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hiking/backpacking

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by jett, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. Kai

    Kai Senior member

    Messages:
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    Aug 16, 2003
    thanks kai. I keep seeing people recomending to not go with full on hiking boots so I will definitely check out hiking shoes instead. I just worry about ankle support with a pack on. I'm used to wearing heavy duty workboots so even relatively heavy hiking boots don't feel bad, but I do really like the idea of minimizing weight wherever possible. I hope to avoid snow as much as possible, at least for the next year or two.

    Re: Packs, do you have any experience with the Naos line from Arcteryx? It's crazy expensive, but I like the idea of a waterproof bag and it's not too heavy. The other bag I'm really looking hard at is the Osprey Aether (the current model, not the older pad-framed one). The whole ultralight movement seems a bit excessive to me, but I can definitely see the appeal in trying to get your base weight as low as possible.


    I've seen the Naos packs, but never used them. Pretty much anything Arcteryx makes is top flight, so if it fits you, you will probably like it.

    I'm not an ultralight packer, but I do incorporate some of the ultralight doctrine to keep pack weight down as much as possible.

    To give you an idea of my current thinking on pack gear, here's a list of gear I'm taking on a 6 day trip next week. The trip is at relatively high elevation, following the continental divide in Colorado's Weminuche wilderness.

    Personal Gear
    Leatherman micro tool
    3 liter water bladder
    Petzl Zipca Headlamp
    Two Lighters
    sunscreen
    Insect Repellent. (Ultrathon brand, spray).
    Compass\t
    Map
    Altimeter watch
    Kelty Cloud backpack
    Marmot Hydrogen sleeping bag
    Z-rest rest 3/4 length sleeping pad.
    Oricaso bowl
    Lexan spoon
    Titanium cup with lid
    Toothbrush
    Small tube of toothpaste
    small Pack Towel
    First aid kit
    Duct tape wrapped around a half a pencil.
    Hiking poles
    Digital camera with extra battery
    travel pack of baby wipes

    Clothing:
    Polarized Sunglasses
    OR sun hat
    OR fleece balaclava
    Montbell synthetic sweater.
    Fingerless gloves
    Marmot precip rain jacket with hood
    Marmot precip rain pants
    Fishing shirt
    2 pair underwear
    2 pair wool hiking socks
    Vasque trail shoes.
    Synthetic Long john top and bottoms
    TNF Hiking pants

    Fishing gear
    5 weight rod with rod case
    Reel
    2 fly boxes
    5 leaders
    2 spools of tippet
    Nippers
    Hemostat
    Sink gel
    Floatant gel
    strike indicators
    Mojo mud
    WJ ultralight fishing pack
    Travel waders
    Wading shoes

    Black Diamond "firstlight" tent
    Jetboil stove with 2 fuel canisters
    katadin water purifier
    katadin water purifier tablets
    platypus 2 gallon water container
    camp suds
     
  2. jett

    jett Senior member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2007
    Kai, any idea what that total weight is? Also, do you normally carry 2 gallons of water with you in addition to the 3-liter bag? That seems like a lot to me but I'm not familar with that terrain so perhaps it's a bit dry there?

    What do you think of the Marmot bag? I've read lots of good things about their bags.
     
  3. remn

    remn Senior member

    Messages:
    283
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Know I'm bringing up an old thread, but I'm going on a backpacking/climbing trip in a month and need I pack recommendation. Seems like the consensus is to go to a B&M store and try it on, so I'll do that for sure. In the interim, any recommendations would be helpful.

    I am 5'9" and wear a 36R Jacket. The trip is going to be around 3 days, so I'll need a frame pack that's fairly lightweight, but roomy enough for the essentials (food, sleeping bag, rope, etc). Thanks.
     
  4. Ludeykrus

    Ludeykrus Senior member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    May 27, 2007
    Location:
    North Georgia
    Eh, I use my old aluminum external frame pack from Scouts that I picked up used for ~$10, and it always worked fine.

