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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, Questions, Pics)

venessian

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The custom steel frame is likely cheaper than a high end CF frame. A custom Rock Lobster is $1750-2050 depending on materials. My Look 595 frame was $2500 when I bought it on sale at half price.
Absolutely, and a Rock Lobster is a frame built by a revered master (and great person), not some media-darling decorated duck like, say, Ritte (not that Ritte are terrible, just vastly over-valued imo).

Many of the smaller but life-time builders like Sadoff and similar represent great cost/value these days, for the attention, knowledge, skills and quality received. Hard to beat that even with non-custom off the peg. The "downside" is really needing to have enough fit experience to be able to communicate extremely clearly, concisely and 100% honestly one's custom desires and requirements, including knowing when not to press the builder.
 

Fueco

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Absolutely, and a Rock Lobster is a frame built by a revered master (and great person), not some media-darling decorated duck like, say, Ritte (not that Ritte are terrible, just vastly over-valued imo).

Many of the smaller but life-time builders like Sadoff and similar represent great cost/value these days, for the attention, knowledge, skills and quality received. Hard to beat that even with non-custom off the peg. The "downside" is really needing to have enough fit experience to be able to communicate extremely clearly, concisely and 100% honestly one's custom desires and requirements, including knowing when not to press the builder.
I really want another Lobster, mostly because I know Paul is going to retire fairly soon. He keeps hinting at it, and I doubt he’ll still be building in five years. I’m kind of thinking about selling my Look and going for it.
 

sugarbutch

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Yes, there really is no need to go to brands (regardless of country) that are relatively new with no proven long-term c-f track record. I fear the manufacturing qc and/or compromises too, and have no interest in saving relatively marginal sums on crap-shoot quality and durability. Plus, one can't test ride those things. There are plenty of very established brands out there, used and new, that are much more worthy of one's time and research.

I have ridden Hunt wheels but do not own them. They were fine. Long-term reviews from those I know who do own Hunts are good. On cycling websites Hunts have no major negative issues I read of and seem generally praised. November are also mentioned in that market/context, along with a few others, if one really feels they need c-f wheels.
We don't "need" any of this stuff. :)
 

venessian

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I really want another Lobster, mostly because I know Paul is going to retire fairly soon. He keeps hinting at it, and I doubt he’ll still be building in five years. I’m kind of thinking about selling my Look and going for it.
Yes, he must be getting near there. How old is he now?

As you would be a repeat customer who knows the deal and he you, it seems like a no-brainer if you are looking for another bicycle. EVERY person I have known who ordered a first frame from someone, loved it, kept putting off the desired second one, whether Sachs or Della Santa or Eisentraut or Kent Eriksen (but Brad Bingham is great) or Bruce Gordon (RIP) etc...have ALL regretted the decision not to at least queue up so they would be notified by the builder, "Last chance, I'm retiring soon." before the door closed forever.

I have been in "the queue up before it's too late" mindset for a fillet-brazed Steve Rex for years, even discussed with him several times, but never get to the final decision point. I think selling a frameset, like you with your Look, might be a good motivator. That guy is really great.
 

venessian

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We don't "need" any of this stuff. :)
No, of course not.

Except for the "energy is eternal delight" enjoyment which some "stuff" genuinely does provide. ;)

But the overkill stuff? Definitely not needed, and it doesn't even add much if anything to the delight, really.
 
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patrick_b

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The custom steel frame is likely cheaper than a high end CF frame. A custom Rock Lobster is $1750-2050 depending on materials. My Look 595 frame was $2500 when I bought it on sale at half price.
great advice.

I've been semi-seriously considering another ti or ti/cf by either Seven Cycles or Firefly, both of which are titanium masters and Boston based so I could do measurements and customizations with the actual maker. Firefly has a year wait but Seven is about 10-11 weeks. They have great custom paint options as well.

