1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Hand Held Steamer: Getting Out Wrinkles

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by singlechange, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. singlechange

    singlechange Senior member

    Messages:
    494
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    I thought I'd share something most forum members might find useful.
    Recently I acquired a fine suit and it came from Germany packaged in FedEx box really too small for it. The jacket and trousers were folded so many times that the wool was wrinkled in many areas. I recalled reading a thread somewhere here on the subject of clothes steamers and found one on the internet and ordered. Today I removed all the wrinkles on my fine Italian suit within a few minutes. Highly recommeded. It's the hand held model made in the U.S. of A. called Jiffy Esteam and retails for about $70. It takes about a cup of tap or distilled water to reach steaming vapor in a few minutes and you just lightly touch the garment and make a few vertical passes. It's the perfect size at about 12 inches in length with large handle and a generous nine foot chord. Best of all you can travel with it.
     
  2. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

    Messages:
    32,345
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Thanks for sharing. There is a kiosk selling these at the local mall.
     
  3. nelly

    nelly Senior member

    Messages:
    248
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    is that steamer effective on shirts? Not just getting out wrinkles but adding a nice crispness like an iron does.
     
  4. singlechange

    singlechange Senior member

    Messages:
    494
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    I acquired the Jiffy portable steamer for my fine suits and cashmere coats, ties and scarfs. For pressing my Kiton and Fray dress shirts I stick to my trusty Rowenta after handwashing. The steamer works well taking wrinkles out of the dress shirts that have been folded for travel or storage but it doesn't replace careful ironing for that crispness you want.
     
  5. mrchapel

    mrchapel Senior member

    Messages:
    679
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Location:
    Southern California
    I have a similar one made by Sunbeam that does the job. It's no replacement for proper ironing/dry cleaning, but it's best suited to remove shirt wrinkles. Removing wrinkles from jackets takes some effort.
     
  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

    Messages:
    20,605
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    greater chicago
    I have one, and like it alot
     
  7. wrldfamouscook

    wrldfamouscook New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    I too have a Jiffy steamer. It must be a bigger model as it is not suitable for traveling. In addition to being good for suits, shirts and other things, it also is good to help remove the shine you get from ironing on wool.
     
  8. Sartorially Challenged

    Sartorially Challenged Senior member

    Messages:
    577
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Would they work to create that rumpled look I like on my casual shirts?

    What I mean is... I am too lazy to iron my casual shirts, and sending them out to launder commercially results in that dress shirt "crisp" look I do not like in some of my casual shirts.

    If I washed my casual shirts regularly at home and then used the hand-held steamer, would I get that slightly crumpled look? Or does it only work in removing wrinkles from an otherwise already pressed shirt?
     
  9. luk-cha

    luk-cha Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    4,534
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Location:
    Was Sinndom, Now is Rolexdom
    perhap some1 should sell or give 1 to thom browne![​IMG] i have got a couple 1 at the office and 1 at home i think they are great esp when the misses is not around[​IMG]
     
  10. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    5,720
    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    Location:
    London
    If I washed my casual shirts regularly at home and then used the hand-held steamer, would I get that slightly crumpled look? Or does it only work in removing wrinkles from an otherwise already pressed shirt?
    Try hang-drying your shirts. For a bit less "crumpling", toss them in the dryer for a few minutes before hanging.
     
  11. Sartorially Challenged

    Sartorially Challenged Senior member

    Messages:
    577
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Tried that already. A bit too crumpled looking. I know I am being finicky, but I am going for that slightly crumpled look -- somewhere between the hang-dried, slightly-machined dried look AND the commercially laundered look.

    Would the hand steamer work in creating that look?
     
  12. stach

    stach Senior member

    Messages:
    578
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    The easiest way to achieve the look you want is to send the shirts out, no starch, then steam them at home.
     
  13. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

    Messages:
    2,114
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    I'm glad to hear about this gadget. I have owned hand held steamers. Had bad luck, with them. One of them spewed water all over a jacket, virtually destroying it. This was years ago . . . I shall look into this model. Thanks for the tip!
     
  14. Tomasso

    Tomasso Senior member

    Messages:
    4,078
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    somewhere between the hang-dried, slightly-machined dried look AND the commercially laundered look.

    Hang dry and then use a warm iron (medium heat setting, no steam) to touch up the shirt.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by