General Bike Thread (Desiderata, questions, porn)

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by kronik, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    Riding: 2004 custom Kish Fabrication road; 3/2.5 titanium.
    [​IMG]

    Selling or building up: 2005 stock Calfee Tetra Pro; extra-stiff H-M 42/55 msi carbon fiber.
    [​IMG]

    Selling or re-painting and building up: 2005 custom Pegoretti Marcelo; Columbus Spirit steel.
    [​IMG]

    Selling: 2005 custom Kish Fabrication hardtail; 3/2.5 titanium.
    [​IMG]

    Sold: 2000 custom Strong Frames road; Columbus Foco steel.
    [​IMG]

    Sold: 1990 stock Bridgestone RB-1; Ishiwata steel.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    merlin's website says they're gonna have a rebirth, but knowing how slow the bike industry moves I bet that won't happen anytime soon. I'm out of the loop with seven and just know them for making mtm titanium frames, and was surprised while looking at their catalog that they're also doing carbon fiber for road. guess changes like this are inevitable..

    "Rebirth" in the sense that ABG has sold Merlin Metaloworks to Competitive Cyclist. An odd move, in my opinion. "ABG will retain the rights to manufacture and sell Merlin products to buyers in the Asian Markets through the year 2012."

    What happens after that, who knows? But CC is not and never has been a frame-builder, only a retailer. If the "reborn Merlin" becomes the CC house brand as "Douglas" was for Colorado Cyclist or "Macalu" for Excel Sports, I don't really see that taking off. The Merlin brand has been somewhat in decline ever since ABG bought it, and I doubt even CC's marketing prowess can really revive it. Perhaps CC believes it can sell off-shore Ti frames at a premium here in the US. No doubt the praise on their own website will be effusive. We'll see.

    There is a lot of domestic, high-quality ti competition already in the US (Moots; Kish Fabrication; Kent Eriksen; Seven; Spectrum (I believe Kellogg now uses Seven for ti brazing; he used to contract with Merlin); Independent Fabrication; new IF spin-off Firefly; Serotta; Litespeed (ABG); Lynskey; etc...).

    It will be interesting to see what happens with Merlin.
     
  3. acidboy

    acidboy Senior member

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    Selling:
    [​IMG]


    that is one sexay frame [​IMG]

    btw, speaking of your raceface crank...

    so let me see... bank shut its doors, and wasn't able to sell it as a whole operating concern, and now they're probably gonna sell it piece by piece. Ihope someday it goes by what happened to yeti where former employees bought the company and resurrected it. [​IMG]
     
  4. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    that is one sexay frame [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Thanks much! Jim Kish is one hell of a good builder.

    btw, speaking of your raceface crank...

    so let me see... bank shut its doors, and wasn't able to sell it as a whole operating concern, and now they're probably gonna sell it piece by piece. I hope someday it goes by what happened to yeti where former employees bought the company and resurrected it. [​IMG]


    Yes, really too bad about RF. Great components. I do hope they come back or someone decent buys them and resurrects or integrates their stuff into a line.
     
  5. LawrenceMD

    LawrenceMD Senior member

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    ^^ damn those are all archetype bikes you have. talk about having the the good stuff.

    nice collection. What can you say about the RB1?

    to say those RB1s have a cult following is an understatement.
     
  6. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    ^^ damn those are all archetype bikes you have. talk about having the the good stuff.

    nice collection. What can you say about the RB1?

    to say those RB1s have a cult following is an understatement.


    Thanks much.
    Cycling has been a long-time passion.
    Not pictured (sold years ago) are a beautiful Scapin SPX and a very nice deep orange Olympia (my first "real" race bike; destroyed it [​IMG] ) and a few others.

    The RB-1 is a fantastic frame. I sometimes regret selling that one, but it made room for the Strong. The RB-1 is rock solid, handles very well, but is really a very heavy frame, esp. compared to the Kish, Pegoretti, Calfee and Strong. I think it was heavier than the Scapin even. The cult following is justified. The bike was extremely well-designed and built, and was very, very stable. The most beautiful ones are those ('93) with the gorgeous Ritchey double-crown fork, imo.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    Is that Marcelo a 57 or 58? If you decide to sell it and if it's a 57, let me know. I have a Palosanto, but I've never seen a Marcelo in the "Nails" scheme. I like it.

    And in other news, I hope you kept the Turbomatic from the RB-1. I like Regals and Ariones, buy nothing compares to a Turbomatic. Best saddle ever!
     
  8. poorman

    poorman Senior member

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    I noticed this thread on the home page, which is perfect because I've been thinking about a new bicycle, I'll ask questions before even looking through the thread!

    I'm looking for an upgrade from my rusty Wal-Mart mountain bike that I use to ride to school. I usually ride through bumpy ass messed up streets, all chipped up with gravel all over the place so I'd like something that could handle that and fast too?

    Is it generally cheaper to assemble your own bike than buying one?

