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JohnAAG

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@am55 I always enjoy learning more about the ways certain elements of style were incorporated in different countries. The practical and functional aspects of outdoor style are certainly part of its appeal. And I was also a big Vuarnet fan back in the day!

The brands one wore said a lot about your "tribe". In Canada at that time, there was a strong U.S. influence. So Patagonia, North Face, Royal Robbins, Woolrich and brands like that all had a place in our closets (Pataonia catalogs were our bibles back then). But we also had distinctly Canadian brands (for that time). For example, Arc'Teryx hardware (climbing harnesses and backpacks) were very revolutionary in the early 90s and everyone wanted them. Around the mid-90s they were one of the first manufacturers to use 3ply Gore-Tex fabric in their outerwear and, combined with more minimalist designs, it was a real game changer. I remember being in Joshua Tree in 1998 with my Arc'Teryx gear and all the U.S. climbers asking me about it. European labels were also important, especially in footwear and hardware. La Sportiva, Raichle and Garmont were popular. And we also mixed in some distinctly Canadian workwear and artisanal brands.

I think if there's one element of "outdoor style" that's at the root of it's cross-over into other style genres it's the technical fabrics and the way other designers started to use them. For example, @xeoniq often discusses fabrics that I'm quite familiar with. But I don't think anyone would think he's dressed to go out on a 6 day hike in the woods. He's selected technical pieces that are much more refined and minimalist in their style with more of a CM influence, but they still offer a high level of performance. Personally, I think that's a great example of creativity on the part of the designers when it comes to re-interpreting what a specific style genre has to offer.

@Clouseau and @cocostella I'd never heard the term Hikerdelic before so I did a quick search for it. That brought back some memories! The retro style anoraks with the big colorblock designs, the rugby shirts, etc. For me, it definitely has that late 1970s to early 90s dirtbag outdoor style vibe. When I recently visited the outdoor shops in the U.S. (REI, LL Bean) for the first time in about 20 years, I was a little shocked to see how those old school styles were making a comeback. It was almost like nothing had changed in the two decades I was away.

Personally, I am now finding myself drawn to brands that are blending together heritage styling with technical performance. Grenfell, Private White, Fjallraven, some pieces from Barbour. I think some of Patagonia's archive inspired pieces are also interesting. And here on SF, I'm enjoying many of the pieces SEH Kelly is producing (lots of thought put into their designs).

Cheers!
 

Clouseau

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@am55 I always enjoy learning more about the ways certain elements of style were incorporated in different countries. The practical and functional aspects of outdoor style are certainly part of its appeal. And I was also a big Vuarnet fan back in the day!

The brands one wore said a lot about your "tribe". In Canada at that time, there was a strong U.S. influence. So Patagonia, North Face, Royal Robbins, Woolrich and brands like that all had a place in our closets (Pataonia catalogs were our bibles back then). But we also had distinctly Canadian brands (for that time). For example, Arc'Teryx hardware (climbing harnesses and backpacks) were very revolutionary in the early 90s and everyone wanted them. Around the mid-90s they were one of the first manufacturers to use 3ply Gore-Tex fabric in their outerwear and, combined with more minimalist designs, it was a real game changer. I remember being in Joshua Tree in 1998 with my Arc'Teryx gear and all the U.S. climbers asking me about it. European labels were also important, especially in footwear and hardware. La Sportiva, Raichle and Garmont were popular. And we also mixed in some distinctly Canadian workwear and artisanal brands.

I think if there's one element of "outdoor style" that's at the root of it's cross-over into other style genres it's the technical fabrics and the way other designers started to use them. For example, @xeoniq often discusses fabrics that I'm quite familiar with. But I don't think anyone would think he's dressed to go out on a 6 day hike in the woods. He's selected technical pieces that are much more refined and minimalist in their style with more of a CM influence, but they still offer a high level of performance. Personally, I think that's a great example of creativity on the part of the designers when it comes to re-interpreting what a specific style genre has to offer.

@Clouseau and @cocostella I'd never heard the term Hikerdelic before so I did a quick search for it. That brought back some memories! The retro style anoraks with the big colorblock designs, the rugby shirts, etc. For me, it definitely has that late 1970s to early 90s dirtbag outdoor style vibe. When I recently visited the outdoor shops in the U.S. (REI, LL Bean) for the first time in about 20 years, I was a little shocked to see how those old school styles were making a comeback. It was almost like nothing had changed in the two decades I was away.

Personally, I am now finding myself drawn to brands that are blending together heritage styling with technical performance. Grenfell, Private White, Fjallraven, some pieces from Barbour. I think some of Patagonia's archive inspired pieces are also interesting. And here on SF, I'm enjoying many of the pieces SEH Kelly is producing (lots of thought put into their designs).

