• Hi, I am the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear.
  • This site contains affiliate links for which Styleforum may be compensated.
  • Epaulet x Styleforum Alpine Loden Collection

    Loden wool, woven in Tirol for centuries, is known for its resistance to cold and wetness. Our project in collaboration with Epaulet introduces Alpine Loden, a modern 18oz fabric blend of 75% merino wool and 25% nylon, woven in Italy. It's lighter, more durable, wind-resistant, and more comfortable than traditional Loden fabric. Partnering with Rochester Tailored Clothing, we offer custom garments like sportcoats, suits, and overcoats, made to your specifications. Learn more about the Loden collection here.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

    Styleforum is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

Getting Hemmed Jeans to Look Authentic

escarole

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2008
Messages
164
Reaction score
0
I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it, but in my decade plus of denim addiction I still haven't figured out a reliable way to shorten non-raw jeans. I've got a pair I want to work on that has a bit of taper, so the original hem idea is out - plus, original hems always look like **** anyway. I feel like nobody is fooled by that technique.. So my question is whether there is any way to get normal hems to look "new." Is repeated washing the only way?
 

graphicd

Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2009
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Is this what you're referring to as the "original hem idea"? I don't think the results are bad at all if done properly.
 

entrero

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
1,079
Reaction score
13
I've had a few jeans hemmed that way and yes if done properly you won't notice it, also depends on how much you want it shortened. But I've always wondered if its possible to recreate that original hem look...
 

Scooba

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2010
Messages
339
Reaction score
0
I do that procedure on all my jeans with my own sewing machine. I am only a 30 inch inseam so all denim is too big for me. No one can tell its been done. You can only do it on straight legs though so i am curious about doing it on tapers since I want a pair of APC NS or N&F Weird Guys
 

entrero

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
1,079
Reaction score
13
It turns out for RAW denim to get that roping effect, hem has to be chain-stitched and of course the jeans should be washed. On non RAW the whole shrinking process is already over, you won't be able to "recreate" the original look.
 

Ludeykrus

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 27, 2007
Messages
2,256
Reaction score
4
Originally Posted by entrero
It turns out for RAW denim to get that roping effect, hem has to beain-stitched and of course the jeans should be washed. On non RAW the whole shrinking process is already over, you won't be able to "recreate" the original look.

Turns out this actually isn't correct. A straight lockstitch will also cause roping. Whodini has posted pics in the past of his RRL's, IIRC, which had great roping with a normal straight lockstitch.

I've been sewing a lot of really thick stuff lately, and I believe it's confirmed that the distorted fabric causing good roping is from a relatively high presser foot pressure/tension. What happens is the feed dogs on a sewing machine pull the lower fabric layer backwards in the feeding process, while the presser foot presses down on the top layer and holds it back a bit. This uneven feeding of the fabrics causes the twisted roping phenomena. Here's a few crappy pics from a recent project showing it:

07-1.jpg


01-3.jpg



I'm actually now curious as to how the chain stitch/roping urban legend came about.
 

KitAkira

Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!
Spamminator Moderator
Joined
Feb 13, 2008
Messages
8,589
Reaction score
118
Well modern machines work to eliminate that problem, so likely it was originally only seen on jeans that were chainstitched since the old chainstitching machines would cause that uneven pulling (you will also tend to see the seam not lining properly when upturned at the hem)
 

Mike 669

New Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2024
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Late finding this. I also concluded that the roping effect requires at least high presser foot pressure and possibly greater thread tension. Thread tension definitely helped my chain stitching, but since the chain part is on the inside of jeans hems that doesn't really make any difference, I guess - the visible half of the stitch just looks like a regular straight stitch. (I still love using chain stitch because there's no bobbin to bother with...) The explanation above makes the most sense - uneven feeding, which makes me think that there is something unique to commercial chain stitch machines (purpose built) which causes this effect. I'm going to play around on my compound feed machine and another industrial machine to see if I can reproduce this "flawed" hem.
 

double00

Stylish Dinosaur
Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
17,529
Reaction score
17,979
Late finding this. I also concluded that the roping effect requires at least high presser foot pressure and possibly greater thread tension. Thread tension definitely helped my chain stitching, but since the chain part is on the inside of jeans hems that doesn't really make any difference, I guess - the visible half of the stitch just looks like a regular straight stitch. (I still love using chain stitch because there's no bobbin to bother with...) The explanation above makes the most sense - uneven feeding, which makes me think that there is something unique to commercial chain stitch machines (purpose built) which causes this effect. I'm going to play around on my compound feed machine and another industrial machine to see if I can reproduce this "flawed" hem.

pre-rack the fabric before you sew , duh .
 

Featured Sponsor

Invisible Socks: Convenience or Curse?

  • Convenience

  • Curse


Results are only viewable after voting.

Forum statistics

Threads
511,431
Messages
10,630,984
Members
225,605
Latest member
shaughnessyrodney
Top