    However, I will hopefully be doing some longer hikes in the future and my old Army-issue surplus 0-degree sleeping bag is entirely too heavy. Any recommendations on a durable, cheap 0-degree sleeping bag that's fairly lightweight?
     
  5. Brad

    Brad Senior member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Beyond Thunderdome
    Know I'm bringing up an old thread, but I'm going on a backpacking/climbing trip in a month and need I pack recommendation. Seems like the consensus is to go to a B&M store and try it on, so I'll do that for sure. In the interim, any recommendations would be helpful.

    I am 5'9" and wear a 36R Jacket. The trip is going to be around 3 days, so I'll need a frame pack that's fairly lightweight, but roomy enough for the essentials (food, sleeping bag, rope, etc). Thanks.


    By all means, you need to be fitted for a pack by someone that's experienced with fitting. But, if your local shop carries Arc Teryx, it fits you, and you can afford it, buy it. In my experience, no one makes better soft gear than Arc Teryx and Patagonia. Unfortunately, Patagonia doesn't make packs. Arc Teryx packs are minimalist, but bomber. You will not regret spending the money on a pack that fits you well and is comfortable. If you're in the market for boots*, I suggest you get them as soon as possible and wear the shit out of them in the month leading up to your trip. Throw out the stock foot beds and replace them with a set of Superfeet. You'll thank me later.

    *You can't go wrong with La Sportiva or Scarpa.
     
  6. Caomhanach

    Caomhanach Senior member

    Messages:
    487
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    I am forum moderator for a emergency preparedness website. I will wait for moderator approval to post a link ( it is non profit.) I've found more mindsets entering the wilderness than varieties of backpack. A ultralight proponent is a completely different animal than a survivalist in cammies, buckskinner or horsepacker. My observations and experience show most people carry to much kit. Sometimes nothing but experience will winnow out the kitchen sinks. The flip side is people insist on putting wieght as first priority on the strangest things. A sleeping bag, which I personally consider the # 1 piece of survival gear above all else is to keep you warm. The law of physics cannot be overturned. We need X amount of loft to maintaint X heat ( with variations of body mass, metabolism and other mechanisms used to keep warm.) Most of the rated claims are IN TENTS and using laboratory measures about as real as new car gas mileage. You cannot have a sleeping bag that wieghs 2 oz and rolls up into a grapefruit and expect to be warm in a suprise blizzard. A combative and controversial ( but hard to debate) member of the industry is Jerry Wigetow of www.wiggies.com Read his lengthy materials on insulation. You may go out with a pair of wool army blankets or a goose down mummy bag.Your the guy who crawls into it at night, nobody else. But read Jerry.
     
  7. remn

    remn Senior member

    Messages:
    283
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    By all means, you need to be fitted for a pack by someone that's experienced with fitting. But, if your local shop carries Arc Teryx, it fits you, and you can afford it, buy it. In my experience, no one makes better soft gear than Arc Teryx and Patagonia. Unfortunately, Patagonia doesn't make packs. Arc Teryx packs are minimalist, but bomber. You will not regret spending the money on a pack that fits you well and is comfortable. If you're in the market for boots*, I suggest you get them as soon as possible and wear the shit out of them in the month leading up to your trip. Throw out the stock foot beds and replace them with a set of Superfeet. You'll thank me later.

    *You can't go wrong with La Sportiva or Scarpa.

    Got fitted for packs today. Arc Teryx was out of my price point so I ended up walking away with a Gregory Z55 after trying on a lot of packs and walking around for quite a while (the outfitters place had a rock ramp and other stuff which was helpful). With regard to shoes, can I just wear a pair of comfortable sneakers or running shoes?
     
  8. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago
    With regard to shoes, can I just wear a pair of comfortable sneakers or running shoes?

    If your an experienced backpacker with well conditioned ankles you could possibly get by in comfortable sneakers/shoes. However, if you not use to carrying a load and your hiking across rocky/unstable terrain you probably going to want the ankle support a boot offers you.
     