    Being a student cost is an issue! haha. I do view this as an investment though considering the amount of money I'm spending on gas. :/

    So is it possible to find a nice bike for about <$300? or even cheaper that I could build up?

    I'm about 5'8".

    Thanks...

    (now jumps to page 1)
     
  9. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    Is that Marcelo a 57 or 58? If you decide to sell it and if it's a 57, let me know. I have a Palosanto, but I've never seen a Marcelo in the "Nails" scheme. I like it.

    And in other news, I hope you kept the Turbomatic from the RB-1. I like Regals and Ariones, buy nothing compares to a Turbomatic. Best saddle ever!


    Sorry, the Marcelo would be too large for you imo.
    The frame is a slightly modified nominal 60:
    58.5 c-c st / 59.5 c-c tt / 18.5 ht / 41.2 cs / 72 sta / 73 hta.

    The standard Pegoretti ht extension was cut down from the normal 20.5cm to 18.5cm.

    Palosantos are excellent frames as well, a bit more forgiving than the Marcelo. Yes, the "Nails" scheme is quite nice; the blue is a really nice, deep color.

    I agree with the Turbomatic: great saddle. But that one was, as they get, pretty hard. I sold the RB-1 complete and am very happy on Airones now.
     
  10. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    I noticed this thread on the home page, which is perfect because I've been thinking about a new bicycle, I'll ask questions before even looking through the thread!

    I'm looking for an upgrade from my rusty Wal-Mart mountain bike that I use to ride to school. I usually ride through bumpy ass messed up streets, all chipped up with gravel all over the place so I'd like something that could handle that and fast too?

    Perhaps look into mtb again, as you are used to that geometry/ride quality.
    However, mtb is really not the best frame type for commuting, even on beat-up paved roads: the advantages of the frame geometry and suspension aren't fully utilized, and the disadvantages (bike weight; speed (fatter, knobby tires); some handling issues; etc.) are exacerbated.

    I would really recommend either a "city" bicycle or, even better, a cyclo-cross or a "cross-muter" type of frame; these will handle much more like a road frame, but with fatter tires than road (skinnier than mtb though) and eyelets, etc. for racks and fenders.

    Remove the racks and fenders from a c-x or cross-muter bicycle and you have a decent road bicycle and an excellent fire-road/bad road bicycle.

    Is it generally cheaper to assemble your own bike than buying one?
    No. Certainly not for an entry-level bicycle.
    Shops sell package deals with components/assembly/future maintenance included.
    Acquiring a frame/fork and components separately requires experience, knowledge and research, and unless you will then do your own assembly you will be paying a shop to do that as well.

    Being a student cost is an issue! haha. I do view this as an investment though considering the amount of money I'm spending on gas. :/
    Then buy the best bicycle/components you can afford and take care of it. A crappy bicycle is not a good investment.

    So is it possible to find a nice bike for about <$300? or even cheaper that I could build up?
    Yes, probably. Not new, though.
    Scour your local Craigslist, campus paper/bulletin boards and bicycle shop bulletin boards and with luck and patience you will probably find a decent deal.
    I bought the blue/white Bridgestone RB-1 posted above (a truly excellent bicycle) used, but in mint condition, for $400 on Craigslist. A used bicycle is probably the way to go for you, if the frame is a good one, Slowly, you can then upgrade components as required.
    There are tons of used bicycles on the market now, and it is a buyer's market.

    I'm about 5'8".
    This tells us nothing, really.
    You need to test ride a variety of frames in order to understand even your basic size.
    Also, mtb sizing is far more flexible/generous than road or c-x frame sizing.
    One can always modify size somewhat by adjusting the seat height and changing the stem length/angle, but nonetheless on a road or c-x frame one really needs to be quite precise re: the frame size/geo.

    Good luck!
     
  11. poorman

    poorman Senior member

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    ^Thanks man! I'm going to look into that.
     
  12. il ciclista

    il ciclista Senior member

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    well I couldn't stop and got the weight weenie disease:

    now its 15.15lbs with a new fork and whole new SRAM Red group set.

    [​IMG]

    Details about the whole build, components list, weights, ect is
    here.

    I'm done saving weight on this damn bike... its time to ride the hell out of it.


    so was it worth the 1&3/4 lbs? I'd just pedal harder it's cheaper lol I'm sure the drivetrain must feel better though. [​IMG]
     
  13. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Some pics from my ride to work in the chicago blizzard.

    Zombie apocolypse on lake shore drive
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Riding fixed with cx tires because there is no way the brakes work in this stuff [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Althis

    Althis Senior member

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  15. about11oclock

    about11oclock Senior member

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    Dear Bike thread collected wisdom,

    Greeting from the runners! I bike commute in New York City, and wonder if someone can suggest some full-fingered gloves for everyday use. I will be beating the shit out of them and would like something that can take it. I would like to spend as little as possible for the desired effect (really tough gloves), but will spend what it takes to get what I want. I would also like my hands protected in the event of a crash, and hopefully, the gloves themselves could survive the crash and remain usable.

    Many thanks.
     

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