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hiking/backpacking

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by jett, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. suited

    suited Senior member

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    What size pack are you going with for a 20-mile overnighter during summer conditions?
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  2. VaderDave

    VaderDave Senior member

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    I'll probably just use my REI 50L Flash. It's the same pack I usually use for anything where I have to carry a tent and a sleeping bag. I used it last summer on our hike through Desolation. It's what I will use on this 50-miler as well.

    We're talking about fastpacking the overnighters, with a car showing up with all our overnight gear at a campsite. If we do that, then we'll just carry essentials (water, some food, first aid, etc.) in our Camelbaks. I have a Peak Bagger that is probably about 18L that works perfectly for day hikes (and this would essentially be two day hikes in a row).

    If I want to split the difference, I have a small Fjallraven rucksack (with minimalist frame but no padded hipbelt) that can hold a ultralight sleeping bag, a pad, and a bivy sack along with some food and water. I've used that on a couple of overnight backpacking trips and it has been a fun change of pace.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  3. suited

    suited Senior member

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    I was looking for a 4-season pack that could handle voluminous gear for winter mode, and decided to get the Arc'teryx Altra 85. I considered going with something smaller (the Altra also comes in a 65 and 75 liter version) but figured I'd rather have the extra space than wish I had opted for something larger. The weight difference between the empty packs is minimal. The Altra is supposed to be one of the most comfortable packs ever made, so my expectations are high. It was on sale for 20% off retail.

    I also came upon a military sleep system for free. It's a neat piece of surplus gear. I don't think I'll ever use the entire system for backpacking (it weights ~10lbs), but the gore-tex bivy and possibly the patrol bag would certainly be doable.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2016
  4. VaderDave

    VaderDave Senior member

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    Bump. We've set the date for July 21-23. We will be starting at Echo Lake and hiking the Tahoe Rim Trail counter-clockwise to Spooner Lake on the east side of the Tahoe Basin. I'm looking forward to three days of light packs and big miles. We'll have a support vehicle meet us each night (no wilderness sections this time) and have huge evening feasts and bonfires. :slayer:
     
  5. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    Are you in the Bay Area? What troop are you with?
     
  6. VaderDave

    VaderDave Senior member

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    I'm in El Dorado Hills, outside of Sacramento (on the way to Placerville). Our troop number is 558. We're an LDS troop.
     
  7. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    This seems an appropriate place to put this - is anyone watching Alone on History?

    Ten people dropped off into the wilds of BC, spaced out with 5 miles between them, minimal gear and no camera crews. Last person standing wins 500K. The winner of S1 went 55 days.

    Interesting to watch how quickly isolation takes its toll.

    Oh, and Camp and Trail (1907) by Stewart Edward White is one of the better books on common sense trail wilderness life.

    lefty
     
  8. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    We were with Troop 14 in Albany for a minute.


    I'll have to check it out, I'm a sucker for that sort of crap. But as these shows get ever more dangerous I can't help flashing to Climbing For Dollars.
     
  9. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    There's a movement toward less producer-manufactured shows growing. This seems pretty good to my eye on the source level, but it's still cut for drama.

    These are experienced survivalists who are tapping out left and right, in many cases due to animal sounds at night. Vancouver Island is filled with black bears, some wolves, and enough cougars to be wary, but I doubt anyone going down from an attack. But anyone who's spent time alone in the woods knows that a chipmunk can sound like a rhino at night.

    I've only seen half of each season. What's interesting to me are the guys who realize that it's not a traditional survive situation where you have to keep yourself alive for two weeks until rescue, but more of a pioneering one where you have to build a sustainable life. Set up a source for treated water, sort your fire out, lay out a gill net and traps, and then build. Some of these camps are amazing.

    Then the loneliness comes in. I believe they do have to check in daily via some type of messaging GPS system. And they are visited weekly by crew to change out camera batteries and get new cards. 55 days is a hell of a long time to be alone with nothing more that an hour visit every week.

    You can stream on History.

    lefty
     
  10. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Six episodes into the S1. Eight days of elapsed time. Six guys have tapped out. Half because the night is filled with terror. Youtube tough guy "survivalists" turned into weeping children after a week of rain, cold, and isolation.

    It's interesting that they put them on Vancouver Island in a dense rain forest. Had they not been wet the entire time a few may have hung in there. One guy just built a boat. I know he doesn't win, but I hope he places second.

    lefty
     
  11. suited

    suited Senior member

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    Yes. I watched the first season as it aired, watching season 2 now. Season 1 was the real opportunity to grab $500K. It will be much harder to win this time around, or at least it should be. Participants have the luxury of seeing the mistakes/strategies during season 1, and there's more experience among them. Each season should, in theory, be more difficult to win - assuming skill levels remain the same and it stays on Vancouver Island.

