Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

hiking/backpacking

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by jett, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. greger

    greger Senior member

    Messages:
    1,470
    Likes Received:
    192
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2009
    Location:
    WA
    One person that I know likes to hike with teva's and carry his mountaineering boots and crampons, etc. on and in his 80-90 pound frameless pack. Trails only go so close to mountains or part way up them, so Teva's are fine until he needs the crampons. Me, I like "tennis shoes" or mountaineering boots, but usually something inbetween towards the lighter side. Gore tex is nice for any outdoor shoe. Backpacking is something I rarely did, since I like day hikes, which have included mountain tops.

    Clothes- what time of year makes a difference. Light weight hiking pants and shorts are nice for summer, with tie shirt and cotton flannel for layer. If a light rain your energy will produce enough heat to evaporate the wet from the rain. Colder times of year wool pants are nice. Believe Fred Beckey would buy wool slacks for mountaineering. Knowing how to use clothes and shoes separates the "die hard" from the "city slicker" "dude". Know hypothermia symptoms. Should know something about foods, too. Sugar burns real quick and then no engery. Foods like green beans last about two hours, even burning. Fatty stuff and cheese is slow burning, but last a long time and takes awhile to get started (doesn't have the energy that green beans has because it is suggish, but slow and constant, but doesn't make the body agile). Higher elevations can get very cold in the evenings. One last piece of advice, eat a slice of cheese or some hamburger before you go to bed if it is going to be cold in the morning.
     


  2. JacobJacob

    JacobJacob Senior member

    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    I have worked i the guiding field (mostly on glaciers and mountains but also on week long trips over flat terrain. For the latter, not much though). My experience tells that when you are buying a new pack, avoid anything that looks 'complicated'. A good pack is trimmed down, light and specialized (imo, it is better to have a couple of packs to choose from instead of just one multi purposed 'pizza with extra cheese' pack. - Something to consider if you by now already know you are gonna hike a lot).

    If you are going on one to two days trips, 40, 45 or 50 L. is preferable. Just a 40 L. can hold much more than one expect. I also recommend you to get a camelback for water. I never ever carry my water or anything else outside or strapped onto the pack (unless it can't be avoided, as it often can't be with, say, ropes). And also... A pack in a brigt coulur scheme is preferable. It makes it much easier to find whatever is stuffed inside and, should an accident occour, to find you.

    But the first thing you need to do is figure out your specific needs. Write them down on a piece of paper as tjek list. You then have to look at a bunch of different packs, read reviews and such (make a post on SF). When it finally comes to trying out a pack don't just walk around with it in the store. Move the arms, the hip and jump a little bit on the spot.. You'll look like an idiot, but remember this is the only shot you'll have for getting it right.
    Personally, I choose packs for climbing/skiing/mountaineering as they usually gives room for more fluid movements.
    Beside this, remember to always, always look at the stitchings and pull them in opposite directions. If they look like something that can't take a lot of wear and tear, well, that is probably the case. If there are tons of stitches all over the pack, keeping it together, it just means that more things can fail. So again, keep it neat and trimmed down to the minimum. The lesser complicated the pack is, the longer it will last. The same goes for the material - you have to make up your own mind about it. Don't trust the company/salesman. Athough the light weigt fabrics they are using theese days is said to be durable and able to take some good beatings, there is one problem. The lighter it gets, the thinner it will also be and sharp objects can cut through it much easilier. That is a fact! Again you have to examine the pack and feel the fabric between your fingers.

    The best packs on the market right now are probably the ones from Arcteryx and Black Diamond. Personaly I prefer BD.

    About footwear, everything is already said by the other posters. I use LaSportiva and have nothing to complain about. Scarpa I know is also very solid.
     


  3. word

    word Senior member

    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Osprey makes good packs. I see their Atmos model the most. Don't know much about the Aether though. Hip belts are great, good packs when loaded properly will keep the weight off your shoulders and on your hip. So the belt is essential to keeping it stable on uneven terrain.

