Hey SF. New Brooks Brothers Employee here. Any advice?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Yorsch, May 1, 2012.

  1. freddych

    freddych Senior member

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    Suggest customers size down one, chances are they've never even tried it. New York Streets would be so much more pleasant on the eyes if 80% of the people walking around sized down their suits by one or two size even.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2012
  2. chimchiminey

    chimchiminey Active Member

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    As has been said, knowledge of the product line is key.
     
  3. Viral

    Viral Senior member

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    the real key is to provide hook-ups to SF members...........LOL.

    Seriously, there is no one answer. As you start working and as you learn about your customer base it will all come together on it's own. Don't over-think the simple stuff and don't force a customer to something they don't want.

    So, when can I start calling you to stack my corporate discount with Friends & Family????
     
  4. SirGrotius

    SirGrotius Senior member

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    I've had a BB associate insist a size 38 suit was good for me, when I usually wear a 36 (they did not have any in stock). I'd keep your eye on the slimmer lines. Make sure your store carries the extra-slim cut, because not all do. Try to carry some MIA stuff, as guys like me won't buy anything else when there.

    Does your store carry Black Fleece. I'm a fan.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2012
  5. Yorsch

    Yorsch Well-Known Member

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    Got it. Be knowledgeable, fair and honest. Thank you for all the advices.

    From what I understood, in regards to BB, it seems like there is an issue with big selection of fits (About 6 I believe: 5 + BF), which is confusing for customer and SA sometimes fails to know/educate the difference between them. I will definitely look into studying them better. Is there anything else about the suits?

    How about shirts? Fits? How do you feel about non-iron shirts?
     
  6. Wrenkin

    Wrenkin Senior member

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    Non-Iron generally sucks, and is terrible for a place like Toronto in the summer. It's like wearing a plastic bag. I have not tried the BB ones, but all the others I have are terrible, so I've never had much reason to experiment. One thing I do hate is going to BB and seeing only Non-Iron shirts, and having to poke around for the regular ones.

    As for the fits, I do like BB extra slim fit, but it's been my experience that the sleeves were much longer than normal on the sport shirts compared to the slim fits. That was back when BB introduced them, maybe it's changed. The issue with Brooks' shirts, like with suits & pants, is the number of fits available at retail. And like with the Non-Irons, inevitably some things are crowded out. It's great that you always have recourse to the website, but it makes in-person shopping frustrating (which is already frustrating enough given Canadian markup. At least it's better than the markup on Regent St., or the wonderful surprise you get when your web order arrives with several Made-in-America items and one Bangladeshi item, resulting in the whole order getting dinged for duty, contra NAFTA).
     
  7. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    Eton and Dunhill are excellent non-iron shirts, for Toronto in the summer.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2012
  8. Stirling

    Stirling Senior member

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    I agree totally.
     
  9. bbhues

    bbhues Well-Known Member

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    My biggest turn-off is the SA's with attitude who act visibly annoyed to be wasting their time helping you. Another is SA's who do not know their product and/or try to shove you into a jacket that does not fit right just because they do not have your real size in stock.

    Agree 100%. I know I am (somewhat) in between a 38R and 38S, but I dislike it when SA's try to shove me into a 38R instead of the 38S I request because of their own style preferences or because of size availability. Another partially-linked comment: it may be helpful to gauge how educated each customer is - have they done a lot of research and know what they are looking for (i.e., do they know the different fits and fabrics), or are they expecting you to guide them through their purchase (i.e. they just know what type of product they want to purchase)?

    W/r/t dressing up or down, I don't know as well as other SFers how it changes how you are treated. But if I am buying a suit, I like to see how it looks with my own accoutrements. But I would hope it doesn't matter whether you are wearing Raf Simmons or Hanes.
     
  10. styless

    styless Well-Known Member

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    From my recent experience at BB.
    Suits: Recognize your customer's needs. Some people know exactly what they want and know what to look for. Others need guidance. At one store they tried to shove one jacket that I knew did not fit right. At another, the SA let me try a few different jackets and pointed out which worked best. She even suggested going to Madison Ave store for MTM option.

    Shoes: I wanted to get some Peal & Co shoes and I wanted to know if they were AS or C&J. I was told all BB shoes were made by Alden. Having lurked at SF for a while, I asked even the Made in England ones? Response: Yes.
    I left very confused.
     
  11. cropknox

    cropknox Active Member

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    +1 many a high end mens retailer has tuned me off and lost sales from me this way . . .
     
  12. Texasmade

    Texasmade Senior member

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    I was looking for some dress pants once and the SA at the BB I usually go to pointed me to where they were. He then picked out a pair and said "this color has been really hot this season" or something to that effect like I was some fashion hipster even though I was dressed up in a blazer, slacks, French cuffed shirt, etc.

    Ever since then I refuse to go to him because I just can't take him seriously anymore.
     
  13. CYstyle

    CYstyle Senior member

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    Honestly if you want to make money, forget a lot of what you learned on SF. You get paid on commission means you gotta sell. You can insist on putting a customer in the right size, they'll think your just a dumb kid who likes tight fitting fashion clothes. Too many people like their clothes a size up because "it's comfortable" or that's the size they've always worn. Better to just nod, and then go get some ties/shirts or other things to add on to the sale rather than argue.your bread and butter is gonna be the non-iron shirts, buy 3/whatever price then throw some slacks or ties on to the deal. The majority of SA's know jack about fit/construction/fabric, but they do alright because they can sell.
     
  14. LeJouvre

    LeJouvre Senior member

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    The most famous and successful fashion retailer in England coined the phrase "the customer is always right" - this is a philosophy you may learn well to apply.

    Rule 1 - always listen carefully to a customer and always presume the customer knows best

    Rule 2- always repeat back to the customer any request the customer has made to make absolutely certain you understood the customer's request

    Rule 3 - only make your own suggestions / recommendations when the customer specifically asks or when it become obvious the customer has screwed up
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2012
  15. Blackhood

    Blackhood Senior member

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    The customer is not always right, but he must never be allowed to know.

    Being a good retailer is like being a good servant; the customer should always leave wondering how difficult life would have been without your help.
     

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