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GQ Business Casual Article

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by althanis, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. ljrcustom

    ljrcustom Senior member

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    not a bad article. Thanks for sharing.

    -LR
     
  2. mkarim

    mkarim Senior member

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    Nearly every guy I've ever worked with believes that the only item worth tailoring is a rented tux. They wear everything else right off the rack and assume that it automatically makes them look good because it's "dressy" clothing.

    +100.

    Not only that, but they look at you strange if you do tailor something.
     
  3. chrisb0109

    chrisb0109 Senior member

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    For the sake of posterity...
    the GQ article linked here is an ok guidline but nothing more than entry level information.
    Where GQ repeatedly fails, is by not paying attention to different body frames and types; a massive over-sight on their part. I suspect the young staff at GQ haven't a clue of what real style is.
    Rake thin with good bone structure and symmetry, make up only a small minority of men.
    Therefore, the challenge for GQ (or any other magazine) would be to show how any man can up his look. regardless of his frame, looks or wallet.
    The manufacturers that advertise in GQ should be pissed to see their product mis-represented over and over and over again. Fashion, style, clothes are for everyone and not just impossibly skinny young men in their 20's with nowhere to go in their new clothes anyway.
    A typical young man in his 20's, trying to reach these impossible prices will look great,
    sitting at home watching TV because now he's broke.
    Whoever is behind these crappy issues of GQ should be fired.
    The only thing in the October 2010 issue worth reading is the Goodfellas article.
    I rate this article [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]



    I hear this over and over again on here. You guys have got to realize that the fashion industry doesn't care about the average man or woman.

    Most young men and women may not have the means to buy the clothing represented in these magazines, but i would wager that a significant portion of these fashion brand's sales come from the small group of young, thin, modelesque people who can afford them.

    While the average middle aged man or woman is more likely to be able to afford these clothes, they aren't interested in buying them. These magazines and advertisers aren't just bullshitting. There is a reason that ads are aimed at a certain group of people. It is making them money.
     
  4. junior varsity

    junior varsity Senior member

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    I hear this over and over again on here. You guys have got to realize that the fashion industry doesn't care about the average man or woman.

    Most young men and women may not have the means to buy the clothing represented in these magazines, but i would wager that a significant portion of these fashion brand's sales come from the small group of young, thin, modelesque people who can afford them.

    While the average middle aged man or woman is more likely to be able to afford these clothes, they aren't interested in buying them. These magazines and advertisers aren't just bullshitting. There is a reason that ads are aimed at a certain group of people. It is making them money.


    agreed.
    whens the last time fashion people cared about people with a gut?
    i think the proper answer from a fashion person is "gtfo, go lose some fucking weight!" (which i think is very correct - yes go lose some fucking weight!)

    look at womens fashion for example.. how many girls have the body of a megan fox? not many! but why they still make, design and advertise clothes specifically for girls with that kind of body?
     
  5. porcelain monkey

    porcelain monkey Senior member

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    I do like that GQ focuses on fit. Granted, most of their looks I find a bit too shrunken - short jackets, high water pants - but I think it is better then the opposite - tentish jackets and shirts, pants puddling at the ankles. As for the designer brands that they show, they do what they have to do. The magazine is a business and they showcase particular brands to please advertisers. However, fashion being what it is, a non-copyrightable marketplace, all those expensive looks are generally to be had at much lesser prices if you look around enough.
     
  6. bleachboy

    bleachboy Senior member

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    do people really spend $278 on dress shoes with rubber soles? and a 'hefty' rubber sole at that. lol...

    All the time. I personally own two pairs of $500+ shoes with Dainite (rubber) soles.
     
  7. bringusingoodale

    bringusingoodale Senior member

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    I am a slim guy, but even I think those pantsand tight cardigans border the too slim for seriousness look. I am always on the look out for slim fitting pants across the thighs and with a hem of 7 7/8 or 8, not anything less. For sweaters, I just size up if possible and doable.
     
  8. Jsoftz

    Jsoftz Senior member

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    That first picture is a bit ridiculous. True, far too many people wear clothes that are too large for them and billow excess fabric, but few people would wear that and not know those articles are far too large on them.
    I dunno man. That guy could be in any office I've ever worked in- Brooks Brothers shirts, pleated poly blend trousers the wife bought from Kohl's, shitty square toed rubber soled shoes he got from DSW.. I see it every day. Despite what the article says, wearing a blazer to work in an office like mine (in Austin, Texas) is just impractical. One, 70% of the year it's just too hot, and two, everyone is wearing t-shirts and jeans. The odd day that you actually wear wool trousers, people comment on it and jokingly ask if you have an interview or something. Admittedly, the last time I wore wool trousers at my office.. it was only because a director was visiting. There used to be a guy who regularly wore blazers to the office, and everyone just thought he was a douche. True, he also wore "guy-liner," a spray-on tan, and was a shameless brand-whore, but still.
     
  9. Metlin

    Metlin Senior member

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    lol @ this do people really spend $278 on dress shoes with rubber soles? and a 'hefty' rubber sole at that. lol...
    Yes. And more, in fact. I've even had custom made shoes with rubber soles in styles that I've liked (and someone mentioned Dainite here). I've Plantar fasciitis and anything other than rubber soles are a nightmare. I'm also on my feet a lot and traveling most of the time. I wish more shoes came with a rubber sole option -- aesthetic over comfort seems to be the mantra today, unfortunately.
     