  9. Caomhanach

    Caomhanach Senior member

    Messages:
    487
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Get a good boot, and more importantly good socks and wicking liners. And break the boots well in before you go. Moleskin is perhaps the most counterproducctive stuff around. It actually increases bacterial growth in a blister when used as a cheap and dirty placebo for every foot ouchie.
     
  10. Milhouse

    Milhouse Senior member

    Messages:
    2,059
    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Get a good boot, and more importantly good socks and wicking liners. And break the boots well in before you go. Moleskin is perhaps the most counterproducctive stuff around. It actually increases bacterial growth in a blister when used as a cheap and dirty placebo for every foot ouchie.

    Do you have citations for your claim about moleskin? If so, please list them, I'd like to read them.

    Thank you.
     
  11. Brad

    Brad Senior member

    Messages:
    2,297
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Beyond Thunderdome
    Got fitted for packs today. Arc Teryx was out of my price point so I ended up walking away with a Gregory Z55 after trying on a lot of packs and walking around for quite a while (the outfitters place had a rock ramp and other stuff which was helpful). With regard to shoes, can I just wear a pair of comfortable sneakers or running shoes?

    Gregory makes excellent stuff. As another poster noted, I wouldn't wear tennis shoes or sneakers if you're actually going to be on any terrain that is questionable - even if you're used to carrying a heavy pack. If you're not used to carrying a heavy pack, don't wear sneakers on any terrain. This doesn't mean you have to get a pair of Norwegian welted, six pound boots. There are plenty of options in the lightweight, supportive boot category. Look into La Sportiva, Scarpa, or maybe most appropriately for your needs, Kayland.
     
  12. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,577
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2006
    I am forum moderator for a emergency preparedness website. I will wait for moderator approval to post a link ( it is non profit.) I've found more mindsets entering the wilderness than varieties of backpack. A ultralight proponent is a completely different animal than a survivalist in cammies, buckskinner or horsepacker. My observations and experience show most people carry to much kit. Sometimes nothing but experience will winnow out the kitchen sinks. The flip side is people insist on putting wieght as first priority on the strangest things. A sleeping bag, which I personally consider the # 1 piece of survival gear above all else is to keep you warm. The law of physics cannot be overturned. We need X amount of loft to maintaint X heat ( with variations of body mass, metabolism and other mechanisms used to keep warm.) Most of the rated claims are IN TENTS and using laboratory measures about as real as new car gas mileage. You cannot have a sleeping bag that wieghs 2 oz and rolls up into a grapefruit and expect to be warm in a suprise blizzard. A combative and controversial ( but hard to debate) member of the industry is Jerry Wigetow of www.wiggies.com Read his lengthy materials on insulation. You may go out with a pair of wool army blankets or a goose down mummy bag.Your the guy who crawls into it at night, nobody else. But read Jerry.

    it's wiggys.com. And he is a nut (in the good sense).
     
  13. Caomhanach

    Caomhanach Senior member

    Messages:
    487
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Thanks for the correction D. Milhouse, I don't have direct resources, just several anecdotal observations and opinions from EMT types and outdoor people. Moleskin is NOT a bad product. It has it's place. But like anything consumers expect magic bullets and shoot themselves in the foot- with moleskin literaly. You put it on a soft spot, it sticks and cuts off air. Bacteria goes to town unless you remove it and clean. My friends have cleaned up to many infections from Moleskin slapped on and the problem forgotten until later.Bandaid solutions, with anything never do as well as permanent ones. with feet that may be better hygiene, socks even a boot last or simply an insert or lacing differently. Oh, as an aside. A great read is THE 2 OZ. BACKPACKER by Robert S. Wood TEN SPEED PRESS- they ahve other backpacking titles wsorth a read.
     
