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Gun Club Check Appreciation Thread

Manton

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The book is called Scottish Estate Tweeds, by E. P. Harrison.
 

Film Noir Buff

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Originally Posted by TC (Houston)
You've lost me. But I did get the implication that my inquiry does not merit a meaningful response. Thanks for the help.

I don't think it's personal. There may not be an answer. These things developed before the great age of the neurotic compulsive. We don't really know where pin stripes come from but that doesn't stop me from wearing them, or enjoying them. If someone is in the industry, they'll know what you are talking about. If they aren't, I don't see what you gain with the history of the gun check at your finger tips. I dont even know what sort of person, assuming anyone even knows this stuff, would respond to your question. It's almost Tom-Sawyer-gets-others-to-paint-the-fence like. I have encountered personalities that think being an encyclopedia of facts means they're right all the time but I really haven't ever seen them amount to anything but ostracized. So, in many ways because of my regard for you, I am trying to keep you the very pleasant, enjoyable person that you are.
 

james_timothy

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Amazon says the last publishing was 1995.
 

oscarthewild

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Originally Posted by Mildly Consumptive
I just picked up this gun-club from the tailor-man a few weeks ago.





Originally Posted by Manton
^^^ I am having a fitting in that this Friday.



Suit (3 pc?) or just a SC? The pic of '80s polo illustrates how versatile something like this can be as a suit. The SC works well with flannels and cords.
The trousers work well with Barbour / quilted type jackets.

Difficulty is that so many of these patterns are just not strong enough for trousers. They bag rather quickly.



Originally Posted by I. Gentantithesis
AndyTrad thread photo, '80s Polo. Classic Turf Accountant's ensemble.


There's a photo of Evelyn Waugh in an (almost) identical suit. Can't find it on the webz.
 

Manton

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It's a shetland; jacket only.
 

Sterling Gillette

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Originally Posted by Mildly Consumptive
I just picked up this gun-club from the tailor-man a few weeks ago.
Originally Posted by Manton
^^^ I am having a fitting in that this Friday.

My tailor has put a jacket length of that same cloth aside for me but I pobably won't have it made up until autum 2010.

Originally Posted by Parker

Very subtle effect, I like it!
 

TC (Houston)

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Originally Posted by Will
About thirty years ago Johnstons of Elgin updated a book titled Scottish District Checks (it's not handy and I could have the publisher wrong but the title is correct). It has histories and photos of hundreds of estate tweeds, including the gun clubs. Copies are still around in used book stores.

Originally Posted by Manton
The book is called Scottish Estate Tweeds, by E. P. Harrison.

Originally Posted by james_timothy

Amazon says the last publishing was 1995.


Thank you, gentlemen. I've made a note of that one.

Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff
I don't think it's personal. There may not be an answer. These things developed before the great age of the neurotic compulsive. We don't really know where pin stripes come from but that doesn't stop me from wearing them, or enjoying them.

If someone is in the industry, they'll know what you are talking about. If they aren't, I don't see what you gain with the history of the gun check at your finger tips. I dont even know what sort of person, assuming anyone even knows this stuff, would respond to your question. It's almost Tom-Sawyer-gets-others-to-paint-the-fence like.

I have encountered personalities that think being an encyclopedia of facts means they're right all the time but I really haven't ever seen them amount to anything but ostracized. So, in many ways because of my regard for you, I am trying to keep you the very pleasant, enjoyable person that you are.


Thanks for the thoughtful response, and also for your kind words. If it puts you at ease, I'm not under the false impression that I can become an authority, all I want is to have more familiarity. I'm the first to acknowledge that I am just at the beginning of the rise of a very steep learning curve.

Also, my question about resources and reference materials was not intended to be specifically about gun checks or estate tweeds, but about fabrics and patterns generally. It's frustrating for me to see something I like and not know the proper terminology for it, or to hear something described here (or IRL) and not be able to visualize it. I probably should have posted my question in another thread since it only partially relates to the topic of this thread. I couldn't resist the temptation since this thread is populated by folks who have vast knowledge on the subject.

Thanks again to everyone for their responses. If anyone else has any suggested reading on fabrics and fabric patterns, feel free to pm me if you feel it's better not to muck up this nice gun check thread.
 

voxsartoria

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Originally Posted by TC (Houston)
I probably should have posted my question in another thread since it only partially relates to the topic of this thread.

No, I think that you used this forum correctly.


- B
 

bigbris1

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TC, I had a similar question which was answered with vox' 'just call them checks' earlier on.

This thread brought to mind this coat which I'm on the fence about purchasing:


 

Parker

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Originally Posted by oshinex
How big is the lapels on this jacket?
About 3.5"
Originally Posted by sammy
What book and swatch number is this one from?

That's from the John Hardy Alsport I think.
Originally Posted by voxsartoria
No, I think that you used this forum correctly.
Yes, this is a free-for-all, Wild West kind of thread. No questions turned away. However, gentlemanliness encouraged.
Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger
Asked in WAYWT but figured could pose it here...would this qualify?
I believe you'd just call that a houndstooth, but it has a similar simple check pattern to a gun club. I don't know really what technically makes a gun club, but I think it's a simple grid pattern with monospaced "lines' of alternating colors. The "lines" would be straight and have no "teeth". Like a gingham shirt. Traditionally brown and red, and sometimes with an overcheck. But, I could be wrong.
 

NewYorkIslander

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Originally Posted by Parker


I believe you'd just call that a houndstooth, but it has a similar simple check pattern to a gun club. I don't know really what technically makes a gun club, but I think it's a simple grid pattern with monospaced "lines' of alternating colors. The "lines" would be straight and have no "teeth". Like a gingham shirt. Traditionally brown and red, and sometimes with an overcheck. But, I could be wrong.


What I figured...so it would need an overcheck on top of the houndstooth...
 

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