• Welcome to our newest affiliate vendor, Threads of Apollo We are very happy to welcome our newest affiliate vendor, Threads of Apollo, a sustainable leather goods company based out of Vancouver, BC, Canada, making premium, made-to-order, water-repellent leather jackets and gloves. .Please help me give them a warm welcome in their new thread.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Help with first pair of Allen Edmonds, quality normal?

dukenukem4ever

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2019
Messages
555
Reaction score
332
Side topic but I think if Allen Edmonds increased prices that might actually serve them better. Bring back made in USA , focus on quality control. Maybe they can do what loake does for their lower end line they construct upper outside of uk and finish in uk.
Sorry iPhone swipe to type.
 

dukenukem4ever

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2019
Messages
555
Reaction score
332
They can have have their prized lines like park event and fifth Ave updated. Higher quality leather shaker batch more hand work involved etc ... it could work. And stop offering discounts.
 

BespokeBrooklyn

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2013
Messages
610
Reaction score
195
My only advice is that I have spent too much time worrying about what other people think of the shoes I’m wearing and too little time enjoying the shoes I already have. If the small defects that nobody will be able to see when they are actually on your feet don’t bother you, wear them and feel fly when you do so! And check @dieworkwear’s blogs for advice on what to wear with them.
 

JFWR

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
1,991
Reaction score
2,966
Hi, excited to have purchased my first pair of quality shoes. They are Allen Edmonds (ordered new online). I've noticed a few issues and wanted to know if these are ok/normal or should it be of concern? Thanks for any help/insights.
Most of what you show is not a problem whatsoever.

However, there are two points which are problems that I think are worth returning the shoes for:

1. The misaligned heels, which are like, blatantly misaligned. That may in fact affect your gate and the wear in a way that you don't want it to.

2. The stitching on the toe which is showing the inner stitch on - in other words, you now have an intrusion of the outside world into the inner of your shoes, which is NEVER good. That's a pretty bad welting job right there.

I would recommend taking these back for those two problems alone.

On the other hand, everything else you mention is just minor imperfections and/or just not a problem at all. A full grained leather shoe is full grained because it shows the actual texture of the skin, so you're just showing us grain which is not a problem at all. Moreover, the one big aesthetic consideration is beneath the buckles of the shoe where it will never be seen and where it poses no structural problem.

No shoe is 100% perfect. These shoes have two flaws that are worth taking back, but the other problems wouldn't be a problem at all.
 

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
3,027
Reaction score
2,442
Chipped paint and a door ding are minor too but would you drive a brand new car off the lot due to these minor issues?
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
21,238
Reaction score
51,104
Chipped paint and a door ding are minor too but would you drive a brand new car off the lot due to these minor issues?
Why do men love taking very normal topics, like shoes, and try to make them more "relatable" by comparing them to the purchasing of cars?
 

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
3,027
Reaction score
2,442
Why do men love taking very normal topics, like shoes, and try to make them more "relatable" by comparing them to the purchasing of cars?
why do men who would otherwise but very meticulous about such things all of a sudden act if the same expectations were not valid for shoes.
 

PROFusioNZ

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Thanks for all the responses guys. They're all appreciated. These shoes are suppose to be new not seconds. Since these are my first quality shoes, I don't want to be nitpicking minor details but I also expect a certain level of quality for this price (it's high for me)

Seems like there's varying responses on this too, hmmm....
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
21,238
Reaction score
51,104
Thanks for all the responses guys. They're all appreciated. These shoes are suppose to be new not seconds. Since these are my first quality shoes, I don't want to be nitpicking minor details but I also expect a certain level of quality for this price (it's high for me)

Seems like there's varying responses on this too, hmmm....
I mostly think you should reconsider how you plan to wear those. Tan shoes are a bit more particular than medium or dark brown shoes, and double monks carry a sort of 2010 #menswear connotation. Not that you can't wear double monks well. But tan double monks might be harder to pull off than, say, a pair of medium brown suede chukkas.

If this is your first pair of nice shoes, I assume you're just starting to build a better wardrobe. I think medium brown suede chukkas will be something that can grow with you as your taste and style evolve. Whereas the flash of tan double monks might get old after a year or two -- well before resoling even becomes an issue.
 

PROFusioNZ

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
I mostly think you should reconsider how you plan to wear those. Tan shoes are a bit more particular than medium or dark brown shoes, and double monks carry a sort of 2010 #menswear connotation. Not that you can't wear double monks well. But tan double monks might be harder to pull off than, say, a pair of medium brown suede chukkas.

If this is your first pair of nice shoes, I assume you're just starting to build a better wardrobe. I think medium brown suede chukkas will be something that can grow with you as your taste and style evolve. Whereas the flash of tan double monks might get old after a year or two -- well before resoling even becomes an issue.
Thanks for the response. I really like the look of double monks. Is it mainly because of the lighter color? If these were a darker brown would it be reasonable? Yes for my second pair, it will be either chukkas or chelseas. Thanks
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
21,238
Reaction score
51,104
Thanks for the response. I really like the look of double monks. Is it mainly because of the lighter color? If these were a darker brown would it be reasonable? Yes for my second pair, it will be either chukkas or chelseas. Thanks
Tan shoes require the right wardrobe. For the purpose of narrowing the discussion and making it more manageable, I'll only talk about classic men's style. Things are different in other aesthetics (more on this later).

