Giving Notice

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by gladhands, May 31, 2011.

  1. gladhands

    gladhands Senior member

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    I will be leaving my position in a couple of months. I would like to give my employer ample time to replace me, but I also know that they're desperately trying to cut salary. I'm afraid that if I give too much notice, they may just ask me to leave, and have one of my subordinates do my job while they search for a cheaper replacement. Advice?
     
  2. greekgeek

    greekgeek Senior member

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    Give two weeks, no more no less.
     
  3. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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    Give whatever you're contractually mandated to give.
     
  4. Jangofett

    Jangofett Senior member

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    I will be leaving my position in a couple of months. I would like to give my employer ample time to replace me, but I also know that they're desperately trying to cut salary. I'm afraid that if I give too much notice, they may just ask me to leave, and have one of my subordinates do my job while they search for a cheaper replacement. Advice?

    Er, you want to give your boss plenty of time but you are afraid they dont need so much of your time?

    Seems like you are thinking for your boss. If they want you to leave even if they are so dumb to do so, I say let them. Honestly, your efforts would not be appreciated. If they think your subordinates or a cheaper guy can do your job, let them be.

    I was in your shoes before. Believe me. Staying in a position like that, leaves you in a state of limbo and its a waste of your time and life and your efforts will not be appreciated and will be forgotten in the end.

    Just serve whatever notice the law allows you and leave. If they want you to stay longer, let them ask you, and do it if you really want to. I know you want to be responsible to the customers and do the right thing for the company and your colleagues but some bosses dont see things the way you do and want to save some dough and screw things up. Hell, let them.
     
  5. gladhands

    gladhands Senior member

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    Er, you want to give your boss plenty of time but you are afraid they dont need so much of your time?

    Seems like you are thinking for your boss. If they want you to leave even if they are so dumb to do so, I say let them. Honestly, your efforts would not be appreciated. If they think your subordinates or a cheaper guy can do your job, let them be.

    I was in your shoes before. Believe me. Staying in a position like that, leaves you in a state of limbo and its a waste of your time and life and your efforts will not be appreciated and will be forgotten in the end.

    Just serve whatever notice the law allows you and leave. If they want you to stay longer, let them ask you, and do it if you really want to. I know you want to be responsible to the customers and do the right thing for the company and your colleagues but some bosses dont see things the way you do and want to save some dough and screw things up. Hell, let them.


    I'm leaving because my wife accepted a position in another city back in December. Due to contractual obligations, she can't leave until July. We have a two-month old, so I won't leave before the entire family can move. The end result being that I've known since December that I'm leaving in July.

    I don't love the job, but I've always had a good relationship with my boss. My postion is highly specialized, and its knowledge base can only be acquired on the job, meaning it's not easy to find a qualified replacement. That's why I'm inclined to give them more than the requisite two weeks. None of my subordinates can step into the job. They will definitely bring in an outsider.

    I'm just a little bit worried that they'll find a candidate sooner than I'm ready to leave or decide that one of my people can be acting director while they search and "ask me to resign".
     
  6. Jangofett

    Jangofett Senior member

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    I'm leaving because my wife accepted a position in another city back in December. Due to contractual obligations, she can't leave until July. We have a two-month old, so I won't leave before the entire family can move. The end result being that I've known since December that I'm leaving in July.

    I don't love the job, but I've always had a good relationship with my boss. My postion is highly specialized, and its knowledge base can only be acquired on the job, meaning it's not easy to find a qualified replacement. That's why I'm inclined to give them more than the requisite two weeks. None of my subordinates can step into the job. They will definitely bring in an outsider.

    I'm just a little bit worried that they'll find a candidate sooner than I'm ready to leave or decide that one of my people can be acting director while they search and "ask me to resign".


    Er, you know since Dec, you are leaving in July.
    But your boss and your company do not know, right?
    So just tender in the middle of June.

    If you want to do the right thing, you can tell them 2 months in advance so they can look for someone who can be trained by you. BUT REMEMBER, your boss may be pissed and tell you to f*ck off.

    Which means you got 6 weeks of no pay at home. Its a fucking cruel world out there and if you dont think of no. 1, no one would.

    But we can both be paranoid. If you are not leaving for the competitor, there is no reason for your boss to be capricious and vindictive and your boss may appreciate your efforts but legally, they can tell you to buzz off after 2 weeks or pay you the 2 weeks and tell you to pack your things and move out ASAP.

    But if you are silly enough to tell people all this while you are leaving in July, ...[​IMG]
     
  7. otc

    otc Senior member

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    but legally, they can tell you to buzz off after 2 weeks or pay you the 2 weeks and tell you to pack your things and move out ASAP.

    I didn't think the 2 weeks thing had any legal standard? Isn't it just a rule of thumb that is often also included in your contract (which may specify more or less time)?

