the corner Asian market by my house. I'll probably buy a bit more than I would for one night and make a confit on Saturday/Sunday to compare.
     


  14. whallyden

    whallyden Senior member

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    Smoked Turkey

    [​IMG]

    *Bonus* Turkey Liver Mousse

    [​IMG]
     


  15. ektaylor

    ektaylor Senior member

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    I finally made friends with the head (see: oldest) guy at my local butcher and got his card for "special requests." Apparently, the place can accommodate almost any cut of pork (taken from a primal cut, of course), blood, casings, skin left on, et cetera.

    Unfortunately, I'm moving from the area in a bit over a month and these rare and high quality ingredients will be far away. To compensate, I've decided that my eating agenda for next ~40 days will be to cumulatively eat an entire pig through deconstruction. Every edible piece, at least once.

    My question: where do I start--tail or jowl?
     


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