  10. suited

    suited Senior member

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    "A tailored jacket gives your torso some much needed shape"

    Right, assuming it's not on a guy that weighs 135lbs. That model's torso has about as much shape as an olson twin. Considering what the article was trying to accomplish, it was awful.
     
  11. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Given that magazines are geared to the general public I think it does a decent job. If you're already on the cutting edge you obviously dont need tips from GQ.

    Think of where these mags end up? Last time i flipped through GQ it was on the stand at my Barber shop.

    They always go more extreme in the pictures because they want to highlight what actually changed, if the average guy is thinking that the fashionable guys are going no-break on their pants then he will move to a light break on the next pair.
     
  12. landshark

    landshark Senior member

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    I think it's funny how they say no to square toed shoes (which I agree with). Weren't they telling everyone to buy them earlier this year?
     
  13. nycstylist

    nycstylist Member

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    Really great interesting article!
     
  14. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    I hear this over and over again on here. You guys have got to realize that the fashion industry doesn't care about the average man or woman.

    Most young men and women may not have the means to buy the clothing represented in these magazines, but i would wager that a significant portion of these fashion brand's sales come from the small group of young, thin, modelesque people who can afford them.

    While the average middle aged man or woman is more likely to be able to afford these clothes, they aren't interested in buying them. These magazines and advertisers aren't just bullshitting. There is a reason that ads are aimed at a certain group of people. It is making them money.


    Agreed, but they would make much more money by inviting a lot more people to the party, so to speak. GQ (Details, etc) are still very useful magazines to newcomers.
     
  15. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    The fashion mags are who invite newcomers to the party. If you dont know the first thing about menswear you still know what GQ is.
     
  16. amplifiedheat

    amplifiedheat Senior member

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    Are some of those pants too tight? I personally think it's all well fitted stuff that I'd really like my wardrobe to eventually look like, but you guys have an expert eye.

    Remember: thesis, antithesis, synthesis. GQ does exclusively antithesis. Their pants reliably show pulling at the crotch even when the model is standing still. (GQ is also staffed by eunuchs, so they don't favor pleats.)
     
  17. chrisb0109

    chrisb0109 Senior member

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    Agreed, but they would make much more money by inviting a lot more people to the party, so to speak. GQ (Details, etc) are still very useful magazines to newcomers.

    I imagine their market research team would disagree. These people aren't just making it up as they go.

    Moreover, I think the average person fails to realize that on an aesthetic level, the fashion industry is not only not concerned with them, but dead-set not to accommodate them. Its simple, people with a body shape don't make a good foundation for clothing.

    I think you need to be in the industry to get it to some extent. Fashion designers, photographers, etc are artists. They have an aesthetic in mind and don't wish to accomodate people outside of that aesthetic. Thats just how the game works. Of course money is a driving factor, but if they can make enough without letting "normal" people wear their clothes, why give in?
     
  18. donCarlos

    donCarlos Well-Known Member

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    ...

    I wish more shoes came with a rubber sole option -- aesthetic over comfort seems to be the mantra today, unfortunately.

    I wish!

    As for the article, I think that rubber soles can be practical (for worse weather, intense use etc.).
    I don´t share their hate for pleated pants. Some of my pants have single pleats, some of them have no pleats, I don´t think it really matters for my body type. Double-pleating is a no-no though, I agree with that.
    Other than that, this article can surely give some valuable basic inspiration for beginners.
     
  19. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    I imagine their market research team would disagree. These people aren't just making it up as they go.

    Moreover, I think the average person fails to realize that on an aesthetic level, the fashion industry is not only not concerned with them, but dead-set not to accommodate them. Its simple, people with a body shape don't make a good foundation for clothing.

    I think you need to be in the industry to get it to some extent. Fashion designers, photographers, etc are artists. They have an aesthetic in mind and don't wish to accomodate people outside of that aesthetic. Thats just how the game works. Of course money is a driving factor, but if they can make enough without letting "normal" people wear their clothes, why give in?


    That was the answer I was looking for. Well stated.
     
  20. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    The fashion mags are who invite newcomers to the party. If you dont know the first thing about menswear you still know what GQ is.
    With respect, I both agree and disagree. It is true what you say. However, the fashion mags are leaning to inviting wealthier newcomers to the party, or wanna-be's who will spend every dime they have to gain social acceptance. The price tag 'weeds out the riff-raff' to use an olde phrase. I feel that most men don't even know they can dress better. It is as though they are out there, all 98% of them, waiting for someone to give them permission. Magazines like GQ are playing it safe with the anorexic mannequin models. People can and do find it very intimidating to see their own demographics left unrepresented. Maybe Rodney Dangerfield was onto something with his 'Regular Guy' look in 'Easy Money'? (Or was it 'Back To School'?) There are also not enough ethnic backgrounds represented. Remember the old Benetton ads? They were a master-stroke that invited the whole world into their stores. Everyone felt welcomed to shop there and explore and wear. We need to see more of this human diversity in GQ, that's all I am saying. I hope you understand my meaning. It is difficult to put into words my frustration on this issue.
     

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