    I'd like to see a change of scenery but I imagine picking a location is difficult. The environment needs to be harsh enough to prevent the show from lasting too long (even with heavy editing), but sustainable enough to allow participants to survive for a reasonable amount of time. You almost certainly need the threat of wild animals to drive ratings. Rattle snakes won't cut it, but brown bear country is probably out of the question.

    Looks like they're carrying Kelty Red Cloud 110s (could also be the 90 liter pack).
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2016
  12. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    I believe this is a Canadian production so they were limited to Canada. The weather is a real killer, but had they shot in a more hospitable area they still be there as you say. The other area that comes to mind is Labrador. The black files there would drive them screaming from the bush.

    There's talk of them going to Patagonia next season.

    Certainly does help having seen S1 - gill net, axe, saw, ferrio, cordage and extra food. That leaves 4 items for fun.

    Side note - I'm up at my camp and just saw a Fisher. Rare sighting and my first.

    lefty
     
  13. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Went for a little hike this weekend, just an eight mile or so loop. Loaded up my day pack (Greggory Z30) with some baguette, cheese, meats, and an ice cold bottle of rose (Lie Dets) using my roll up ground blanket to keep the bottle cold. Hung my Kelty Noah's 12 tarp off the bottom of the pack. We found a nice place a ways off the marked trail and it took me all of 10 minutes to have us nicely protected from the sun, sitting comfy on the ground blanket, and could enjoy a nice snack out in the boonies.

    Very pleasant.
     
  14. suited

    suited Senior member

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    Here are a bunch of pictures from two hikes in CO, in no particular order. The first hike was a little more challenging than we expected - the terrain was fairly rough and steep. Most of the people we passed had camped at the top for the night. It was doable as a day hike but you had to move quickly. I decided it was best to turn back before finishing because I wanted to make sure we made it to the car before the sun went down. My wife is only 5'1 and has never hiked before, so she moved about 1/2 or 1/3 of my pace. I had a 2-person bivvy for emergency use and fire equipment, but no tent or gear that would make camping anything but a last resort.

    Besides the obvious equipment like my pack and boots, the most useful item was the shemagh, shown here on top of my Mystery Ranch pack. It's widely used in the survival and military communities, but I always considered it a bit tacticool. I'd never hike without one again. Its uses are limited only by your imagination. It came into its own when I soaked it in the crisp water of the creeks, wrung it out and hung it around my neck. It provided the perfect amount of relief even though it was not terribly hot. In July it would have been a godsend. A bandana can suffice but this is much better.

    I was surprised by how many people were willing to hike in without any medical equipment or basic supplies. Of course they were favoring less weight as a tradeoff, but some people had nothing but water. I suppose I'm looking at this through the eyes of someone who is usually overly prepared. I brought a LifeStraw and just before trying it out in a creek I saw someone fill their water bottle and drink it. I guess they thought water must be free of pathogens as long as it looks clean. I suppose the risk is relatively low, but I can't think of a better way to ruin a vacation than giardia. The LifeStraw proved useful even in a non-emergency situation. It allowed me to rehydrate from the creek (with water much colder than what was left in my 2L bladder) without depleting the water we were carrying. There was no plastic taste at all.

    The second hike on the following day was much more pleasant. We were a little beat up from the day before, but managed to complete it with no problem. We saw some moose to boot.

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2016
    2 people like this.
  15. VaderDave

    VaderDave Senior member

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    Beautiful. Thanks for posting!
     
  16. Fueco

    Fueco Senior member

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    Pictures of the views near the high points of our hikes the past two days. First one is from Upper Dewey Lake (above Skagway, AK). Second is from the Sheep Creek Trail in Kluane National Park (Yukon Territory).

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    3 people like this.
  17. Scelerat

    Scelerat Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Makes my views of the Maumturks and the Twelve Bens look pedestrian.....[​IMG]
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    1 person likes this.
  18. norcaltransplant

    norcaltransplant Senior member

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    From my last major vacation... I'm more of a photographer than hiker. From the summit of Dalsnuten, near Sandnes/Stavanger, Norway [​IMG] River and waterfall between Myrdal and Flam, Norway [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
    5 people like this.
  19. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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  20. Fueco

    Fueco Senior member

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    Plain Of Six Glaciers, above Lake Louise (Banff National Park, Alberta).

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.

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