• Hi, I'm the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear and fashion.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

HERE AND NOW

smittycl

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
7,587
Reaction score
10,305
Just had a look. Interesting thing is that like Stowa they propose their watch with or without logo/brand name. Looks much better without IMO.
I bought the watch without the logo for the same reason. Looks much cleaner.
 

am55

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2014
Messages
3,398
Reaction score
2,578
Wore my puffy jkt in its natural environment yesterday ...
View attachment 1542571
Mtn Hardwear jkt
Old Ibex pullover
Uniqlo fleece lined pants
My trusty Vasque Sundowners (the old made in Italy models with the Skywalk sole, going on 20 yrs now)
Awesome Vasques! Do they remain dry even after say, 30 minutes in deep snow? This was the issue I had with leather walking boots that had me return to synthetics and particularly a plastic shell if in snow for extended time.

This got me to think: to what extent do you make concessions to style whilst out and "active"? Especially if going somewhere with nobody around. Whilst @xeoniq has mastered activewear with a theme, for most of us the practical garments will detract from the impression.
 

JewishAmericana

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
155
Reaction score
296
Wall of text incoming, or I finished my course work early:


Hiker Punk, or My style
In terms of associated words, hiking and punk are not often talked about in relation to each other. In my opinion however punks and hikers have much in common in terms of values and attitudes. Good examples include a preference to live freely(albeit in different ways), often rebelling against society in one form or another, and a do it yourself attitude, among other things. In my opinion, hikers and punks are merely two streams of the same source of water.





In terms of a guiding philosophy to my style I’d say there isn’t one, but merely threads and scraps of other styles, eras, and movements woven together to create something unique to me, the person wearing it. The roots of this style run both deep and wide, with inspiration coming from things such as 1930’s-1960’s “Americana” to Punk movements of the late 60’s-90’s, to even my own experiences with punk shows and heroin. The common thread of all these things is of course, that they embody an ideal, such as 90’s grunge throwing away traditional ideas of masculinity, activists of the 50’s and 60’s fighting against unjust wars and racial oppression, and experiences such as doing local river clean ups. Attached to these movements and time periods are often various fashions and styles, that can be woven together in outfits or even in the pieces individually.



From Visvim to Enfants Riches Deprimes, pieces will often have a few features in common such as functionality, message, longevity, and quality. Some key statement pieces include diy tees, raw denim, heeled boots, hiking boots, and personalized clothing. I strive to let my clothes say something about me, and my values. In sum, my clothing is a reflection of me, my experiences, and what I value.
 

JohnAAG

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 19, 2016
Messages
1,786
Reaction score
11,928
@am55 The Vasques are great!

They have a Gore-tex liner which I usually avoid in leather boots. Leather boots need to be waterproofed anyway and once you add that treatment, it reduces the breathability even more. So the Gore-tex basically turns into a plastic bag inside the boot that traps the interior moisture. I'm willing to overlook the Gore-tex in the Sundowners only because they fit me almost perfectly out of the box and I like their simple design. I also have a pair of leather Danners (non-Gore-tex, just bathed in Snoseal) that I use for multi-day hiking with a heavier pack and my light mountaineering boots are leather Vasque Montanas. In other words, I'm happy using leather boots in wet conditions.

@am55 and @JewishAmericana: just sharing some thoughts on "outdoor style"

Growing up, my heroes were the original dirt bags. Guys like Chouinard, Royal Robbins, Chris Bonnington, Galen Rowell, the Burgess twins, etc. A great book for that old school dirt bag lifestyle is "Heroic Climbs" by Bonnington. Awesome inspiration!

And I agree there are some interesting points of intersection between the worldviews of the punk and the hardcore outdoor enthusiast. On the practical side, the DIY attitudes strongly overlap. For example, I'm not sure that many people know that Patagonia has it's roots in Chouinard teaching himself blacksmithing so he could make a better piton. In terms of attitude, I'm not sure the dirt bags were "rebelling" against anything in particular. It was more like they just wanted to live their lives on their own terms (although being environmentally conscience certainly became an important part of their worldview by the late 60s). But both sub-cultures were definitely rejecting what traditional society had to offer, even if they expressed that rejection in through different mediums.

Anyway, I find the whole "GORP-core" thing that's currently happening kind of funny, since that's just the way I dressed from my mid-teens until I was about 30 without giving it much thought. It was practical, it was comfortable, and it was the way my friends dressed. In other words, "outdoor style" was a part of our lifestyle, and our lifestyle was modeled on the people we admired. I'll admit it's great finding out that gear I wore day-to-day in the early 90s is now "cool" again. Especially since I still have a lot of it (and it still fits!). :-D

So, from my perspective, like CM and streetwear, "outdoor style" has it's own codes for looking "good" and it's own style heroes. Hell, for a while in the 2010s, I couldn't look at a coffee shop hipster without seeing a 1980s tele-skier! The beard, the patched wool sweater, the plaid flannel, the toque, mixed with some practical military pieces. All of it was part of a look I knew well from 30 years earlier.

