Gun Appreciation Thread

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by tiecollector, Aug 10, 2007.

  1. cahlersmeyer

    cahlersmeyer Senior member

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    that had to have been a mess. the coyotes I have seen aren't all that big

    it wasn't too bad, hydra-shoks break up on impact for the most part. I didn't want to examine it further b/c if it had the balls to approach me it must have been rabid, coyotes are pretty timid by nature.

    And for size, here in East Central Indiana we have coy-dog hybrids something awful. They have the natural instincts of a wild animal but don't fear man, like a dog. He was about the size of a large German Sheppard.
     
  2. JustinW

    JustinW Senior member

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    I broke that habit once I left the Corps and the M-16(which needed a good cleaning).

    You are probably right about cleaning, but it's a habit I simply can't break.

    I'm more interested in wiping off body salts, and checking for lent or foreign objects in unsuspecting crevices.[​IMG]

    Roman Catholic guilt about an impure weapon? [​IMG]

    I do this with my carry piece at the end of each day when I put it into the bedside safe.
     
  3. milosz

    milosz Senior member

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    There was a long argument on a 1911 forum about cleaning. Most people fell in the middle, but there were quite a few guys who cleaned their guns even when they hadn't been shot - it was a reason to fondle them, 'the more time spent handling my guns the better,' etc..

    That was a bit much for me, but the Internet in general is not the best advertising for gun culture.
     
  4. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    it wasn't too bad, hydra-shoks break up on impact for the most part. I didn't want to examine it further b/c if it had the balls to approach me it must have been rabid, coyotes are pretty timid by nature.

    And for size, here in East Central Indiana we have coy-dog hybrids something awful. They have the natural instincts of a wild animal but don't fear man, like a dog. He was about the size of a large German Sheppard.


    f*ck me, it's stories like this that make me worry about running in the country at all.. I mean, sure, the odds are very, very low, but that poor bastard you read about in the newspaper who was mauled by rabid packs of vicious coyote-dog hybrids must have thought the same thing.. [​IMG]


    There was a long argument on a 1911 forum about cleaning. Most people fell in the middle, but there were quite a few guys who cleaned their guns even when they hadn't been shot - it was a reason to fondle them, 'the more time spent handling my guns the better,' etc..

    That was a bit much for me, but the Internet in general is not the best advertising for gun culture.


    OK, now I am definitely not that OCD, although most manuals that come with firearms state that the gun must be cleaned after each use or at least once a month, so there must be something to that, unless of course, gun manufacturers have diversified and tend to own manufacturers like Hoppes, in which case it makes total sense.

    On the flip side, I rarely polish my shoes, usually only getting it done when I am in an airport and happen to be wearing shoes that need a polish. Go figure.
     
  5. JustinW

    JustinW Senior member

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    OK, now I am definitely not that OCD, although most manuals that come with firearms state that the gun must be cleaned after each use or at least once a month, so there must be something to that, unless of course, gun manufacturers have diversified and tend to own manufacturers like Hoppes, in which case it makes total sense.

    What sort of a clean are you doing monthly?

    I do 3 cleans on any firearm after shooting - until I could pass the RSM's inspection. Then I dust (removing lint, etc.) and wipe down the exterior of any carry pistol before putting it away for the night. Finally, the long arms that live in the safe I know were put away clean, so they just get a visual surface inspection every few months to make sure no rust had crept in or anything nasty. I guess that is my 'fondle' time.
     
  6. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    What sort of a clean are you doing monthly?

    I do 3 cleans on any firearm after shooting - until I could pass the RSM's inspection. Then I dust (removing lint, etc.) and wipe down the exterior of any carry pistol before putting it away for the night. Finally, the long arms that live in the safe I know were put away clean, so they just get a visual surface inspection every few months to make sure no rust had crept in or anything nasty. I guess that is my 'fondle' time.


    I actually don't clean monthly at all. In fact, I have a few semi-automatic pistols that I don't tend to take with me to the range that have not been cleaned in almost 2 years. Was only referring to the "manufacturer's suggested cleaning regimen" in the manuals that come with most handguns. I only clean after a trip to the range, which includes swabbing out the bore with Hoppe's, and a general cleaning of the really dirty parts of the mechanisms. I then use one of those Rem-Oil wipes to wipe them down. Takes me about 5 minutes, tops..
     
