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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, questions, porn)

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by kronik, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    ^^ damn those are all archetype bikes you have. talk about having the the good stuff.

    nice collection. What can you say about the RB1?

    to say those RB1s have a cult following is an understatement.


    Thanks much.
    Cycling has been a long-time passion.
    Not pictured (sold years ago) are a beautiful Scapin SPX and a very nice deep orange Olympia (my first "real" race bike; destroyed it [​IMG] ) and a few others.

    The RB-1 is a fantastic frame. I sometimes regret selling that one, but it made room for the Strong. The RB-1 is rock solid, handles very well, but is really a very heavy frame, esp. compared to the Kish, Pegoretti, Calfee and Strong. I think it was heavier than the Scapin even. The cult following is justified. The bike was extremely well-designed and built, and was very, very stable. The most beautiful ones are those ('93) with the gorgeous Ritchey double-crown fork, imo.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    Is that Marcelo a 57 or 58? If you decide to sell it and if it's a 57, let me know. I have a Palosanto, but I've never seen a Marcelo in the "Nails" scheme. I like it.

    And in other news, I hope you kept the Turbomatic from the RB-1. I like Regals and Ariones, buy nothing compares to a Turbomatic. Best saddle ever!
     
  3. poorman

    poorman Senior member

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    I noticed this thread on the home page, which is perfect because I've been thinking about a new bicycle, I'll ask questions before even looking through the thread!

    I'm looking for an upgrade from my rusty Wal-Mart mountain bike that I use to ride to school. I usually ride through bumpy ass messed up streets, all chipped up with gravel all over the place so I'd like something that could handle that and fast too?

    Is it generally cheaper to assemble your own bike than buying one?

    Being a student cost is an issue! haha. I do view this as an investment though considering the amount of money I'm spending on gas. :/

    So is it possible to find a nice bike for about <$300? or even cheaper that I could build up?

    I'm about 5'8".

    Thanks...

    (now jumps to page 1)
     
  4. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    Is that Marcelo a 57 or 58? If you decide to sell it and if it's a 57, let me know. I have a Palosanto, but I've never seen a Marcelo in the "Nails" scheme. I like it.

    And in other news, I hope you kept the Turbomatic from the RB-1. I like Regals and Ariones, buy nothing compares to a Turbomatic. Best saddle ever!


    Sorry, the Marcelo would be too large for you imo.
    The frame is a slightly modified nominal 60:
    58.5 c-c st / 59.5 c-c tt / 18.5 ht / 41.2 cs / 72 sta / 73 hta.

    The standard Pegoretti ht extension was cut down from the normal 20.5cm to 18.5cm.

    Palosantos are excellent frames as well, a bit more forgiving than the Marcelo. Yes, the "Nails" scheme is quite nice; the blue is a really nice, deep color.

    I agree with the Turbomatic: great saddle. But that one was, as they get, pretty hard. I sold the RB-1 complete and am very happy on Airones now.
     
  5. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    I noticed this thread on the home page, which is perfect because I've been thinking about a new bicycle, I'll ask questions before even looking through the thread!

    I'm looking for an upgrade from my rusty Wal-Mart mountain bike that I use to ride to school. I usually ride through bumpy ass messed up streets, all chipped up with gravel all over the place so I'd like something that could handle that and fast too?

    Perhaps look into mtb again, as you are used to that geometry/ride quality.
    However, mtb is really not the best frame type for commuting, even on beat-up paved roads: the advantages of the frame geometry and suspension aren't fully utilized, and the disadvantages (bike weight; speed (fatter, knobby tires); some handling issues; etc.) are exacerbated.

    I would really recommend either a "city" bicycle or, even better, a cyclo-cross or a "cross-muter" type of frame; these will handle much more like a road frame, but with fatter tires than road (skinnier than mtb though) and eyelets, etc. for racks and fenders.

    Remove the racks and fenders from a c-x or cross-muter bicycle and you have a decent road bicycle and an excellent fire-road/bad road bicycle.

