• We are thrilled to welcome Capra Leather to the Styleforum family of official Affiliate Vendors.They are a hand crafted, made to order leather goods family company. Their products have unique designs with a aesthetic that blend minimalism, tradition and functionality. Focused on sustainability they offer a lifetime warranty on every piece.

    Give Capra a warm welcome on their Official Affiliate Thread

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Help me translate this phrase to latin:

Aperipan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
619
Reaction score
1
" Young men, observe the time and fly away from evil."

I'm writing a poem for class and would like to have this phrase in latin at the start of my poem, kind of like T.S. Eliot's Prufrock. Thanks.
 

ysc

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
2,265
Reaction score
8
Usually if you are going to do something like this you use a genuine Latin tag/quote rather than just translating something that you like.
 

JLibourel

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2004
Messages
8,269
Reaction score
485
Without having a Latin Dictionary handy:

"Juvenes, tempus spectate, malum fugate."
 

Connemara

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Mar 9, 2006
Messages
38,318
Reaction score
1,747
Originally Posted by youngscientist
Usually if you are going to do something like this you use a genuine Latin tag/quote rather than just translating something that you like.
+1.
 

itsstillmatt

The Liberator
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Mar 11, 2006
Messages
13,971
Reaction score
2,085
Quella boquina mama te. I am sure this is correct, though perhaps not the spelling.
 

T4phage

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2003
Messages
5,974
Reaction score
670
Originally Posted by iammatt
Quella boquina mama te. I am sure this is correct, though perhaps not the spelling.

mmmmm...
delishush tears to be coming my way Aperipan?
 

dkzzzz

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Messages
5,294
Reaction score
21
Originally Posted by Aperipan
" Young men, observe the time and fly away from evil."

I'm writing a poem for class and would like to have this phrase in latin at the start of my poem, kind of like T.S. Eliot's Prufrock. Thanks.


That phrase makes no sense in English what would Latin do?
 

Aperipan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
619
Reaction score
1
Originally Posted by JLibourel
Without having a Latin Dictionary handy:

"Juvenes, tempus spectate, malum fugate."


Thanks, this sounds about right.
 

Prexaspes

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
No offence to Jlibourel, but there is an error in this. Perhaps more correctly:

Iuvenes, tempus servate et malum fugite (not fugate, which means something different).
 

ysc

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
2,265
Reaction score
8
Seriously if you want to start a poem with a quote it has to be a real one, not one you have just made up.
Also your quote does not properly make sense in english, usually when a translated quote does not make perfect sense it is due to problems translating from one language to another, not because it was written in a weird way, if whoever is marking this is switched on you will get penalised for it.
If you really want to start of with a quote and you don't have one to hand look around on the internet.

Also the quote at the beginning of Prufrock is from dante, so not in latin but tuscan, which is neither here nor there I suppose.
 

Star

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2008
Messages
582
Reaction score
3
All due respect to the OP and his question however since we are on this topic what would be the equivalent in Latin (and not literal translation) of something like ' Go and F..k Yourself' and/or 'I will smite thee'.
 

Etienne

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2006
Messages
4,444
Reaction score
23
Originally Posted by dkzzzz
That phrase makes no sense in English what would Latin do?
Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum videtur.
 

Aperipan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
619
Reaction score
1
Originally Posted by Étienne
Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum videtur.

???
 

JLibourel

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2004
Messages
8,269
Reaction score
485
Originally Posted by Prexaspes
No offence to Jlibourel, but there is an error in this. Perhaps more correctly:

Iuvenes, tempus servate et malum fugite (not fugate, which means something different).


You got me there! I confused "fugo/fugare" (rout, put to flight) with "fugio, fugere" (flee).
 

Prexaspes

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Originally Posted by JLibourel
You got me there! I confused "fugo/fugare" (rout, put to flight) with "fugio, fugere" (flee).

Well, I am a classical scholar by profession, so allegedly at least I know about this sort of thing. Yes, fugio=I flee, fugo=I put to flight...
 

Featured Sponsor

What do you normally wear on Mondays at work?

  • Suit, shirt, and tie

  • Suit and shirt, no tie

  • Dress shirt and trousers, jacket or sport coat, tie

  • Dress shirt and trousers, jacket or sport coat, no tie

  • Dress shirt and trousers, no tie or jacket

  • Casual trousers and shirt (polo, t-shirt, etc.)


Results are only viewable after voting.

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
483,430
Messages
10,287,212
Members
216,237
Latest member
Twobucktin
Top