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Hi Wyatt,

Your dedication to craftsmanship and the emphasis on quality materials truly resonates with the shoe enthusiasts here. It's impressive to hear about the meticulous process behind the shoes, especially the collaboration with renowned tanneries worldwide.
 

Genericuser1

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IMG_7424.jpg
IMG_7422.jpg
 

lfzhao5

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Anyone have a pair of EEE and a D that fits them well?

Ie 10D vs 9EEE. I'm curious how they compare.

I had E and D width before and E looks significantly bulkier
 

MrOxford

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Hey gents... I want your opinion on a very practical subject related to Grant Stone dainite/studded sole.
A year ago I gifted a pair of dune Diesels to my daughter. She really liked them and that is a great news (having fairly wide toes - just like her dad - makes fit often difficult for her). The natural consequence is that those boots got some good mileage this year. Probably more than most of us put on the boots when we have rotation of a dozen... or more LOL. Recently I 'borrowed' them for conditioning and had a chance to look them over. Overall 'dainite' sole is holding up really well and there is barely any wear on most of it... except front and back 1/2". I guess she (like most humans?) has a fairly rocking gait.
Now, after that preamble, couple question:

1. Construction/cobbler question - there are TWO layers of rubber on the bottom of the heel. Is it only top layer of rubber that is a 'toplift' usually replaced by cobblers or both layers of rubber are a 'toplift' and are replaced together anyway? I have seen that different makers have different approaches to that (sometimes having first layer of rubber nailed, and second layer of rubber glued on top), wonder how Grant Stone 'dainite' heel is actually made. Same question simplified - is it still OK to keep wearing those when first layer of rubber is getting worn through or should I run to the cobbler for new toplifts right away?
2. How bad is that toe wear? As I understand even wearing a bit into leather midsole should be OK since it is going to be replaced when resoling anyway, right? (as long as welt is still OK).
3. What the heck is one to do when rubber soles are pretty much perfect but their toes sections are wearing too quickly? At least toplifts are straightforward - replace when worn, but it kinda stinks to replace whole sole when only front 1/2" is worn out. While metal toe plates are fairly common on leather soles... I do not think that is quite the case with rubber soles.

Obviously, first question is pretty tricky, I hope somebody knows the answer. The other two are pretty subjective.
Let your daughter wear the boots for another six months. Afterward, get the cobbler to slap on new house leather outsoles with rubber sole guards and new rubber heels. If this pair of boots is your daughter's daily wear boots, she has received good mileage. Typically, the heels will wear out first. You have the option just replacing the toplift only. After one year of the new toplift only, both the toplift and outsoles will need to be replaced together. This is a personal judgment call on whether to only replace the heels now or get the full rebuilt service (new leather outsoles, sole guards, and new heel). It boils down to your budget. Personally, I would just replace the heel only and revisit the decision to replace the outsole a year later. Your daughter preference in footwear may change, so just do the new toplift for now.
 

woodenbits

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Let your daughter wear the boots for another six months.
Thank you for the advice! Actually, my memory failed me when I was writing that post - she had those boots for only 6 months, not a full year. So, yes, she got some serious mileage on them in those 6 months. Her rough estimate was close to 1 million steps, which translates to about 300-400 miles. After some agonizing, I ended up going DIY route for now, and applied small pieces of 2mm toplift rubber to toes and heel area like one would apply plastic toe/heel taps, but those were rubber 'half-moon' pieces cut to the outside profile of the sole and glued with barge cement, so no clicking noise, no scratches on hardwood floor, no extra slippage, and it also ended up looking much better than I expected. Time will show how that holds up. No self-respecting cobbler would do it, because it is pretty labor/time intensive for the limited benefit to the customer, but for me, that was a fun project. And it will buy us more time to decide what the next sole should be - given that rain and snow are frequent guests here in PA, I am partial to the idea of a ridgeway sole. Or Vibram Tygum V-bar sole.
Sadly, I gave boots back without snapping photos of the finished DIY project, so going to post just a photo of a post-conditioning patina on them. That Dune CXL is indeed a patina monster leather.
 

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Erikdayo

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Thank you for the advice! Actually, my memory failed me when I was writing that post - she had those boots for only 6 months, not a full year. So, yes, she got some serious mileage on them in those 6 months. Her rough estimate was close to 1 million steps, which translates to about 300-400 miles. After some agonizing, I ended up going DIY route for now, and applied small pieces of 2mm toplift rubber to toes and heel area like one would apply plastic toe/heel taps, but those were rubber 'half-moon' pieces cut to the outside profile of the sole and glued with barge cement, so no clicking noise, no scratches on hardwood floor, no extra slippage, and it also ended up looking much better than I expected. Time will show how that holds up. No self-respecting cobbler would do it, because it is pretty labor/time intensive for the limited benefit to the customer, but for me, that was a fun project. And it will buy us more time to decide what the next sole should be - given that rain and snow are frequent guests here in PA, I am partial to the idea of a ridgeway sole. Or Vibram Tygum V-bar sole.
Sadly, I gave boots back without snapping photos of the finished DIY project, so going to post just a photo of a post-conditioning patina on them. That Dune CXL is indeed a patina monster leather.
This pair looks great. If your daughter is that into these boots I would definitely recommend adding another pair or two sooner than later. I know many people here have a dozen pairs or more, but having 2 or 3 to rotate or better coordinate with certain outfits can go a long way for longevity
 

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