    Is it generally cheaper to assemble your own bike than buying one?
    No. Certainly not for an entry-level bicycle.
    Shops sell package deals with components/assembly/future maintenance included.
    Acquiring a frame/fork and components separately requires experience, knowledge and research, and unless you will then do your own assembly you will be paying a shop to do that as well.

    Being a student cost is an issue! haha. I do view this as an investment though considering the amount of money I'm spending on gas. :/
    Then buy the best bicycle/components you can afford and take care of it. A crappy bicycle is not a good investment.

    So is it possible to find a nice bike for about <$300? or even cheaper that I could build up?
    Yes, probably. Not new, though.
    Scour your local Craigslist, campus paper/bulletin boards and bicycle shop bulletin boards and with luck and patience you will probably find a decent deal.
    I bought the blue/white Bridgestone RB-1 posted above (a truly excellent bicycle) used, but in mint condition, for $400 on Craigslist. A used bicycle is probably the way to go for you, if the frame is a good one, Slowly, you can then upgrade components as required.
    There are tons of used bicycles on the market now, and it is a buyer's market.

    I'm about 5'8".
    This tells us nothing, really.
    You need to test ride a variety of frames in order to understand even your basic size.
    Also, mtb sizing is far more flexible/generous than road or c-x frame sizing.
    One can always modify size somewhat by adjusting the seat height and changing the stem length/angle, but nonetheless on a road or c-x frame one really needs to be quite precise re: the frame size/geo.

    Good luck!
     
  6. poorman

    poorman Senior member

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    ^Thanks man! I'm going to look into that.
     
  7. il ciclista

    il ciclista Senior member

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    well I couldn't stop and got the weight weenie disease:

    now its 15.15lbs with a new fork and whole new SRAM Red group set.

    [​IMG]

    Details about the whole build, components list, weights, ect is
    here.

    I'm done saving weight on this damn bike... its time to ride the hell out of it.


    so was it worth the 1&3/4 lbs? I'd just pedal harder it's cheaper lol I'm sure the drivetrain must feel better though. [​IMG]
     
  8. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Some pics from my ride to work in the chicago blizzard.

    Zombie apocolypse on lake shore drive
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Riding fixed with cx tires because there is no way the brakes work in this stuff [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Althis

    Althis Senior member

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    Riverside, CA
  10. about11oclock

    about11oclock Senior member

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    Dear Bike thread collected wisdom,

    Greeting from the runners! I bike commute in New York City, and wonder if someone can suggest some full-fingered gloves for everyday use. I will be beating the shit out of them and would like something that can take it. I would like to spend as little as possible for the desired effect (really tough gloves), but will spend what it takes to get what I want. I would also like my hands protected in the event of a crash, and hopefully, the gloves themselves could survive the crash and remain usable.

    Many thanks.
     
  11. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I bought a pair of these at home depot:
    http://www.homedepot.com/Outdoors-Wo...atalogId=10053

    They come in basic black or whatever too (but my team colors are orange).

    I saw them in the discount bin and was going to buy them just for the orange factor but realized these are basically bike gloves. They seem to be made for guys who handle the big tools...like operating a jackhammer who cares more about grip/sweat/padding than protection. They are basically this without the knuckle plastic pieces. Padded in the palm, breathable in the back, reflective strip, terrycloth snot/sweat wipe...

    They don't seem like great work gloves (the breathable back wouldn't give much protection like a leather glove) but they are some good cheap bike gloves.
     