    My assumption would be that they pay you for the two weeks so they don't have to fire you and make you eligible for unemployment insurance--basically you are still quitting the job on the date you decided and are ineligible for unemployment since you quit, but they won't let you in the building.

    I'm not sure how far out this goes, but if you tell them now that you are leaving in a few months and they fire you immediately, can't you cash in your remaining vacation and go on unemployment?
     
  8. gladhands

    gladhands Senior member

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    I'm not sure how far out this goes, but if you tell them now that you are leaving in a few months and they fire you immediately, can't you cash in your remaining vacation and go on unemployment?

    This would be my assumption.
     
  9. tundrafour

    tundrafour Senior member

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    If you really think there's a chance they'll fire you, then just give two weeks' notice.

    I gave my boss a few months' notice at my last job, but only because I knew there was no way they'd get rid of me early. Had that been a real possibility, I would definitely just have given two weeks.
     
  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    They do not need to "fire" you. Once you give resignation it is up to the employer whether or not they wish to accept it "immediately" or let you work out your notice. This might vary by state, I don't know as I'm not a labour attorney, but I can tell you that's how it works in my state. Give notice and you can have it accepted on an immediate basis. However, if you have specialized knowledge you need to pass on, and a good relationship with your boss, I would tell them 4-6 weeks out. These days a 30 day notice is considered the standard in professional positions.

    Also, if they are looking to reduce the workforce as you indicated, they can do a RIF but that will make you eligible for unemployment.
     
  11. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    I'm leaving because my wife accepted a position in another city back in December. Due to contractual obligations, she can't leave until July. We have a two-month old, so I won't leave before the entire family can move. The end result being that I've known since December that I'm leaving in July.

    I don't love the job, but I've always had a good relationship with my boss. My postion is highly specialized, and its knowledge base can only be acquired on the job, meaning it's not easy to find a qualified replacement. That's why I'm inclined to give them more than the requisite two weeks. None of my subordinates can step into the job. They will definitely bring in an outsider.

    I'm just a little bit worried that they'll find a candidate sooner than I'm ready to leave or decide that one of my people can be acting director while they search and "ask me to resign".


    I get what you are saying and can tell you want to be a "good guy" but given you know there is a chance they could drop you early, giving standard notice is best. Of course, if by cutting you early it would create a severance package for you, you might be better off.

    Maybe they'd buy you out now in a way that was more lucrative for you?
     
  12. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    I didn't think the 2 weeks thing had any legal standard? Isn't it just a rule of thumb that is often also included in your contract (which may specify more or less time)?

    My assumption would be that they pay you for the two weeks so they don't have to fire you and make you eligible for unemployment insurance--basically you are still quitting the job on the date you decided and are ineligible for unemployment since you quit, but they won't let you in the building.

    I'm not sure how far out this goes, but if you tell them now that you are leaving in a few months and they fire you immediately, can't you cash in your remaining vacation and go on unemployment?


    unemployment will not provide you with the full amount of money your are actually making. it caps out and can be significantly less than your salary.

    while i agree with piob that 30 days is a fair amount of time for someone in a proffesional setting, especially because you provide a specialized sets of skills. if you think there is a good possibility they will let you go sooner and you will lose out on pay you should give 2 weeks max. you dont need to go beyond the call of duty if your kindness will only be repayed with vengance.

    i would say to make the most edgucated guess about what your employer will do and go from there. anywhere from 1 week if you think he will fire you on the spot, to 6 weeks if he would want you to stay on and train your replacement as long as you are able

    whatever you do good luck, and the most important thing is to stay above any inappropriate behavior no matter how the boss behaves. its always good in the long run to act like a proffesional, even if everyone around you isnt

    my 2 cents anyways

    edit: btw you can tell what kind of work setting and what level of employment people have from their responses [​IMG]
     
  13. alliswell

    alliswell Senior member

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    What country are you in? There are responses from at least two countries above, and they may or may not be relevant.
     
  14. gladhands

    gladhands Senior member

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    I decided to be a stand-up guy, but hedged my bets in doing so. I verbally told my boss that I would be leaving in the coming months, but did not tender a formal letter of resignation.

    I've been asked to assist in finding and training my replacement.
     
  15. thebac

    thebac Senior member

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    I agree with this. If there's a chance they'll let you go early, you should do the professional thing and give at least two weeks notice, but not more.

    If it were the case that you know that your employer needs to replace you and they'll want you to train your replacement, and you've observed that other departing employees weren't screwed over, give more notice (but it seems that you believe your employer to be in contraction mode).

    The good part about your departure is that you're not going to a direct competitor in the same city.

    If you really think there's a chance they'll fire you, then just give two weeks' notice.

    I gave my boss a few months' notice at my last job, but only because I knew there was no way they'd get rid of me early. Had that been a real possibility, I would definitely just have given two weeks.
     

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