Grey trousers = security guard?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by thenitwit, Aug 30, 2014.

  1. thenitwit

    thenitwit Well-Known Member

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    Saw a few posts here that suggest a navy blazer with grey pants look security guard like.

    Can anyone shed some light on this and if so, what would be better colour odd trousers to have made? Two colours.

    Thanks for any feedback in advance
     
  2. thenitwit

    thenitwit Well-Known Member

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    @GBR: could you offer some advice as I know you're in the UK like myself so could perhaps guide me on our trends. I was thinking light grey and mid grey, nothing too dark to create as much contrast as possible.

    I already have chinos so want to avoid these sorts of colours as I want to reserve these for my casual fits. But maybe you can suggest a better pair of colours for maximum versatility and so forth.

    Regards
     
  3. Count de Monet

    Count de Monet Senior member

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    There no better colors for versatility than solid navy for a sport coats (odd jacket) and light-medium gray for pants. Surely most of the SF "security guard" remarks are tongue in check.

    You are on the right path.
     
  4. blackadder

    blackadder Well-Known Member

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    I've never seen a security guard wearing a navy blazer.

    Black or dark grey trousers and a plain shirt with no jacket may look like a security guard.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2014
  5. jt10000

    jt10000 Senior member

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    The security guard impression is most likely the more of these it hits: quality of the clothes is poor, the fit is long or baggy, the shoes clunky, the shirt is a medium or french blue solid color, or the person wearing them (in the US at least) is black. I'm black BTW.

    If you're doing it with well-tailored clothes, an interesting patterned shirt (or a pink shirt perhaps), and/or a nice tie and nice shoes, it's less likely to look that way. In other words, if you dress well, that combo is fine and versatile.
     
  6. tchoy

    tchoy Senior member

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  7. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    I'm afraid that 'well dressed' public facing security staff do wear grey trousers/blue blazers - not door keepers at pubs who are draped in black. It is one of those sad things that a reasonable form of dress ahs become synonymous with such people.

    That said if one were to go to a Saturday lunchtime business function - quite common in the UK and usually at a sports event you will see that costume.

    I would suggest that you get a charcoal pair of trousers - NOT lighter grey and a blue blazer closer to midnight which fit extremely well and you will be OK. A double breasted blue blazer would be even better. The key is that it fits properly.

    Take care that a badly fitting double breasted blazer would be reminiscent of an elderly soldier of moderate former rank attending some memorial gathering.

    Presentation is all.
     
  8. thenitwit

    thenitwit Well-Known Member

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    I see.

    With all due respect, if they are a well dressed security staff, then surely an equally well dressed security guard in a suit could pass as a lawyer or a businessman of moderate status?
    I don't mean to be rude or what not. I'm not exactly a high flying lawyer and not so fussed as coming across as looking like a well dressed security guard. A bouncer and perhaps, I'd be worried.

    I've come across some men working in real estate agents who were wearing very, very nice suits and shoes and out of place given the job. Is this a case of overthinking the security guard look? If it's avoidable, then I'll just do that rather than even have to worry about it, I guess.

    I'm under 25, and don't think I'd ever get mistaken for a security guard but would rather avoid the look.

    I already have a navy blazer which I had made so I'm not really looking to pick up another for the amount of wear it gets.

    Do you think there are any colours that can work with the jacket?

    Thank you,
     
  9. thenitwit

    thenitwit Well-Known Member

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    I presume by cottons, we mean chinos but ones cut like trousers? I already have some chinos (casual) and often pair them so wanted a pair of trousers that were different. Flannels sound like a good idea, but are they all year round?
     
  10. mouseandcat

    mouseandcat Senior member

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    yea, i seem to be considering this same situation. i have light grey wool flannel pants and want to pair it with a odd jacket since i only have suits. i like the look of the patterns jackets, but only with the particular grey pants. not sure i'd wear plaid jackets otherwise.
     
  11. tchoy

    tchoy Senior member

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    By cotton I don't mean the casual chino variety there are dressier cotton trousers if you can find it or you can have them made. Flannel trousers are the most versatile to wear with navy blazers, there are various weight of flannel you can choose even summer flannels. I'll would use flannel for 3 seasons and wear cotton or Fresco for summer.
     
  12. thenitwit

    thenitwit Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a plan. What weight would you reccomend or can you send me a link of what you mean so I have an idea?

    Thanks in advance
     
  13. tchoy

    tchoy Senior member

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    Flannels
    I didn't ask if you were looking for RTW or having trousers make by a tailor.

    The cloth samples are only useful you were having trousers made.

    Flannels

    http://www.themerchantfox.co.uk/prod/142/flannel/fox-flannel-mid-grey-fox-flannel

    http://www.themerchantfox.co.uk/prod/150/flannel/fox-flannel-classic-grey-chalk-stripe
    Cottons

    https://www.facebook.com/MerinoBrot...597891792118/1477764045775502/?type=3&theater
    https://www.facebook.com/MerinoBrot...597891792118/1477763875775519/?type=3&theater
     
  14. thenitwit

    thenitwit Well-Known Member

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    I'm having them made but thought it would be good to have an idea of what I'm looking for.

    [​IMG]

    This is a fox flannel he offers. Not sure about weight though.

    What sort of OZ am I after for 3 seasons?

    Thanks for the fabrics, helps me get an idea!
     
  15. Balfour

    Balfour Senior member

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    I agree with what has been said above about good fit, good quality, etc.

    The security guard quips always amuse me. I actually rarely see security guards wearing blazer and greys in the UK. Usually 'smart' security guards are dressed in poorly fitting suits (mid-light grey in both the places I most recently visited).

    You mentioned you were looking for a UK perspective. I would add that the blazer has traditionally been worn in very specific social / sporting contexts in the UK. Unlike in the US, it is seen much less commonly in the workplace.

    Indeed, odd jackets are much less common in the workplace (at least in major cities). Business formal to business casual often involves moving from full suit to full suit without tie to ditching the jacket altogether. When you do see odd jackets in business contexts, it tends to be much more of an edgy, fashion-forward look, rather than classically styled blazers, tweeds or faux tweeds, etc. I think this is a shame, as a tailored jacket is a very practical garment in many ways.

    The blue odd jacket is much more common in Italy. Swap brass buttons for brown horn and you are consciously stepping away from the non-business associations blazers have in the UK.
     

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