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Hidden inseam

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by why, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. ringring

    ringring Senior member

    Messages:
    115
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    I really don't think this is true. I hear all the time about how felled seams are the strongest type of seam, with the reasoning mostly being, "well, just look at all that fabric tied up in there!" But I've never seen any empirical evidence that they're stronger than a lapped seam, and the argument does exist among top textile manufacturers.

    What I do know is this: most of the jeans espoused to be of highest quality around here have lapped inseams. None of my high quality camping gear (tents, bags) use felled seams, and I've also heard that they're avoided on sails and parachutes.


    I'm sure if you took the time, you could conduct your own experiment to see the strength differences between a lapped and felled seam. If not, then employing the services of an independent testing agency such as http://www.sgs.com would settle it [​IMG]

    I'm sure it would only take a few clicks on google to find ample evidence that fell seams have been used for both sails and parachutes. There's evidence that fell seams were used as long ago as the Viking era for sails.

    http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Parachute.html

    The last thing I know is that felled seams are cheap to produce and are friggin' ugly as hell

    That's just personal taste. Personally, I beg to differ.

    For what it's worth, I have seen failed flat-felled seams. They occur on the felled outseam of jeans that were probably purchased at Wal-Mart. This may have to do with the quality of things purchased at Wal-Mart, but the chances of seeing a failed lapped seam are much slimmer because cheap jeans don't use lapped seams.

    I think that's a classic case of Confirmation Bias (the tendency to interpret limited information to re-enforce one's prejudices). Unless you have seen felled seams consistently fail where other seams have held, then seeing a pair or two of Wall-Mart jeans fall apart is nothing.
     
  2. ringring

    ringring Senior member

    Messages:
    115
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Also, for what it's worth, I have had a pair of jeans with a lapped yolk. They were a pair of Agave, and, honestly, I've only owned a couple pairs of jeans since that I felt were constructed better (RRL being one). I'm not trying to start an argument. You know a helluva lot about jeans (and it's good to see you posting again). I just don't really like why very much.
    Lapped seams and open seams are regularly used in the yoke of womens jeans too - they sit flatter than fell seams, so are perceived to provide a neater fit. Not stronger. I'm not trying to argue either and respect your aesthetic choice regarding fell seams. Thank you also for the welcome back.
     
  3. whacked

    whacked Senior member

    Messages:
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    Sep 24, 2006
    I, whacked, approve of this thread.


    Both ken and ringring should post moar.
     
  4. deadstock

    deadstock Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    May 3, 2006
    ^ agreed and seconded. Great to see you posting again ringring. Welcome back!
     
  5. ken

    ken Senior member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Chicago
    I'm sure if you took the time, you could conduct your own experiment to see the strength differences between a lapped and felled seam.

    I'm way ahead of you. But they'll have to be straight stitched, because I don't have a chain stitch machine.

    They say they use a French fell seam, but the picture they show looks like a flat-fell seam. I know the construction of the two are different... not sure about the strength.
     
  6. ringring

    ringring Senior member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    I'm way ahead of you. But they'll have to be straight stitched, because I don't have a chain stitch machine.


    They say they use a French fell seam, but the picture they show looks like a flat-fell seam. I know the construction of the two are different... not sure about the strength.


    The seam they have pictured is a fell seam, they call it French Fell (as opposed to a french seam, commonly used as a clean finish for fine fabrics, such as silk blouses) and I've also known it as run-and-fell.

    Have a look at this link regarding Ancient Egyptian materials - there's a good illustration of a run-and-fell.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=Vj7...um=6&ct=result
     
  7. sho'nuff

    sho'nuff Senior member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Irvine
    [​IMG]
    A spoonful of sugar...


    Julie Andrews was hot
     
  8. MortyGras

    MortyGras Senior member

    Messages:
    639
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Finaly!
    We can now definitly defend the extra money we spend on selvedge denim!

    *Dance*

    and

    *Dance*

    and

    *Twist*

    now

    *Boogieee*
     

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