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Harry Rosen is a real gentleman

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by EL72, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. jefferyd

    jefferyd Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Cool. When is the next Samuelsohn sale? [​IMG]
    Will keep you posted.....
     
  2. Master-Classter

    Master-Classter Senior member

    Messages:
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    Jul 18, 2007
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Damn, I wish I knew about that even over at MaRS. Any notes from Mr. Rosen that you can share with us?

    That's a really nice story about your family friend. They must really want to keep him as a repeat customer.


    I think our friend is a pretty good customer, so they wanted to keep him for sure.

    Some summary notes from the presentation:
    - Customers aren't always educated. They won't tell you that though. they need to be taught and explained what the item is and why it's good. When you and them look at something, they don't see what you do because you know so much about it, they don't know what to look for. So explain to them all about it, and only then talk about the price. The features justify the price, versus telling them the price first and then either they walk away or you end up just trying to justify the price.
    - get the customer involved in the process. make them just fit things on and look and feel the garment, not just stare at a mannequin. They have the experience the item
    - create customer profiles to tailor services. Know their measurements, preferences, what they've already purchased, etc. (although I will say that Harry himself, even just through the few anecdotes he told, seems to have a particular knack for remembering personal details).
    - use your customers as salespeople. Give them such good service that they tell others about it, or, even just ask them directly for names/numbers of their colleagues, bosses, wives, etc.
    - present information/displays in a way that makes sense to the way men shop. Don't just put all the suits together, create mini collections/"looks" that create an overall style or image that can be purchased together.

    Now, personally, I think that these are a few very good insights into how to be a good SA, and Mr. Rosen managed to really take these few points and turn it into quite a successful chain of stores, applying what he learned over the years as a salesmen. I will however say, that IMO I do attribute some of their "success" to a simple lack of any decent competitors... still, I have respect for the man and think the company on average does a very good job.
     
  3. Albern

    Albern Senior member

    Messages:
    899
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Location:
    Second star to the right and straight on 'til morn
    I think our friend is a pretty good customer, so they wanted to keep him for sure.

    Some summary notes from the presentation:
    - Customers aren't always educated. They won't tell you that though. they need to be taught and explained what the item is and why it's good. When you and them look at something, they don't see what you do because you know so much about it, they don't know what to look for. So explain to them all about it, and only then talk about the price. The features justify the price, versus telling them the price first and then either they walk away or you end up just trying to justify the price.
    - get the customer involved in the process. make them just fit things on and look and feel the garment, not just stare at a mannequin. They have the experience the item
    - create customer profiles to tailor services. Know their measurements, preferences, what they've already purchased, etc. (although I will say that Harry himself, even just through the few anecdotes he told, seems to have a particular knack for remembering personal details).
    - use your customers as salespeople. Give them such good service that they tell others about it, or, even just ask them directly for names/numbers of their colleagues, bosses, wives, etc.
    - present information/displays in a way that makes sense to the way men shop. Don't just put all the suits together, create mini collections/"looks" that create an overall style or image that can be purchased together.

    Now, personally, I think that these are a few very good insights into how to be a good SA, and Mr. Rosen managed to really take these few points and turn it into quite a successful chain of stores, applying what he learned over the years as a salesmen. I will however say, that IMO I do attribute some of their "success" to a simple lack of any decent competitors... still, I have respect for the man and think the company on average does a very good job.


    Thanks D for sharing all of that. Yes, I do agree with you when you say HR has been quite successful on both fronts; the trickle down effect based on Harry's own sales principles (although not always consistent) and the fact that no other high end men's store in Canada offers the kind of variety or competitiveness that HR does. Obviously there is always room for improvement so who knows...
     
  4. Christofuh

    Christofuh Senior member

    Messages:
    2,929
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2006
    Location:
    Sarcasmograd
    What's this about ?
    ↓↓↓


    [​IMG]
     

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