Hip-hop culture hurting NFL

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by mr monty, Oct 18, 2007.

  1. kakemono

    kakemono Senior member

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    I dont think hiphop culture is the problem. Hiphop was fine when it originated. Its the same hiphop.

    The problem is not in the NFL or the hiphop culture. It is the same problem that plagues the USA now. A general lack of discipline and Too much political correctness. We are so worried about making poeple feel uncomfortbale / offended that we sugar coat everything and noone grows up.

    There are too many 29 year old kids who don't know how to conduct themselves because they were never made to mind parents or teachers or any authority figures.

    Here is one I will take flak for though... In my opinion (this is my opinion - so dont argue or I will be offended and/or cry and claim you are a bully)... but I thin the degredation of the faimly and home is THE problem. High divorce rate / kids out of marriage leaves too many kids without a dominant father figure. This means that the young males never learn how to conduct themselves as a man and become a gentleman - and also, women don't know what to expect in a man.
     


  2. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

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  3. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    What's this called?
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG] Is this a trick question? That looks like a MAINSTREAM loofa....
     


  4. HomerJ

    HomerJ Senior member

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    Looks to me like a large penis skinned, cut in thirds, and dried.
     


  5. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    Clever, astute and handsome, what other attributes are you hiding.

    No need to get personal JP. I'm sorry you find my views on MAINSTREAM hip-hop so objectionable. It's only music, you know. If the violence and misogyny don't bother you, then more power to you!

    BTW, I'm a good dancer, too.
     


  6. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    [​IMG] Is this a trick question? That looks like a MAINSTREAM loofa....

    It was a trick question, but you got it right and proved you're not O'Reilly, who thinks it's called a "falafel":

    4) "So anyway I'd be rubbing your big boobs and getting your nipples really hard, kinda' kissing your neck from behind...and then I would take the other hand with the falafel thing and I'd just put it on your p***y but you'd have to do it really light, just kind of a tease business..." --as quoted in a sexual harassment suit filed against him by a Fox News producer, 2004 (Source)
     


  7. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

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    It was a trick question, but you got it right and proved you're not O'Reilly, who thinks it's called a "falafel":

    4) "So anyway I'd be rubbing your big boobs and getting your nipples really hard, kinda' kissing your neck from behind...and then I would take the other hand with the falafel thing and I'd just put it on your p***y but you'd have to do it really light, just kind of a tease business..." --as quoted in a sexual harassment suit filed against him by a Fox News producer, 2004 (Source)


    [​IMG]

    Omfg that is too funny. I better be careful next time I feel like having a quick falafel, lest some right wing TV nut tries doing the squelchy on me utilising a Loofah Operculata [​IMG]
     


  8. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    I understand the merengue culture used to be a real problem in Chicago.

    lawyerdad, i want to be you when i grow up.
     


  9. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    lawyerdad, i want to be you when i grow up.

    [​IMG]

    Can I be Fuuma?

    Or maybe Huntsman, I can't decide.
     


  10. mizanation

    mizanation Senior member

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    romafan. this is the problem. you blame everything on hip hop which is a cultural phenomenon created in and by the hood. it's a reflection and result of what goes on in the hood.

    the problems that some black athletes get into are not a result of hip hop. it's a result of whatever they went through that made them make poor decisions--this could be a number of things like poverty, crime and drug infested neighborhoods, racism, troubled family life, etc. for some, professional sports are the ticket out of this situation.

    some of these young men grew up with nothing and are now given millions of dollars and fame, literally overnight--while still in their teens or early 20's.

    so, oj simpson, who keeps getting into trouble, is he the result of evil hip hop? he was a member of gangs and had a horrible childhood, way before hip hop was even invented. he had already retired from a successful professional football career before people even heard of hip hop.

    how about lebron james, at 22, he is someone who is incredibly mature and is a role model for not just young black athletes but all young athletes. he IS hip hop. he is a part of hip hop culture and hip hop is a huge part of him. by your argument, he should be in jail or fighting pitbulls.

    do you see why the "hip hop is destroying america" argument is complete b.s.?


    if you want to stop anyone, not just some black professional athletes, from making shitty decisions, you're gonna have to fix the roots of the problem. these are a poor education system, poverty, joblessness, racism, crime, drugs, broken families, etc.

    hip hop is a response and reaction to this. but people are calling it the cause.
     


  11. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    I understand the merengue culture used to be a real problem in Chicago.

    A meringue problem?

    [​IMG]
     


  12. fortune

    fortune Senior member

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    Heh. Maybe I clouded my point. Not all hip-hop artists talk about drugs, sex, money, gangs, and the rest that goes along with your view Roma. Louis Logic, Cage, El-P, Aesop Rock, KRS-One, Atmosphere, and many more, are all good artist that for much of their rhymes/songs, refrain from a lot of what you've said hip hop is about. I'd like to know what artists you're basing your views on, if you don't mind. While I do agree that a lot of it is ridiculous and unneeded, I also think you're saying this based off of one sub-genre or group of artists.
     


  13. Edward Appleby

    Edward Appleby Senior member

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    Even hip-hop artists who do talk about drugs, sex, and violence aren't part of the problem. They're simply reflecting the environment they grew up in. The problem is that most Americans don't give a shit.
     


  14. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim In Time Out

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    While we're at it, we might as well get rid of Rock music, Jazz, and everything else thats ever been blamed for the downfall of society.

    Oh, and video games!

    And violence on television.

    the list goes on and on.
     


  15. Quirk

    Quirk Senior member

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    Even hip-hop artists who do talk about drugs, sex, and violence aren't part of the problem. They're simply reflecting the environment they grew up in.
    I think the artists and music do reflect an existing problem, but don't you think they perpetuate it as well? They wouldn't have as much influence if the audience had a steady diet of alternative messages, but pop culture loves a moral vacuum. I also think a large part of the problem is the amoralists who do their part to legitimize it by making it accessible though mainstream media channels. It's all about the Binjamins, yo.
    The problem is that most Americans don't give a shit.
    Some people perceive attempts to address social pathologies as some sort of bleeding-heart liberal cause. Screw that. I am simply not interested in the creation of thugs, walking the street looking to "jack" me to pay for "joolery", and I do not want uneducated, unemployable layabouts making babies that my tax dollars will end up subsidizing one way or the other. MY life -- MINE -- is much better if they're employed, productive, civilized, law-abiding, tax-paying respectful members of society. Preferably well-attired, but that's not a dealbreaker. Keep your compassionate conservatism. Give me mutually-self-interested pragmatism. Gotta run -- La Bella Bellucci is calling....
     


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