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Holes on leather/shearling after the needles (how resolve this problem)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Valerius1906, Dec 16, 2010.

  1. Valerius1906

    Valerius1906 Active Member

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    Hi to all SF forum members! I bought the shearling jacket (like on photo, but in black colour). It was with patch pockets on chest. I gave this jacket to a tailor to remove pockets. Pockets were removed, but there were holes after the needles. These holes are hardly noticeable, but in proper angel of light they are visible (see photos).
    Please, I need your (SF members [​IMG] , proffesionals tailors etc) proffesional help, how to repair/remove/hide this holes. [​IMG] Thanks a lot!!!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. texas_jack

    texas_jack Senior member

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    Honestly, what did you expect? Leather is skin. If I stuck you with a needle there would be holes too
     
  3. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Very Manton-esque ITG response, Jack.
     
  4. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm afraid, there is nothing you can do.

    Any hole in leather, cut by a needle or a pin will leave a permanent mark. Unlike a woollen cloth you cannot go over it with a steam iron and the holes will have disappeared. That's the reason why the operators on leather goods or shoes have to be highly skilled, one crooked seam and the piece is a reject.

    I am rather surprised that a professional tailor or even a seamstress took on the job to remove the pockets. S/he should have known, that this will happen.

    If the garment is reversible, wear it fur-side-out.
     
  5. texas_jack

    texas_jack Senior member

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    Very Manton-esque ITG response, Jack.

    Somebody's got to do it. Good news is I'm thicker skinned than Manton.
     
  6. lee_44106

    lee_44106 Senior member

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    It's not completely "removable", but try some similar color leather polish to see if you can minimize the look
     
  7. Valerius1906

    Valerius1906 Active Member

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    Thanks for bengal-stripe and lee_44106!!
     
  8. Valerius1906

    Valerius1906 Active Member

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    Please, more ideas! [​IMG]))) Thanks!
     
  9. Valerius1906

    Valerius1906 Active Member

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    Ideas for you to choose from:

    1) Get a sewing needle and randomly punch about 100,000 holes over the surface of that garment. When people ask you about it, tell them it's designed in Ukraine. This will work best if you speak like Borat. Mumble something about women dropping their panties.

    2) Wear this garment as-is. When people ask you about it, speak of bread lines and other Ukrainian austerity measures. Again, speak like Borat for best results.

    3) You can try using a leather conditioner to see if it makes the leather swell slightly and perhaps make those holes a little less obvious. I'm sure this won't be completely successful.

    4) There are flexible fillers used to repair leather damage to furniture and car seats. Never heard of this approach being used on clothing but I'm no expert. You might want to search around locally and/or on the Internet for more information.

    5) If I knew I weren't going to wear the garment otherwise and were ready to write it off, I might try spot filling and polishing that area with a matching shoe cream to see if I couldn't disguise the holes a bit. I'd test on a small hidden area first being trying this. It could end up uglier.

    6) Repair the damage by covering with new pockets.



    Thanks for funny ideas! [​IMG] I knew, that somebody offer return back the pockets! [​IMG]))))
     
  10. NORE

    NORE Senior member

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    A meat tenderiser should sort that quickly.
     
  11. iroh

    iroh Senior member

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    Looking for solutions for this too.
     
  12. NORE

    NORE Senior member

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    I answered that question already. See above. Alternatively you may wish to use the material from the pockets that were removed and make a series of shearling plugs with which to fill the holes. Similar to the carpentry procedure. YMMV.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  13. celery

    celery Senior member

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    Well, I have a bit of a quick hack job solution for you if you're desperate to minimize their visibility.

    [​IMG]
    Here I made some fairly good sized holes using a diamond punch in some soft lambskin.

    [​IMG]
    Using some eco-flo leather glue I coated the area where I made holes (I recommend working in small section because you want to wipe off excess before it dries!).

    [​IMG]
    Here you can see that I wiped off the top layer of glue. I just used a regular paper towel, you should not use anything that comes apart (like a q-tip) so you don't get left over strands sticking to the leather.

    [​IMG]
    After waiting a few minutes for the glue to dry, I used a paper towel to rub the area with Fiebings leather dye.

    [​IMG]
    Here it is after a couple minutes to dry, the holes are quite minimized.


    So, it's not the most graceful fix, but it's something.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. iroh

    iroh Senior member

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    Damn that is ghetto!
     
  15. celery

    celery Senior member

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    You're welcome to use this method iroh, it's almost as good as your sock fix.
     
  16. iroh

    iroh Senior member

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    My leather jackets all have a smooth grain. It would be best if I purchased a new hide and resewed the jacket.

    However if you have a method for fixing smooth leather I am all ears. God Bless Him Obama The President Of These United States.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  17. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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  18. NORE

    NORE Senior member

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    This is awesome in so many ways. So many.
     
    1 person likes this.

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