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Good Natured Advice Thread (improving a business wardrobe)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Claghorn, Jan 6, 2014.

  1. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    You are a consignment store waiting to happen.
     
  2. Nikolaus

    Nikolaus Senior member

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  3. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    I just mean that if you buy stuff you never wear it will eventually get sold second hand. [​IMG]
     
  4. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    I recently stored all of my ties on racks and it allowed me a chance to get a good look at them. What I discovered was that with 100+, I have navy foulards utterly on lock-down. More green/brown foulards needed. More solid wools needed, and more summer prints. Other categories are robust. I also found 10 ties needing repair and 10 I want to get rid of or "upgrade."

    I am experiencing burn-out on RTW shoes, but not because I have reached critical mass. Just unsatisfying and way too time-consuming to find anything that fits and is in the configuration I want, so I don't want anymore of those.
     
  5. Nikolaus

    Nikolaus Senior member

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    [​IMG] [​IMG] well, you know, here in the old Europe we're not into the habit of exchanging stuff; it just stays in the wardrobe. Even, if it would be sometimes better to make someone happy and make some space, instead of ordering a new closet.
     
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  6. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    Really? With the massive selection of RTW shoes out there I would think it would be simple to find just about anything. I understand the fit issue though.

    I didn't know that. Come to think of it, I've never run across a vintage or consignment store in Europe. I suppose that doesn't mean they don't exist, but I can think of at least one in every amor city in the U.S. that I've been to.
     
  7. Nikolaus

    Nikolaus Senior member

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    [​IMG]I think I'll learn many new things here; I could not figure out what a "consignment" store could be :)) and I've looked up the word in the dictionary at your first post.

    Well, there are some second hand shops, but more for specific items (military,...).
    In everyday life we use clothes that are washable and rather cheap since mainstream, so I think there is no such point.
     
  8. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Secondhand clothing, along with other strange concepts like restaurant "doggie bags," is not considered dignified in Europe.
    For the same reason, picking up your dog's feces on the street is also considered beneath human beings.

    In America, the pluralist, expansive society, the inverse is true. In fact, I bet there are even secondhand clothing stores for dogs, where the gum-chewing staff will gladly pick up Rover's droppings.
     
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  9. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    You would be surprised -- people also go to used clothing stores to find old T-shirts and jeans from 5 decades ago for nickels on the dollar. If you enjoy the scent of moth balls, wearing a ringer-neck tee that says "I Like Ike" on it and bellbottom jeans might be even more cost-effective than shopping at the local H&M.
     
  10. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    I was using doggie bags in an attempt to explain the notorious American portion size to someone. In the old days if you went to a restaurant and didn't get enough to take some home at the end of the night it wasn't considered a good value. Of course the idea that Americans eat larger portions is mostly a moot point these days anyway since nearly everyone in the Western World eats larger now. My wife and I just had friends from New Zealand visiting the U.S. and they were always saying "I always heard American portions were huge but I'm not seeing it." Well, the whole world eats that way now.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  11. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    It's a huge time sink. I don't have time to try eight zillion makers in different stores all over the planet in hopes of finding something that is not ugly or not painful.

    [​IMG]

    I remember seeing some images of Church's (?) at the turn of the century and they had every configuration of normal shoe in quarter sizes and widths. Go to the shop, get a real shoe, get the fuck out. Now there are nine billion brands, but they all make freakish patinated Frankenstein shoes with questionable configurations and the same bad lasts that are designed with no ergonomics in mind.
     
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  12. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Diets are more plentiful and people are subject to fewer privations now, but I disagree. Just last month I went to a tapas restaurant in a major US city and the portions were gargantuan for a single item. I want to eat many small plates, not have "family style" dishes that weigh more than my cranium. The problem is, no one eats multi-course meals anymore, at least in Anglo-Saxon countries -- it's entrees and dessert. This is the real reason everything is humongous. The traditional Japanese diet advocates "one soup, three sides." When was the last time you had a soup that wasn't an entree in its own right?
     
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  13. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    I'm not saying sizes aren't large in the U.S., I'm just saying that the rest of the west has really caught up to us. In New Zealand you'd eat much the same size portion you would in the U.S. Same for Italy, Greece, Bulgaria, etc. People from those places are rarely surprised by how much we eat anymore, at least from my experience.
     
  14. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Is pasta still a side dish in Italy, or has it become an entree? Honest question -- I don't know.
     
  15. Nikolaus

    Nikolaus Senior member

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    [​IMG]
    One of my favorite ties; for dark shirts.
    just to get an idea what we're dealing with :)) as far as my personal tastes go :D
     
  16. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    That I'm not sure. My wife was in Italy earlier this year and the only thing she reported was that it is nearly impossible to be a vegetarian there.
     
  17. Nikolaus

    Nikolaus Senior member

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    pasta is, and was, the main serving in Italy :)))
    not a huge fan of pasta, personally.

    I think it's the cost/practicability issue here in Europe. In other words, the item must have a certain value attached to it (material value, for collectors, cultural as old books) to justify to offer it to someone else. You can get really nice old books or pick them up for free in the local public library, since it's deemed as appropriate to pass them on.

    Italians use lots of vegetables for cooking.
    Austria and Germany on the other hand,those people cannot cook without meat, that's for sure.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2016
  18. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    This is true of most of the world, except perhaps India and certain Southeast Asian countries. American vegetarianism is indeed a special privilege.
    Expecting the cuisine of other places to adapt to our needs may be a form of exceptionalism. When in Rome...

    Not singling out your wife. She seems like a nice lady.
     
  19. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Eel is in season and I recently went to a restaurant where (quite unexpectedly) live eels were brought out of the tank and skewered, drained, and filleted before my eyes, rather than in the kitchen. (I can assure you that this bit of theater is by no means normal) I sure like eel, but seeing this made me blue in the face. I felt like Upton Sinclair in The Jungle. One thing is the Mediterranean salt-baked fish, brought to the table whole on a cart, the crust cracked, and the fish neatly filleted. That is fine and dandy. But witnessing mortal battle with eels the size of baseball bats is another matter entirely.
     
  20. Caustic Man

    Caustic Man Senior member

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    Well, she wasn't exactly expecting anyone to do anything. Just commenting on the situation. I also don't think vegetarianism is a privilege, necessarily. On the contrary, the massive amount of meat we have available to us today show how privileged modern humans are. In previous eras a great many places ate little meat because of its cost and scarcity, which makes sense because if you are living in an agricultural society most of your cows and other animals are more valuable alive than dead.
     

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