But it's great seeing today's brands and designers find inspiration in that era and sub-culture and the twists they're putting on it. I'll admit I find some of it overly derivative. For example, I have a hard time seeing a difference between my 1989 Patagonia retropile and some more recent interpretations. On the other hand, things like the fit of the pieces and the way they're being combined with other style genres are really creative and interesting to see (for me at least).

Cheers!
 

JewishAmericana

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
155
Reaction score
296
@am55 The Vasques are great!

They have a Gore-tex liner which I usually avoid in leather boots. Leather boots need to be waterproofed anyway and once you add that treatment, it reduces the breathability even more. So the Gore-tex basically turns into a plastic bag inside the boot that traps the interior moisture. I'm willing to overlook the Gore-tex in the Sundowners only because they fit me almost perfectly out of the box and I like their simple design. I also have a pair of leather Danners (non-Gore-tex, just bathed in Snoseal) that I use for multi-day hiking with a heavier pack and my light mountaineering boots are leather Vasque Montanas. In other words, I'm happy using leather boots in wet conditions.

@am55 and @JewishAmericana: just sharing some thoughts on "outdoor style"

Growing up, my heroes were the original dirt bags. Guys like Chouinard, Royal Robbins, Chris Bonnington, Galen Rowell, the Burgess twins, etc. A great book for that old school dirt bag lifestyle is "Heroic Climbs" by Bonnington. Awesome inspiration!

And I agree there are some interesting points of intersection between the worldviews of the punk and the hardcore outdoor enthusiast. On the practical side, the DIY attitudes strongly overlap. For example, I'm not sure that many people know that Patagonia has it's roots in Chouinard teaching himself blacksmithing so he could make a better piton. In terms of attitude, I'm not sure the dirt bags were "rebelling" against anything in particular. It was more like they just wanted to live their lives on their own terms (although being environmentally conscience certainly became an important part of their worldview by the late 60s). But both sub-cultures were definitely rejecting what traditional society had to offer, even if they expressed that rejection in through different mediums.

Anyway, I find the whole "GORP-core" thing that's currently happening kind of funny, since that's just the way I dressed from my mid-teens until I was about 30 without giving it much thought. It was practical, it was comfortable, and it was the way my friends dressed. In other words, "outdoor style" was a part of our lifestyle, and our lifestyle was modeled on the people we admired. I'll admit it's great finding out that gear I wore day-to-day in the early 90s is now "cool" again. Especially since I still have a lot of it (and it still fits!). :-D

So, from my perspective, like CM and streetwear, "outdoor style" has it's own codes for looking "good" and it's own style heroes. Hell, for a while in the 2010s, I couldn't look at a coffee shop hipster without seeing a 1980s tele-skier! The beard, the patched wool sweater, the plaid flannel, the toque, mixed with some practical military pieces. All of it was part of a look I knew well from 30 years earlier.

But it's great seeing today's brands and designers find inspiration in that era and sub-culture and the twists they're putting on it. I'll admit I find some of it overly derivative. For example, I have a hard time seeing a difference between my 1989 Patagonia retropile and some more recent interpretations. On the other hand, things like the fit of the pieces and the way they're being combined with other style genres are really creative and interesting to see (for me at least).

Cheers!
Really, really enjoyed reading this thoughtful response!
 

am55

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2014
Messages
3,398
Reaction score
2,578
@am55 The Vasques are great!

They have a Gore-tex liner which I usually avoid in leather boots. Leather boots need to be waterproofed anyway and once you add that treatment, it reduces the breathability even more. So the Gore-tex basically turns into a plastic bag inside the boot that traps the interior moisture. I'm willing to overlook the Gore-tex in the Sundowners only because they fit me almost perfectly out of the box and I like their simple design. I also have a pair of leather Danners (non-Gore-tex, just bathed in Snoseal) that I use for multi-day hiking with a heavier pack and my light mountaineering boots are leather Vasque Montanas. In other words, I'm happy using leather boots in wet conditions.

@am55 and @JewishAmericana: just sharing some thoughts on "outdoor style"

Growing up, my heroes were the original dirt bags. Guys like Chouinard, Royal Robbins, Chris Bonnington, Galen Rowell, the Burgess twins, etc. A great book for that old school dirt bag lifestyle is "Heroic Climbs" by Bonnington. Awesome inspiration!

And I agree there are some interesting points of intersection between the worldviews of the punk and the hardcore outdoor enthusiast. On the practical side, the DIY attitudes strongly overlap. For example, I'm not sure that many people know that Patagonia has it's roots in Chouinard teaching himself blacksmithing so he could make a better piton. In terms of attitude, I'm not sure the dirt bags were "rebelling" against anything in particular. It was more like they just wanted to live their lives on their own terms (although being environmentally conscience certainly became an important part of their worldview by the late 60s). But both sub-cultures were definitely rejecting what traditional society had to offer, even if they expressed that rejection in through different mediums.