Cheers!
Bringing back some memories... here in the mid-late 90s Millet Gore-Tex were all the rage !

Millet.jpeg
 

am55

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I will say one thing that has made a big difference in hiking is the Uniqlo stuff (and similar brands, but for me mostly Uniqlo). Now in just about any country in the world, including in Chengdu a few years back, if I forgot something I can just pop in the nearest Uniqlo and get lightweight, cheap clothing that is neutral enough to fit in with just about anything. Additionally they are technically very impressive - my puffy (taken to the mountain and British winter last year) is as warm as if not warmer than my ski jacket, although not as wind proof. But the super light sleeveless down that rolls into a tiny, ultra light ball is the one item that makes it every trip. Accordingly I try and pop in every so often and see what new stuff they've come up with.

Honorary mention to Decathlon which went from awful but extremely cheap stuff for growing French kids, to a quality which I think is on par with some impressive brands. I've been hiking in a pair of $20 (down from $40) trainers with a hard grippy sole from there that have held up to potholed firetrails, thunderstorms, mud, red dust, the works and with a rinse are like new. As a bonus my wife assures me that they look fine for town, which is the first time in I don't know how many dozen pairs of outdoorsy shoes I've owned; and somehow they are less constraining than the trail shoes I habitually pack just in case so I can wear them on back to back long haul flights.

Only sad thing is that I promised myself a pair of Galibiers some day and now it's highly unlikely to happen.
 

Clouseau

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I will say one thing that has made a big difference in hiking is the Uniqlo stuff (and similar brands, but for me mostly Uniqlo). Now in just about any country in the world, including in Chengdu a few years back, if I forgot something I can just pop in the nearest Uniqlo and get lightweight, cheap clothing that is neutral enough to fit in with just about anything. Additionally they are technically very impressive - my puffy (taken to the mountain and British winter last year) is as warm as if not warmer than my ski jacket, although not as wind proof. But the super light sleeveless down that rolls into a tiny, ultra light ball is the one item that makes it every trip. Accordingly I try and pop in every so often and see what new stuff they've come up with.

Honorary mention to Decathlon which went from awful but extremely cheap stuff for growing French kids, to a quality which I think is on par with some impressive brands. I've been hiking in a pair of $20 (down from $40) trainers with a hard grippy sole from there that have held up to potholed firetrails, thunderstorms, mud, red dust, the works and with a rinse are like new. As a bonus my wife assures me that they look fine for town, which is the first time in I don't know how many dozen pairs of outdoorsy shoes I've owned; and somehow they are less constraining than the trail shoes I habitually pack just in case so I can wear them on back to back long haul flights.

Only sad thing is that I promised myself a pair of Galibiers some day and now it's highly unlikely to happen.
+ 1 for Décathlon. Mainly use them for my kids, but i am also impressed by the quality and the sturdiness of their stuff...
 

Kingstonian

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+ 1 for Décathlon. Mainly use them for my kids, but i am also impressed by the quality and the sturdiness of their stuff...
Decathlon are said to be good for bicycles too, but their bikes that are well rated are out of stock due to demand during lockdown.
 

Kingstonian

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I will say one thing that has made a big difference in hiking is the Uniqlo stuff (and similar brands, but for me mostly Uniqlo). Now in just about any country in the world, including in Chengdu a few years back, if I forgot something I can just pop in the nearest Uniqlo and get lightweight, cheap clothing that is neutral enough to fit in with just about anything. Additionally they are technically very impressive - my puffy (taken to the mountain and British winter last year) is as warm as if not warmer than my ski jacket, although not as wind proof. But the super light sleeveless down that rolls into a tiny, ultra light ball is the one item that makes it every trip. Accordingly I try and pop in every so often and see what new stuff they've come up with.

Honorary mention to Decathlon which went from awful but extremely cheap stuff for growing French kids, to a quality which I think is on par with some impressive brands. I've been hiking in a pair of $20 (down from $40) trainers with a hard grippy sole from there that have held up to potholed firetrails, thunderstorms, mud, red dust, the works and with a rinse are like new. As a bonus my wife assures me that they look fine for town, which is the first time in I don't know how many dozen pairs of outdoorsy shoes I've owned; and somehow they are less constraining than the trail shoes I habitually pack just in case so I can wear them on back to back long haul flights.

Only sad thing is that I promised myself a pair of Galibiers some day and now it's highly unlikely to happen.
I assume you mean the thin down gilets and jackets that come with a little bag to pack them. Uniqlo were good for fleeces a few years back. Socks are decent too. There can be issues with size on shirts, they tend to be at the skimpy end. Uniqlo merino knitwear is very good at the moment.
 