  12. LawrenceMD

    LawrenceMD Senior member

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    Dear Bike thread collected wisdom, Greeting from the runners! I bike commute in New York City, and wonder if someone can suggest some full-fingered gloves for everyday use. I will be beating the shit out of them and would like something that can take it. I would like to spend as little as possible for the desired effect (really tough gloves), but will spend what it takes to get what I want. I would also like my hands protected in the event of a crash, and hopefully, the gloves themselves could survive the crash and remain usable. Many thanks.
    I used these throughout the NYC winter, for both running and biking. http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/66559?feat=506510-GN3 [​IMG] honestly the only reason I bought them was all those $10 Gift coupons LL bean gave out during the holiday season that you could stack. So it was basically free. So I tried them out. They are basically cross country ski gloves (but listed as bike gloves in LL Bean) so there's no padding but excellent grip. I use them a lot even in 50ºF weather because they are flexible and light. During the hellish winter we had I used them with glove liners as well. After using them for the season I would actually say I think they are worth the near $50. Because they provide such excellent grip for the bike and braking and are protective too. They are very flexible and soft also. They have been my gloves for going out, driving, anything in the cold because you still can do things like take keys out your pocket and unlock a car/door with them still on. They are still in excellent shape too. I've used them when I tool on my bike when I need grip and have gotten them super grimy and greasy and would just throw them in the wash and even dryer too. I wash them once a week with Minimal shrinkage noted. You can get them cheaper than $50 other than LL bean, but you know that great LL bean return policy (no question's asked).
     
  13. otc

    otc Senior member

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    wait are you looking for just some gloves to ride in or for gloves to keep you warm?

    If you want to stay warm, craft makes some nice stuff (from the light stuff like Lawrence posted up to things like lobster mitts)
     
  14. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    Dear Bike thread collected wisdom,

    Greeting from the runners! I bike commute in New York City, and wonder if someone can suggest some full-fingered gloves for everyday use. I will be beating the shit out of them and would like something that can take it. I would like to spend as little as possible for the desired effect (really tough gloves), but will spend what it takes to get what I want. I would also like my hands protected in the event of a crash, and hopefully, the gloves themselves could survive the crash and remain usable.

    Many thanks.


    Yes, like otc I can't tell if the op is looking for general-use full-finger gloves or for winter-use full-finger gloves.

    I have listed some winter gloves here below, but these 4 stores also have a good selection of summer weight full-finger gloves. MTB f-f gloves are tougher than road gloves.

    Craft are good.

    Bicycling Hub always has good quality/good prices.
    These Exte-Ondo gloves are excellent and on sale ($30.00 in black or black/blue).
    [​IMG]

    These Pearl Izumi gloves from Excel Sports are also very good and tough ($40.00).
    [​IMG]

    A bunch on sale from Colorado Cyclist and Competitive Cyclist.

    These are all good gloves.
     
  15. erk

    erk Senior member

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    here is my race bike

    [​IMG]
     
  16. otc

    otc Senior member

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  17. Stylego

    Stylego Senior member

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    Kansas City, MO

    Is it generally cheaper to assemble your own bike than buying one?

    Being a student cost is an issue! haha. I do view this as an investment though considering the amount of money I'm spending on gas. :/

    So is it possible to find a nice bike for about <$300? or even cheaper that I could build up?

    I'm about 5'8".

    Thanks...

    (now jumps to page 1)


    Unless you're willing to wait ages, it's almost NEVER cheaper to build a bike than buy one out right. If you hit garage sales and CL you may be able to find a decent bike for <$300.
     
  18. about11oclock

    about11oclock Senior member

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    About face.
    wait are you looking for just some gloves to ride in or for gloves to keep you warm?

    If you want to stay warm, craft makes some nice stuff (from the light stuff like Lawrence posted up to things like lobster mitts)


    I actually have PI Lobster gloves for winter, they were a life saver, though next winter I might go for some winter-full finger gloves.

    I am looking for everyday use full-fingers. Thanks much for the links!
     
  19. CHenry

    CHenry Senior member

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    The hand of Grant Petersen in that Bridgestone spec.
     
  20. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    I actually have PI Lobster gloves for winter, they were a life saver, though next winter I might go for some winter-full finger gloves.

    I am looking for everyday use full-fingers. Thanks much for the links!

    Then your best selection for summer f-f gloves might be here.
    Some are winter gloves, though, since the gloves on CC are listed short-finger/full-finger and not winter/summer.

    The hand of Grant Petersen in that Bridgestone spec.

    Sure, since he basically designed/spec'd them all.
     

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