Grilling Steak

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mrpologuy, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Nice view.
    Thanks. Just moved, I'm enjoying it.
     
  2. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    Here's today's effort (better than last time IMO) using j's method (more or less):

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    Thanks. Just moved, I'm enjoying it.

    Hey, congrats!! I wish you peace and joy there.

    (and good steak)

    Regards,
    Huntsman
     
  4. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Lunch today:

    [​IMG]

    NY Strip (a bit overdone, but still good) and some random mushrooms which I messed up a little...

    How do you grill mushrooms? I brushed them with olive oil and put them on the upper rack for most of the time the steak was on, and they are just a bit leathery.

    BTW, I have switched to Kosher salt for the steak and it works much better IMO than plain table salt or sea salt.
     
  5. sho'nuff

    sho'nuff grrrrrrrr!!

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    Here's today's effort (better than last time IMO) using j's method (more or less):

    [​IMG]


    mmm. that is good eatin.
     
  6. spertia

    spertia Senior member

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    BTW, I have switched to Kosher salt for the steak and it works much better IMO than plain table salt or sea salt.

    I recently made the same switch (from sea salt) and it definitely is a world of difference.
     
  7. migo

    migo Senior member

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    so I JUST grilled a steak, smells normal, sauces taste good and everything...take a bite, F#$KING BEEF HAS GONE BAD!!! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Now, with nothing else to eat, and with no motivation to make/buy anything, I'm left with fruit loops.
     
  8. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    so I JUST grilled a steak, smells normal, sauces taste good and everything...take a bite, F#$KING BEEF HAS GONE BAD!!! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Now, with nothing else to eat, and with no motivation to make/buy anything, I'm left with fruit loops.


    That sucks man. Nothing like waiting to taste a juicy steak and ending up hungry.
     
  9. Sartorian

    Sartorian Senior member

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    Lunch today: [​IMG] NY Strip (a bit overdone, but still good) and some random mushrooms which I messed up a little... How do you grill mushrooms? I brushed them with olive oil and put them on the upper rack for most of the time the steak was on, and they are just a bit leathery.
    Looks tasty. For mushrooms, olive oil, garlic, salt and tarragon work well. You pretty much should only cook them as long as they sweat (the steam rising off them.) They really don't need to cook long.
    BTW, I have switched to Kosher salt for the steak and it works much better IMO than plain table salt or sea salt.
    Kosher salt is very porous, so it soaks into the meat is it cooks, and it can be used in greater amounts without creating too salty a flavor. One trick you steak lovers might try is to brown your steaks on a sauce pan with peanut oil, low-medium heat, on each side, before putting on the grill. A few minutes on each side and on end is fine. This seals the surface of the steak and keeps the meat moist and juicy.
     
  10. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Senior member

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    I no longer order steak in restaurants (unless I'm stuck in a high end steak joint) because my own steaks are far superior. Here's what I do:

    - Bone in ribeye with no growth hormone, typically from Whole Foods

    Marinate for 3-4 hours in a manly concoction of the following:

    - Lea & Perrins worcestershire sauce
    - Extra virgin olive oil
    - Jim Beam boubon
    - Pressed fresh garlic
    - Fresh ground pepper
    - Soy sauce

    Fire up the grill to max temperature.

    When the steak has marinated sufficiently, toss it on the grill. Sear a side for a little under two minutes.

    Make sure the steak is room temperature when it first goes on the grill!

    Dump some remaining marinade on the steak (be prepared for alcohol explosion) and then turn the steak over. If you're using a gas grill, which I do becuase I grill all the time and can't be bothered with charcoal, turn the middle burner to low and the outside burners to medium. Proceed to cook the remainer of the steak over the middle burner until done to taste. If you have a good grill you can time it exactly for consistency every time.

    Let the steak sit a couple minutes before eating, which optimizes the juiciness.

    Now for the steak sauce. Some may consider steak sauce bush league, but a good steak sauce can add a lot of flavor IMHO when used properly. Most steakhouses seem to agree with me.

    Steak sauce is really easy to make. Simply mix:

    - Finely chopped white onion
    - Heinz ketchup
    - Lea & Perrins worcestershire sauce (the key ingredient)
    - A splash of tobasco sauce

    The result is something like Heinz 57 sauce but fresher and with a kick.

    Serve this to friends and they will bow down before your grilling mightiness, I guarantee it.
     
  11. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Interesting, I'll have to try your ideas sometime. Normally I'm just too lazy to do marinades and such, and I am very bad at planning ahead for food unless it's a scheduled thing like a barbecue with friends.

    Question on the steaks I have right now - the one pictured above had a pretty big strip of fat along the side, so I sliced through it every couple of inches to prevent it curling up. This worked, but is it better to just trim it off completely? I don't usually eat the fat anyway. I left it on there because I figured it would add flavor as it cooked. What's the best way to handle this?

    Also, has anyone ever tried a larding needle or similar techniques for really lean steaks? I've been curious to see how that would work. And any good stuffed steak recipes? I've had some very good garlic- or bleu-cheese-stuffed sirloins, for example.
     
  12. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Senior member

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    Normally I'm just too lazy to do marinades and such, and I am very bad at planning ahead for food unless it's a scheduled thing like a barbecue with friends.

    The easiest way to do marinades is to mix them with the steak in a ziplock bag. Zero cleanup that way.... Cleaning up is what I loathe about cooking.
     
  13. saint

    saint Senior member

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    Lunch today:

    [​IMG]

    NY Strip (a bit overdone, but still good) and some random mushrooms which I messed up a little...

    How do you grill mushrooms? I brushed them with olive oil and put them on the upper rack for most of the time the steak was on, and they are just a bit leathery.

    BTW, I have switched to Kosher salt for the steak and it works much better IMO than plain table salt or sea salt.


    Even better is Maldon Sea salt or sel gris (Trader Joe's sells sel gris), they are coarse like kosher salt, but have more flavor.
     
  14. spertia

    spertia Senior member

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    Question on the steaks I have right now - the one pictured above had a pretty big strip of fat along the side, so I sliced through it every couple of inches to prevent it curling up. This worked, but is it better to just trim it off completely? I don't usually eat the fat anyway. I left it on there because I figured it would add flavor as it cooked. What's the best way to handle this?

    I just leave the fat on there for flavor but don't actually eat it. I wouldn't suggest trimming it off in advance of grilling.
     
  15. east hastings

    east hastings Active Member

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    my absolute favorite way to cook a steak is to brush it with olive oil, sea salt and fresh cracked pepper. it's really delicious, and really simple to make. if your pockets are feeling rather deep, a good addition is morels sauteed in butter with some chives, and use that as a side or to top the steak.
     

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