  7. JustinW

    JustinW Senior member

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  8. milosz

    milosz Senior member

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    OK, now I am definitely not that OCD, although most manuals that come with firearms state that the gun must be cleaned after each use or at least once a month, so there must be something to that, unless of course, gun manufacturers have diversified and tend to own manufacturers like Hoppes, in which case it makes total sense.

    I've seen the clean after use - but that's basic CYA. I've seen gun manuals that recommended against field-stripping the thing yourself.

    In terms of a modern plastic pistol - Glock/M&P/H&K/etc., we're talking about a polymer frame, a stainless steel barrel, and a slide finished in some kind of Melonite/Tenifer process. Polymer frame obviously isn't going to be effected by spent powder or weather. For the barrel, the only possible positive to cleaning is that the chamber could get gunky and affect feeding, but that's hard to imagine. The slide has one of the most durable metal finishes known. The moving parts on the gun generally don't have tolerances that are going to make cleaning an issue. Over tens of thousands of rounds, maybe - but there's no way you're building up enough gunk (even assuming everyday carry outside of, say, Iraq) to make cleaning absolutely necessary.

    I say plastic pistol because they're generally the simplest in number of parts, but it's also true of Sigs/CZs/Berettas.

    Over the last couple of years, a trainer named Todd Green (pistol-training.com) has shot 50k rounds with an M&P, almost 100k rounds with a P30 and now he's working on a HK45. They were his class and carry guns and got detail-stripped cleanings every 15k rounds or so. That was it, aside from occasional lube. In the end, both the M&P and P30 had failures (slide crack, frame break respectively, I believe) but nothing that cleaning would have prevented.
     
  9. cahlersmeyer

    cahlersmeyer Senior member

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    Just a preview of what my father and I are going to be shooting tomorrow after noon. Its a .45-70 Marlin lever action rifle, will post pics tm from the range. For those unfamiliar with the calibre, its capable of putting down any large game in north america. The only thing it can't drop it things like elephants and rhinos. (For comparison: from left to right, .380 FMJ, .357 semi wad cutter, .45-70 with Polymer Tip, .243 JHP and finally a 5.56(.223)mm JHP with steel case) [​IMG]
     
  10. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    I will say that the 45-70 is a heck of a thumper out of a lever. The only worse way to shoot it is out of a T/C Contender.

    .45-90 and .45-110 are fun, too, but on heavier rifles than the lever.

    ~ H
     
  11. JustinW

    JustinW Senior member

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    CDNN had MSAR AUG clones again for under $1K over the weekend. If I ever get one I'd try to get it close to the F88 Austeyr, but if you went for the flat top, this would be a perfect affordable combat scope:

    http://www.snapsling.com/combatriflescope.php
     
  12. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Are those available now? I bought a Millett 1-4x because those weren't available at the time. I think the guy was having trouble getting distribution sorted or something.
     
  13. Ace Rimmer

    Ace Rimmer Senior member

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    CDNN had MSAR AUG clones again for under $1K over the weekend. If I ever get one I'd try to get it close to the F88 Austeyr, but if you went for the flat top, this would be a perfect affordable combat scope:

    http://www.snapsling.com/combatriflescope.php


    Yeah, what is up with CDNN? They left me a voicemail on Saturday to tell me about the STG556s they had in stock. Are times so tough that they have to resort to telemarketing?
     
  14. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    So I had to buy the Beretta PX4 chambered in 9 mm, subcompact. Great little pistol, and feels great in the hand. Made in Maryland though, about the only Beretta I own that was not made in Italy. As an esteemed member of Style Forvm, I am not sure how I should feel about that.. [​IMG]

    I have noticed though that the trigger pulls on my PX4 .40 cal and this one now, are both a bit spongey, which takes some getting used to..
     
  15. Southern-Nupe

    Southern-Nupe Senior member

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    So I had to buy the Beretta PX4 chambered in 9 mm, subcompact. Great little pistol, and feels great in the hand. Made in Maryland though, about the only Beretta I own that was not made in Italy. As an esteemed member of Style Forvm, I am not sure how I should feel about that.. [​IMG]

    I have noticed though that the trigger pulls on my PX4 .40 cal and this one now, are both a bit spongey, which takes some getting used to..


    I found the DA to be somewhat too long, but the SA is crisp wih good feedback. There's absolutely nothing wrong with buying a U.S. made firearm, in fact guns manufactured in this country tend to hold a high value amongst the gun-loving crowd...take for instance most sought after 1911's and revolvers.
     

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