Clouseau

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Decathlon are said to be good for bicycles too, but their bikes that are well rated are out of stock due to demand during lockdown.
Yes i confirm. My son has a bike from their "B-TWIN" series, really good and a very reasonable price.
 

am55

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Yes i confirm. My son has a bike from their "B-TWIN" series, really good and a very reasonable price.
I think in many countries Decathlon still offers the cheapest new bike shaped object that will hold together a few years. Also they'll fix it for you usually for free, at least in Singapore.

But they can't work miracles - the ball bearings, the wheels, etc. all take a hit after just a few months of regular usage (this is true of any budget bike). It's still worth spending a bit more for a Merida or LaPierre or whatever that will last for years with little maintenance and perform much better. You can also build something off old but high quality frames found on eBay, with the added advantage that (IMO) a custom lightweight steel frame (think Reynolds, for the Brits) looks (and feels) much better than the massive, fat aluminium frames sold everywhere.
 

am55

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I assume you mean the thin down gilets and jackets that come with a little bag to pack them. Uniqlo were good for fleeces a few years back. Socks are decent too. There can be issues with size on shirts, they tend to be at the skimpy end. Uniqlo merino knitwear is very good at the moment.
Yes, but also anything with down in it is worth taking a look at. My down jacket is one of the collaboration limited editions things and comes with a few more things over the standard down parka or whatever they call it which really are very helpful (detachable hood, separate stitched-on-top pockets being the two I can think of). I have a dilemma with these things because I never could buy into the blown-up-binbag look that these puffies have which is so popular with streetwear types, but the warmth-to-weight ratio is undeniable and it is very hard to justify anything else if you're travelling with anemic weight allowances and km-long corridors at destination airports (thinking of you Heathrow). An overcoat is what, 5-10kg? That's basically your carry on. So I have to take a leaf from the rappers books and go puffy.

The best part is that even the large down jackets I'm talking about roll up in one of the external pockets of a typical Samsonite or whatever roll on. So you can take a risk, stick it in the pocket, and not have to carry a coat with you on board. The risk being that the arrival belt area is not heated. I've been "had" twice at LHR and TLS respectively watching the empty, not moving belt for 40 minutes in close to freezing weather in just a jumper. Now I carry it on :D
 

Kingstonian

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I think in many countries Decathlon still offers the cheapest new bike shaped object that will hold together a few years. Also they'll fix it for you usually for free, at least in Singapore.

But they can't work miracles - the ball bearings, the wheels, etc. all take a hit after just a few months of regular usage (this is true of any budget bike). It's still worth spending a bit more for a Merida or LaPierre or whatever that will last for years with little maintenance and perform much better. You can also build something off old but high quality frames found on eBay, with the added advantage that (IMO) a custom lightweight steel frame (think Reynolds, for the Brits) looks (and feels) much better than the massive, fat aluminium frames sold everywhere.
Well the various bike review forums think otherwise.

Having grown up with inexpensive secondhand bicycles that even had the gears removed to save money, there is no reason at all why a basic bicycle should fail after a couple of months - and that was certainly not my experience.
 

JohnAAG

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Well the various bike review forums think otherwise.

Having grown up with inexpensive secondhand bicycles that even had the gears removed to save money, there is no reason at all why a basic bicycle should fail after a couple of months - and that was certainly not my experience.
Has there been a more appropriate time to use "Your Mileage May Vary"?
:D
 

am55

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Well the various bike review forums think otherwise.

Having grown up with inexpensive secondhand bicycles that even had the gears removed to save money, there is no reason at all why a basic bicycle should fail after a couple of months - and that was certainly not my experience.
I think there will be at least the brakes (wearing out) and tyres (more prone to puncture) if using regularly on city roads. Both a cheap upgrade. Then with Decathlon specifically, rust has been a problem on the mid range as well as failing of the ball bearings within the pedals (a surprisingly annoying failure). And generally speaking a cheap bike will be heavy, and use cheaper bearings which you "feel" as resistance on the road. I agree that YMMV - as a student I bought an old rusty mountain bike for 20 quid which with a cable replacement and some tuning remained my daily driver for years until someone stole it.
 

Luigi_M

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I was looking for black brogues
If you still are, Grenson 'Albert' have been further discounted and now sell for £ 150 + £15 p&p + the VAT your Country applies. A nice reduction from the original price of £ 450. I just placed my order.
 

Clouseau

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If you still are, Grenson 'Albert' have been further discounted and now sell for £ 150 + £15 p&p + the VAT your Country applies. A nice reduction from the original price of £ 450. I just placed my order.
Cheers Luigi, but i want derbies with Dainite soles...
 

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