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Heavy weight suit instead of overcoat

porcelain monkey

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I like the heavy three piece suit as overcoat look. I tend to not wear an overcoat unless it is absolutely necessary anyway, and have been thinking of getting a heavy three piece. My father did this several years ago (he calls it his snowsuit), which has actually discouraged me. I'm not quite ready to turn into the old man just yet.
 

SkinnyGoomba

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Originally Posted by Sator
1+

Hopefully, the global financial crisis will also encourage organisations to look to turning down the thermostat as a means of saving money too. Anyone here in a position to speak out in an organisation should do so on the grounds of saving money and helping the environment etc.

It is high time we returned to wearing clothes as a means of keeping ourselves warm rather than relying on CO2 producing devices. That means wearing an extra layer of clothes, made of winter materials eg wool, cashmere. Having to strip down to your shirt because it is overbearingly hot when it is subzero outside is an absurd waste of energy and money. The only reason it is possible for modern man to wear cotton trousers (eg jeans) and t-shirt in winter is because of intense central heating.


+1 my house/office is kept a temp where i'm more comfortable wearing a sweater, then not. Its really not unreasonable unless you think you can wear a t-shirt and jeans.
 

Will

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Originally Posted by Sator
1+

It is high time we returned to wearing clothes as a means of keeping ourselves warm rather than relying on CO2 producing devices. That means wearing an extra layer of clothes, made of winter materials eg wool, cashmere. Having to strip down to your shirt because it is overbearingly hot when it is subzero outside is an absurd waste of energy and money. The only reason it is possible for modern man to wear cotton trousers (eg jeans) and t-shirt in winter is because of intense central heating.


I agree it feels better to wear clothes but I'd like to see a carbon analysis. My heavy suits have wool that's shorn in New Zealand, flown to England, and then flown across the Atlantic a couple of times before I wear it. Multiply that for everyone in those buildings with lowered thermostats and I wonder what the net affect on the planet is.

And that's not taking into account the impact of the millions of extra sheep that would be required. Sheep pollute.
 

needshoehelp

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Why would you want to? Overcoats look great! And besides, do you really want your suit exposed in the rain and snow?
 

Film Noir Buff

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Originally Posted by Will
I agree it feels better to wear clothes but I'd like to see a carbon analysis. My heavy suits have wool that's shorn in New Zealand, flown to England, and then flown across the Atlantic a couple of times before I wear it. Multiply that for everyone in those buildings with lowered thermostats and I wonder what the net affect on the planet is. And that's not taking into account the impact of the millions of extra sheep that would be required. Sheep pollute.
Forget about pollute, sheep are an actual threat. Just look what they did to this guy's suit!
zombiesheepsq4.jpg
 

Lear

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I won't waste space quoting and thanking everyone. Great replies.

OK, so I understand that I might still need an overcoat if it gets really cold. Whatever the case, I just like the look of heavier weight suits.

Anyone have links to what a 16 -20 Oz flannel, 3 piece (or 2 piece) suit might look like. I like the idea, just hope it wouldn't look too clunky and stiff. Is above 20 Oz an insane thought?

Off-topic: I'm formulating a dastardly plan for late 2009. Considering Anderson & Sheppard for my first ever bespoke suit (possibly as above) I love charcoal grey.

I already have a mild weather suit.

Just need 2 suits, then I'll be set for life. Finish!

Lear
 

Holdfast

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Originally Posted by needshoehelp
Why would you want to? Overcoats look great! And besides, do you really want your suit exposed in the rain and snow?

+1

I love overcoats too! Probably too much, because I have way more than I need, but I just love the shape & drama they create. The only good part of cold weather is being able to wear a nice overcoat!

Originally Posted by Lear
Just need 2 suits, then I'll be set for life. Finish!

laugh.gif
Famous last words if you stick around here!
laugh.gif
 

JayJay

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Originally Posted by Holdfast
+1

I love overcoats too! Probably too much, because I have way more than I need, but I just love the shape & drama they create. The only good part of cold weather is being able to wear a nice overcoat!



Oh, I like overcoats, too. I actually feel incompletely dressed if I don't wear one when its cold outside, not to mention liking the look and drape of a properly fitting overcoat. However, I'll go sans overcoat for convenience. When I need to slip away from an event without being noticed, or when my coat will be among hundreds on racks, then I'm more likely to go without.
 