  14. Milhouse

    Milhouse Senior member

    Messages:
    2,059
    Joined:
    May 11, 2007
    Thank you for your honesty. I happen to be both an EMT type and an outdoors type. Moleskin, when used properly, is a good product, in my opinion. It is a tool that I include in my toolbox.
     
  15. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

    Messages:
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    May 14, 2007
    Location:
    In the woods
    RESURRECTION

    Hey boys. Last week I went on a day hike with a buddy for the first time. Needless to say I had an awesome time and would like to continue hiking and eventually do some overnight trips. So, of course now I'm going to need to buy some gear. Is there any particular order that you experienced hikers would recommend buying gear? Are all these water purifiers, walking sticks, and other high tech stuff really necessary?

    All I have right now is a jansport backback that I used through highschool, and a pair of hi-tec trail shoes.


    Thanks in advance
    john
     
  16. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

    Messages:
    33,650
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    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    My father has been backpacking avidly for about 35 years. Whenever it's around Christmastime and he knows we're going to get him some gear, he always reminds us that the most important thing is that everything is as light as absolutely possible. That might or might not apply to overnight trips versus weeklong trips, but that's all I've got.
     
  17. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,577
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2006
    RESURRECTION Hey boys. Last week I went on a day hike with a buddy for the first time. Needless to say I had an awesome time and would like to continue hiking and eventually do some overnight trips. So, of course now I'm going to need to buy some gear. Is there any particular order that you experienced hikers would recommend buying gear? Are all these water purifiers, walking sticks, and other high tech stuff really necessary? All I have right now is a jansport backback that I used through highschool, and a pair of hi-tec trail shoes. Thanks in advance john
    Buy Colin Fletcher's The Complete Walker. It is an old school, hard core hiker/backpacker style book, but it is well written and will give you lots of insight into how backpacking "works" You are unlikely to adopt his style, but understanding it will help you make very good choices. It is in its fourth edition, which should tell you how useful it is. In order, boots, backpack, tent, stove, sleeping bag. That doesn't mean get new - if your boots and backpack are comfortable, keep them. Plus - get a rain shell. Nothing is worse than being wet for long periods. I always liked using an MSR water pump/filter for drinking water and boiling for cooking. For stove, I had always liked kerosene /multifuel stoves like MSRs expedition stoves, but became a late convert to lightweight canister gas stoves.
     
  18. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,309
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago
    RESURRECTION

    Hey boys. Last week I went on a day hike with a buddy for the first time. Needless to say I had an awesome time and would like to continue hiking and eventually do some overnight trips. So, of course now I'm going to need to buy some gear. Is there any particular order that you experienced hikers would recommend buying gear? Are all these water purifiers, walking sticks, and other high tech stuff really necessary?

    All I have right now is a jansport backback that I used through highschool, and a pair of hi-tec trail shoes.


    Thanks in advance
    john


    Here is a pretty good list: http://www.tripleblaze.com/blog/outd...ing-checklist/
    You could probably eliminate number 6: Chair and be ok. I'd also add a first kit.
    Cooking gear is flexible too (don't need a cooler or charcoal). You don't even really need a stove if you can confidently build a camping fire, but it is nice and you don't have to worry about finding dry wood if it rains.

    You are probably going to want a better back pack for over night trips.

    You'll want some clothing you can layer, typically not cotton, which definitely includes something to keep you warm (fleece) and dry (poncho/rain gear).

    Don't get a down sleepin bag, get a synthetic one.

    Get an LED flashlight, and in particular don't get a non-LED maglight. Headlamps can be nice, but I would carry an extra light too.
     
  19. constant struggle

    constant struggle Senior member

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    all hikers look the same these days, those fruity shorts, ugly boots, etc...
    even when they are doing just an overnight trip, why not just wear some jeans, etc
     
  20. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Senior member

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    all hikers look the same these days, those fruity shorts, ugly boots, etc...
    even when they are doing just an overnight trip, why not just wear some jeans, etc


    http://outside.away.com/outside/gear.../20030327.html

     

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