    Put a heavy duty sewing needle & some thread in your gear btw. It may never happen, but you'll be able to do a makeshift repair on a torn pack on the spot.

    As far as your ultralight or traditional question from a few months back. Just figure out what works for you through experience. After a trip inventory your gear and remove what unnecessary non-essentials you had. That's the best way to save weight. Always have weight in mind when making purchases too. For example, I'll avoid buying a pair of hiking pants that weigh more than 350-375g.

    My own gear is mostly ultralight, but my maximum base weight is only average (20-25lbs dep on time of year and trip length). I use the weight savings from ultralight gear to bring more non-essential items to make my trip more fun or comfortable. Some people simply need more to be comfortable while backpacking. Others can get away with less.

    Sleeping bag and maybe shelter system are the primary gear categories where you usually spend good money to get really lightweight gear. My bag is a Western Mountaineering Ultralite, worth every penny. My shelter is a Tarptent Contrail. My pack, a Kifaru Zulu g2, is heavier than what most people use since Kifaru packs are made for hunting or tactical purposes. But I don't mind since it's awesome. I use it for more than just recreational backpacking.

    Footwear should be chosen based on the weight you're carrying and terrain you are going on. Lightweight packs on maintained trails call for trail running shoes. Hiking off the beaten path requires sturdy boots with good ankle protection. I use inov-8 trail runners and add gaiters and rocky goretex socks for nasty weather. Shoes with Goretex I hate with a passion. Goretex fabric does not breathe well under heavy exertion. For jackets this is OK because you have pit-zips and the front zipper to ventilate. Or you can simply take it off. With shoes you can't unzip or take them off and continue going. If you undo the laces a lot, good luck walking very far at a good pace. You're stuck with swampy feet. The socks can be removed. [​IMG]
     


  4. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

    Messages:
    14,187
    Likes Received:
    1,937
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    I've got this but only used it once. I've been meaning to sell it.

    [​IMG]
     


  5. shakurlife2

    shakurlife2 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    I've got this but only used it once. I've been meaning to sell it.

    [​IMG]


    wow looks nice
     


  6. Mauby

    Mauby Senior member

    Messages:
    1,110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 17, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago, IL USA
    just bought an Osprey Aether 60 today. Anyone have experience with the custom molded hipbelts?

    They seem kinda gimmicky but I've never personally used them. Hey, if it works for you, great.
     


  7. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Location:
    In the woods
    This thread is weak.


    Anyone a hammock camper here? I have never been fond of sleeping on the ground and it seems like the benefits of a good hammock outweigh those of a tent. Can anyone weigh in on this?
     


  8. Superfluous Man

    Superfluous Man Senior member

    Messages:
    515
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Osprey makes good packs. I see their Atmos model the most. Don't know much about the Aether though. Hip belts are great, good packs when loaded properly will keep the weight off your shoulders and on your hip. So the belt is essential to keeping it stable on uneven terrain.
    I liked their old stuff a lot better than their newer releases. Then again I carry more stuff than most due to the conditions I travel in so maybe for a lightweight packer the new stuff is great. Your Kifaru is a great pack for sure; I own a Kifaru Late Season G2 and I really like it for weekend banzai trips. This year I'm trying Arc Teryx and Mystery Ranch packs and I don't think my Kifaru will get much use [​IMG]. I'm a bit of geek for packs and backpacking gear in general. Also, Re: GORE Tex...There is no such thing as a waterproof shoe; if the shoe is shielded from external moisture that means internal moisture will be prevalent. I've learned to get over having wet feet but I still can't stand hot feet, so no GORE Tex products for me.
     