Sator

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Originally Posted by Lear
Anyone have links to what a 16 -20 Oz flannel, 3 piece (or 2 piece) suit might look like. I like the idea, just hope it wouldn't look too clunky and stiff. Is above 20 Oz an insane thought?

Off-topic: I'm formulating a dastardly plan for late 2009. Considering Anderson & Sheppard for my first ever bespoke suit (possibly as above) I love charcoal grey.


Harrisons-LBD offer a number of good heavier worsteds in the 18 Oz range. A&S should offer them, or at least be able to source them for you.

Here is a 20 Oz three piece:

20OzThreePiece4.jpg


I think a 20-23 Oz worsted would be perfectly wearable. The real difficulty is finding anything in this weight range. Michael Alden has a Heavyweight Division project going over at LL that you should check out. However, I doubt that A&S accept customers' cloths, so you may have to consider someone who would likely gladly accept an LL cloth such as the ex-A&S cutter Edwin DeBoise (who is said to be more A&S than A&S):

http://www.steed.co.uk/
 

Lear

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Originally Posted by Sator
Harrisons-LBD offer a number of good heavier worsteds in the 18 Oz range. A&S should offer them, or at least be able to source them for you.

Here is a 20 Oz three piece:

20OzThreePiece4.jpg


I think a 20-23 Oz worsted would be perfectly wearable. The real difficulty is finding anything in this weight range. Michael Alden has a Heavyweight Division project going over at LL that you should check out. However, I doubt that A&S accept customers' cloths, so you may have to consider someone who would likely gladly accept an LL cloth such as the ex-A&S cutter Edwin DeBoise (who is said to be more A&S than A&S):

http://www.steed.co.uk/


Thanks Sator

That's what I'm talking about. Looks sharp. If I can carry Aero FQHH, I'm sure I can do 18+ Oz wool.

The London Lounge site is very interesting. It'll keep me reading for a while.

I'm not hung up on using a 'name' tailor. Have to start somewhere though, and with my limited knowledge, might as well go to an established company. Will look into Steed though.

A & S suits look fab. More to the point, I think they'll sit well on my frame. At the moment, I look at a suit, and instantly know whether I like it or not. I just don't know WHY. Guess that comes with experience and knowledge.
 

JayJay

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Originally Posted by Sator
20OzThreePiece4.jpg


A bit off topic, but this suit looks terrific. The pairing with the pink shirt is not what would have come to my mind, but this looks great together. The fit is excellent.
 

The Doctor

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Originally Posted by Lear
I've been considering clothing for next winter.

Has anyone gone down the route of dispensing with the overcoat altogether, and having a 3-piece suit made up in extra heavy fabric. I'm guessing that it would need to be bespoke, and something like 16oz plus.

I find an overcoat a hassle to store and take care of, both on the journey, and when you arrive at your destination.

I know that this couldn't work in Moscow or Chicago. How about the UK though?

Lear


Lear, Browne & Dunsford have a bunch, their Pedersen & Becker, which ranges from 15/16oz, 17/18oz, & 19/20oz classic cloths, stripes, checks & worsted flannel.

Edwin DeBoise

www.steed.co.uk
 

Lear

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Originally Posted by The Doctor
Lear, Browne & Dunsford have a bunch, their Pedersen & Becker, which ranges from 15/16oz, 17/18oz, & 19/20oz classic cloths, stripes, checks & worsted flannel.

Edwin DeBoise

www.steed.co.uk


I'll have to go with Lear, Browne & Dunsford, if only for the name. Sorted.
 

Lear

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Originally Posted by Sator
That's the LBD in the Harrisons-LBD I mentioned. They are the only ones who offer quality worsteds in a decent weight left.
Yep, was aware of that from your earlier post. One notch down from 'extreme' is what I'm considering. So, it'll probably be 18 Oz. Lots of things to consider until I take the plunge though. I can imagine what a hindrance it must be, for a tailor to have to deal with half-informed customers. I know nothing. That's why, when I do the deal, I'll be entering the door armed only with colour (charcoal) & idea of cloth (heavyweight). The rest I'll leave to the man with the ponytail (pigtails better) to advise on. Lear
 

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