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Guys, how many of you can honestly tell if somebody is wearing a quality suit?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by spidercan, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. spidercan

    spidercan Senior member

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    Hmm this is more commonly done on mannequins not on real life models. The majority of the model photos had rear views as well as front views, some had 360 degree videos. I did a quick check for real life photos, and they weren't noticeably slimmer. And honestly if it can be pinned it can be tailored the same way (and wouldn't that mean a cheap suit with a slim cut takes priority over construction?)...so a bit of a moot point.


    And really I'm way too tired to go through and re-upload real people photos, just give it a shot :)


    Edit: All of the non-styleforum approved suits had at least rear shots if not videos
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2013
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  2. Claghorn

    Claghorn Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I hope someone has said this already, but comparing different suits when new is a little silly. Yeah, the higher end will generally look better, but the real test of the suit is how it will look after a year or two of wear. Line up a well worn JAB next to a well worn Hugo Boss next to a well worn Brooks Brothers next to a well worn Zegna and most anyone will be able to spot which is higher quality.
     
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  3. spidercan

    spidercan Senior member

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    I disagree, I don't think most people go out in well-worn suits. When suits get well-worn they get replaced. That being said, one could argue that well made suits last longer (which is another separate although tangentially related controversy).
     
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  4. Claghorn

    Claghorn Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I don't mean worn out. And there is an obvious gradient between looking new and looking like a suit needing to replaced. A good suit will look better, more natural, more relaxed after a year of wear (maybe 2-3 times a month depending on rotation). A cheap suit won't.

    I see cheap suits constantly--I live in a city where even cellphone salesmen wear suits. There is more to a suit than how it looks when it is new. And a cheap suit starts looking cheap--if it didn't already--very quickly. Folks can only wear a suit for the first time once.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  5. Trompe le Monde

    Trompe le Monde Senior member

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    answer C) dont concern yourself whether what someone has on is expensive or not
     
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  6. archibaldleach

    archibaldleach Senior member

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    Interesting thread. I honestly pay much more attention to how someone's suit fits and what type of silhouette it has, which are probably the most important factors in determining how it looks, rather than anything else. Occasionally I see fabric that just looks cheap, awful pattern matching or other giveaways but I generally am not looking for them. I agree with others who have said that it gets harder to tell how expensive a suit is above a certain level.
     
  7. VinnyMac

    VinnyMac Senior member

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    Besides this site, I don't look at other people's clothes closely enough to be able to make that call. Unless you're a woman, I probably won't even notice what you're wearing. When I do notice, it usually doesn't go any further than basic fit issues (pants length, shoulder fit). That's usually enough for me to move on.

    For those who do actually analyze other people's clothes in real life, most of them can't tell shxt. They don't have x-ray vision, and they usually don't get to feel the fabric. All that they can do is point out whether the suit has features that they associate with expensive clothing. Most of it has to do with how the suit fits; the rest of it is rationalized bullshxt. Obviously, on this site, there's a larger proportion of expensive suits, so it's easy to guess correctly here, but in real life, you can't tell.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
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  8. MZhammer

    MZhammer Senior member

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    Well I can't tell if it's an expensive suit but I can usually tell if it's a canvassed suit, like you said, by the lapel roll and how it moves on the body. Fused suits get pretty easy to pick out after you've seen enough of them.

    I used to sell suits and it became a bit of a game to tell if a man was wearing a canvassed or a fused suit when he walked in. But really, from far away it's just a guess. Once you're close I have a better idea but who studies it that closely? Now that I don't work there anymore I could care less what others are wearing.

    On that note, I had one customer who adamantly required we leave that on. He said he wanted the label to stay on the sleeve to show others the brand. No matter how many times I told him that wasn't the way suits or coats are worn, he didn't let me remove them. He bought probably 3 suits and 1 overcoat that way.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  9. comrade

    comrade Senior member

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    I once worked for a guy who was very good looking and quite well-dressed who occasionally came to work
    with the jacket label still affixed to his sleeve and the pockets stil sewn shut.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  10. MisterFu

    MisterFu Senior member

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    Just out of curiosity, what brand of suit was he so adamant about advertising on his sleeve? I hope it wasn't Pronto Uomo...
     
  11. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    Come to think it over, probably the biggest giveaway is not the suit itself but the shoes. If a guy is wearing a pair of unshined casual bluchers with thick rubber soles (something I see all too often), I immediately surmise the suit is probably a cheapie.
     
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  12. MZhammer

    MZhammer Senior member

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    The suits were Canali and the jacket was Burberry... IIRC
     
  13. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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    Ha, you're probably right. A quality pair of shoes is a more foreign idea to people than a quality suit...
     
  14. CrimsonSox

    CrimsonSox Senior member

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    It's interesting that the standard of connoisseurship in painting is to be able to recognize the artist in a work that one has not seen before. I would think that with enough experience and training, one might be able to tell the difference, not only between an expensive and cheap suit, but between a Huntsman and A&S, or a Roman and a Neapolitan style suit. For instance, a cran necker lapel and roped shoulders can give away a Parisian suit. Part of the benefit of looking at Styleforum and other sources is to develop an eye for the tailoring details that, like brushstroke and color, can identify an artist.
     
  15. VinnyMac

    VinnyMac Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
  16. Claghorn

    Claghorn Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    This is the first place I look as well.
     
  17. MisterFu

    MisterFu Senior member

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    You mean shoes like these:
    [​IMG]
    The picture above makes me sad (that such a thing should exist).
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  18. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Senior member

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    Why do you think this is so funny?
     
  19. Joshua Paul

    Joshua Paul Member

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    hi gentlemen,

    I was reading the above, and I read something about cleaners who press your lapel flat.
    Now, I just bought a tailor made suit, but it was a cheap job and the lapel rolls don't seem to be done properly.

    Is there a way to fix this? What makes the lapel roll anyway, the inner canvas? And do the use heat to roll it?
    Hence if it isn't rolled properly, it is possible that the didn't craft the suit properly?

    Regards,
    Joshua
     
  20. CrimsonSox

    CrimsonSox Senior member

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    I would be the first to say that my own eye is not well trained enough to recognize the maker of a suit on sight. But as you get more experience looking at clothes, you start to pick up on more details. For instance, it's rare to find a cran necker lapel on a non-French suit. If a suit is straight hanging with lapped seams, a hook center vent, no darts, and 3-roll-2 buttons, it's likely J. Press or a similar traditional American clothier. If painting seems too "high art" of an analogy, think of antique dealers. After enough years they can start to identify the maker or at least the general school of certain kinds of furniture. I'm sure there are a lot of people who can do the same thing with cars.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013

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