  9. oroy38

    oroy38 Senior member

    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    I'm a big fan of Kifaru packs. The stuff they make is geared more towards the military but the stuff is ridiculously rugged, customizable, and absolutely the most comfortable packs I've ever used. Their packs are pretty expensive, though, but you get what you pay for. www.kifaru.net As for boots, I've tried several. Everything from Danner, to Vasque, to Lowa. The best boots my feet ever touched were Hanwag. Best damn boots on the market, but they come at a price. The price, however, pales in comparison to the likes of Edward Green and such. With this gear, I've never had any unusual discomfort apart from the usual aches that build up after days of carrying a ruck through rough terrain for 2 weeks or more.
     


  10. Superfluous Man

    Superfluous Man Senior member

    Messages:
    515
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    I'm a big fan of Kifaru packs. The stuff they make is geared more towards the military but the stuff is ridiculously rugged, customizable, and absolutely the most comfortable packs I've ever used. Their packs are pretty expensive, though, but you get what you pay for.

    www.kifaru.net

    As for boots, I've tried several. Everything from Danner, to Vasque, to Lowa. The best boots my feet ever touched were Hanwag. Best damn boots on the market, but they come at a price. The price, however, pales in comparison to the likes of Edward Green and such.

    With this gear, I've never had any unusual discomfort apart from the usual aches that build up after days of carrying a ruck through rough terrain for 2 weeks or more.


    +1 on HanWag. I currently use the Canyon II's for light jaunts and Tatras for the heavier stuff. Love how tough they are yet comfortable and supportive; they are the first boots I've owned that did not need Superfeet replacement insoles!
     


  11. oroy38

    oroy38 Senior member

    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Nice! I run the Mountain Light GTX. The boot does almost everything really well, though it's not so great for hotter weather.
     


  12. Superfluous Man

    Superfluous Man Senior member

    Messages:
    515
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Nice! I run the Mountain Light GTX. The boot does almost everything really well, though it's not so great for hotter weather.

    I had those last year. Incredibly supportive boots and they wore like iron but indeed they were very very hot. My feet were sweating even when the temperatures were in the mid-30's. I ended up virtually giving them away on eBay for $100 or so [​IMG]
     


  13. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Location:
    In the woods
    Anyone have any recommendations for planning a first overnight trip?

    Also, on average, how big of a pack would be necessary for 4-7 days? Right now my pack is 60 liters and 3,700 cubic inches.
     


  14. Milpool

    Milpool Senior member

    Messages:
    921
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2010
    Anyone have any recommendations for planning a first overnight trip?

    Also, on average, how big of a pack would be necessary for 4-7 days? Right now my pack is 60 liters and 3,700 cubic inches.


    1) Take less than you think you need, and you'll still be overpacked. Water is the main thing. You can live overnight without eating, so don't worry too much about food. A bag of candies, some pb&j sandwiches, granola or energy bars, tea or coffee, and you are set for a long overnighter. No need to cook any of that, and so you don't need the weight of a stove and fuel. Eat a huge breakfast before you start and eat a huge dinner when you get back. Simple.

    2) 4 to 7 days where and in what weather? Mild summer weather in flat terrain, you can get away with barely anything. I know people that would have plenty of room to spare in a pack like that because they stay in California in nice weather.

    4 to 7 days in a Canadian winter for ice fishing is a different story entirely. Your pack would be a day pack for that kind of a trip.
     


  15. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

    Messages:
    4,325
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Location:
    In the woods
    1) Take less than you think you need, and you'll still be overpacked. Water is the main thing. You can live overnight without eating, so don't worry too much about food. A bag of candies, some pb&j sandwiches, granola or energy bars, tea or coffee, and you are set for a long overnighter. No need to cook any of that, and so you don't need the weight of a stove and fuel. Eat a huge breakfast before you start and eat a huge dinner when you get back. Simple.

    2) 4 to 7 days where and in what weather? Mild summer weather in flat terrain, you can get away with barely anything. I know people that would have plenty of room to spare in a pack like that because they stay in California in nice weather.

    4 to 7 days in a Canadian winter for ice fishing is a different story entirely. Your pack would be a day pack for that kind of a trip.


    Good call I forgot to mention that. Most of the hiking I plan on doing will be in spring to early fall in the northeast.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by