But let's focus on classic men's style. I think these looks are bad:

tumblr_oofpd2Eiyk1qa2j8co7_r1_540.jpeg
tumblr_oofpd2Eiyk1qa2j8co6_r1_1280.jpeg
tumblr_oofpd2Eiyk1qa2j8co1_500.jpeg



If you're looking to dress in a more classic way, the focus of an outfit is usually on the upper half of your outfit, and often the v-shaped space just below your chin (if you're wearing a tailored jacket, this is the intersection between the jacket, tie, and shirt).

When you wear tan shoes, the eye tends to get dragged downward. This is especially true of suits, as you see above. The tan shoes shine out from under the pants like a beacon.

tumblr_ns8txlazcQ1qa2j8co2_1280.jpeg
tumblr_ns8txlazcQ1qa2j8co3_500.jpeg



To wear tan shoes well, you often need a certain wardrobe to support it. For example, they go well with lighter colored suits, such that the darkest part of an outfit is still the shoes. Imagine a grey suit with brown shoes, and then lightening everything a few shades. Now you have a dove grey suits with tan shoes. Same thing with a brown suit with dark brown shoes. Lighten everything up and you have a khaki colored suit and tan shoes. This combo works and the focus is again at the v-shaped space under the chin. The shoes no longer become the brightest part of the outfit.


tumblr_oofpd2Eiyk1qa2j8co5_r1_1280.png
tumblr_ns8txlazcQ1qa2j8co4_1280.jpeg
121125809_197130545121709_7907592978786666843_n-1024x509.jpg



You can also wear tan shoes with lighter colored sport coats, either with trousers that are lighter or darker than the sport coat. If the sport coat is lighter than the pants, then you've balanced out the brightness of the shoes with the brightness of the coat. If the sport coat is darker than the pants, then we have the same principle as the suits mentioned above. A classic menswear outfit is a darker coat worn with mid-colored pants and darker shoes. Imagine just doing this and lighten up everything a few shades -- voila, the tan shoes work.



07-an-elegant-summer-work-look-with-a-white-shirt-a-navy-blazer-grey-pants-brown-shoes-and-su...jpeg
c93d81ad67f8d637430bea181bcc83dd.jpeg



Most men, however, don't have these kinds of clothes. If they have a suit, it's likely a dark worsted. If they have a sport coat, it's likely a navy sport coat or dark brown tweed. If they have tailored trousers, it's likely mid-grey wool or tan chinos.

The outfits just often end up having very questionable taste. Perhaps unfairly, I also associate tan double monks with guys who wear clothes that are too tight.


huckberry-x-chippewa-quot-service-boot-in-roughout-tan-goodyear-welt-construction-for-a-resol...jpeg
SB-Honey-Tanned-Horse-j-11.jpeg



There are some exceptions and other aesthetics work on different principles. You can wear tan pebble-grained boots with jeans, a Shetland sweater, and a Barbour jacket. Tan service boots also work well with many workwear outfits. Different aesthetics can run on different principles

Mostly, it's hard to go wrong with medium or dark brown shoes in most aesthetics. So as your wardrobe grows and you learn how to dress in ways that are pleasing, you may find that tan shoes are limiting.
 
Last edited:

Jmr928

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
1,170
Reaction score
5,588
Thanks for the response. I really like the look of double monks. Is it mainly because of the lighter color? If these were a darker brown would it be reasonable? Yes for my second pair, it will be either chukkas or chelseas. Thanks
I think it would be helpful to know how you plan to wear them as well and what you’d want to pair it with. DWW posted some examples - If you’re thinking of something you can wear with a sport coat or a suit that’s a different need than mostly denim/chinos and occasionally trousers and a jacket. A medium to dark brown will be more versatile if you’re just starting. Signed, a guy who has a pair of double monks in a lighter shade of medium brown sitting in a box in my closet that get worn maybe once a year.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Styleforum x S.E.H Kelly Balmacaan: Choose the Fabric

  • standard 5 — light and dark brown

    Votes: 8 6.5%
  • standard 7 — dark brown and charcoal

    Votes: 17 13.7%
  • wide 1 — charcoal and blue-grey

    Votes: 7 5.6%
  • wide 3 — barley and brown

    Votes: 5 4.0%
  • wide 5 — charcoal and dark navy

    Votes: 10 8.1%
  • wide 6 — charcoal and black

    Votes: 3 2.4%
  • wide 7 — dark green and black

    Votes: 29 23.4%
  • wide 8 — malt and dark brown

    Votes: 10 8.1%
  • wide 9 — blue-grey and charcoal

    Votes: 35 28.2%

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
458,106
Messages
9,935,894
Members
207,042
Latest member
blackbuu49
Top