Anyway, I find the whole "GORP-core" thing that's currently happening kind of funny, since that's just the way I dressed from my mid-teens until I was about 30 without giving it much thought. It was practical, it was comfortable, and it was the way my friends dressed. In other words, "outdoor style" was a part of our lifestyle, and our lifestyle was modeled on the people we admired. I'll admit it's great finding out that gear I wore day-to-day in the early 90s is now "cool" again. Especially since I still have a lot of it (and it still fits!). :-D

So, from my perspective, like CM and streetwear, "outdoor style" has it's own codes for looking "good" and it's own style heroes. Hell, for a while in the 2010s, I couldn't look at a coffee shop hipster without seeing a 1980s tele-skier! The beard, the patched wool sweater, the plaid flannel, the toque, mixed with some practical military pieces. All of it was part of a look I knew well from 30 years earlier.

But it's great seeing today's brands and designers find inspiration in that era and sub-culture and the twists they're putting on it. I'll admit I find some of it overly derivative. For example, I have a hard time seeing a difference between my 1989 Patagonia retropile and some more recent interpretations. On the other hand, things like the fit of the pieces and the way they're being combined with other style genres are really creative and interesting to see (for me at least).

Cheers!
Interesting, hadn't thought of it that way at all.

In my case I grew up in the mountains so everyone mixed "active" wear because there is nothing except a ski jacket that can handle winter at altitude, so good luck with your city overcoat. Also see the 1980s winter wear - even though it was French, for me, and minus the military pieces - in today's hipsters. It was fun watching how the pieces people would mix into their daily wear would indicate their hobby, like Musto or Gill for the sailors. But under, generally the same nondescript suburban look. I would get flak for getting out of the house in walking boots, unless there was really a lot of snow on the road and sidewalk, it "wasn't done". I had a pair of lamb leather derbies with thick lugs for the wet days. As for the early 90s, I remember when Luc Alphand was our hero... maybe I remember wrong but that time seemed more fun and less commercialised and out of touch with normal people. Today's athletes are machines optimised by giant teams for extremely precise movements, it is cool in its own way but bears little resemblance to the origins of these sports. Seeing Aussie cricketeers in fluorescent polyester outfits is just wrong...

In the last ski season pre-covid I rediscovered Vuarnets which are absolutely fantastic in the snow. It's great that they are "in" again or at least that style. Their oversize combined with a helmet keeps it breathable with wide angle of vision without the wind getting too sharp.

Regarding nature, I am semi-fascinated by the Australian bush because it's so large that even without much of an effort (by French standards) towards cleanliness and conservation, you can easily find pristine and enormous areas near major cities for just about anything. This is helped by the Aussie reluctance to build actual roads - outside cities a lot of it is unsealed, often firetrails (where you need a serious 4x4 to get through).

I went skiing in the Kosciuszko National Park and whilst the skiing was awful (think $100/day for a small village hill and slushy snow) the area was incredible. There is a great photo-tale of ski-mountaineering their way through the Australian Alps: https://markoates.exposure.co/australian-alps-walking-track which reminded me of the Pierra Menta Tivoli in spirit.
 

cocostella

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
3,159
Reaction score
1,419
There was a poster on the MtM thread who was really into it and shared illustrations from some site here and there, which I must admit I thoroughly enjoyed. He was a good dood and I dug the gear, though not for my environment. If I lived in the Northwest, or New England I’d be all over it. Very slight hint of Mod, (certainly much more Casuals), but a bit more current with baggier silhouette and hairier vibe. Someone else might remember his handle. The illustrations were cool though. Reminded me of some of the Japanese Ivy stuff.
 
Last edited:

Clouseau

Inspector
Joined
May 18, 2013
Messages
4,536
Reaction score
6,468
There was a poster on the MtM thread who was really into it and shared illustrations from some site here and there, which I must admit I thoroughly enjoyed. He was a good dood and I dug the gear, though not for my environment. If I lived in the Northwest, or New England I’d be all over it. Very slight hint of Mod, (certainly much more Casuals), but a bit more current with baggier silhouette and hairier vibe. Someone else might remember his handle. There’s another name for that scene he used. The site had the same moniker IIRC...
Yes it was AngryYoungandPoor. A very nice guy, he even started a Hikerdelic thread here, that very curiously disappeared.
Sadly AYP left styleforum, he would have been a great addition to this thread.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Favorite knitwear under jackets/sport coats

  • Crewneck sweater

  • Turtleneck sweater

  • Long-sleeve polo

  • Vest

  • I don't like knitwear worn with jackets/sport coats


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
454,594
Messages
9,846,233
Members
205,375
Latest member
biolifeavisfr
Top