I’ve always had a thing for titanium and bought a Litespeed frame back in 97. It was my dream MTB and I still ride it. I feel fortunate to have bought it then as Litespeed was sold a few years later and the family founders all left.
 

am55

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Averaged 13.1mph today for a 13mi ride all but 1.8mi on gravel. The same loop 5 weeks ago took me 15 min longer and I needed a rest stop. Not bad for an old guy on an old bike.

Came across this London custom framebuilder and couldn't stop drooling. The Reynolds steel combined with CF really is gorgeous. Bike Appreciation at its finest.

View attachment 1590802

As a former Reynolds frame rider I'm surprised they managed to make it look modern :D

They're great frames but you feel distinctly out of time when parking the thing next to all the Cervelo and Bianchi bling at races. I do miss the road feel and lightness in the hand as well as whilst riding. I do not miss the paint schemes common with that maker.
 

patrick_b

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As a former Reynolds frame rider I'm surprised they managed to make it look modern :D

They're great frames but you feel distinctly out of time when parking the thing next to all the Cervelo and Bianchi bling at races. I do miss the road feel and lightness in the hand as well as whilst riding. I do not miss the paint schemes common with that maker.
Before the Litespeed I had a Paramount with Reynolds tubes. It was one of the handful of Paramount frames made by Waterford in WI.
I wish I had a picture of it. It was beautiful.

I sold it to a collector years later. You know those crazy old guys who drool over steel and lugs 😉.
 

venessian

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I've been semi-seriously considering another ti or ti/cf by either Seven Cycles or Firefly, both of which are titanium masters and Boston based so I could do measurements and customizations with the actual maker. Firefly has a year wait but Seven is about 10-11 weeks. They have great custom paint options as well.
Both Firefly and Seven are great titanium builders, with A+ pedigrees (Firefly from IF and Seven from Merlin), but there are so many others these days following the titanium explosion of ~2000, especially in the US, that I wouldn't confine your search to only those two companies if you do not have to.

Local shopping of course is super, but not really required these days as a good bicycle shop will do excellent fits one can then forward to and discuss with a builder. IBC in Boston were very good, are now closed afaik, but surely their ex-fitters have found good shops in the area.

Jim Kish is a great ti builder; Moots of course; Steve Potts; Bill Holland + Mike Garcia (ex-Reynolds c-f guru, designed all their forks); Bingham Built (ex-Kent Eriksen and prior ex-Moots master); Independent Fabrications; No. 22; Max Kullaway/333Fab; Mike DeSalvo; Alliance; Mosaic; Rob Quiring; Bill Davidson; and others, all in the US. All reliable, experienced, established, very respected titanium pros.

Also, used Merlin (esp RSR) or Tom Kellogg/Spectrum, or Eriksen or Moots, if the geometry and older "limitations" such as no tapered head tubes, no disc brakes, less grav/road tire clearance, etc., are OK with the buyer, are fantastic.

I’ve always had a thing for titanium and bought a Litespeed frame back in 97. It was my dream MTB and I still ride it. I feel fortunate to have bought it then as Litespeed was sold a few years later and the family founders all left.
The Lynskey family founded Litespeed in 1986, then sold LS to ABG for family reasons in 1999, then re-founded the current Lynskey, which is still going strong, in 2006. Very good builders and bicycles, very high value/dollar.
 

venessian

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Before the Litespeed I had a Paramount with Reynolds tubes. It was one of the handful of Paramount frames made by Waterford in WI.
I wish I had a picture of it. It was beautiful.

I sold it to a collector years later. You know those crazy old guys who drool over steel and lugs 😉.
Super.

Those Waterford PDG Paramounts are amazing in all regards, more influential then they are often given credit for. Some great builders were involved early on. I think Waterford is a great company/bicycle even today.
 

patrick_b

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The Lynskey family founded Litespeed in 1986, then sold LS to ABG for family reasons in 1999, then re-founded the current Lynskey, which is still going strong, in 2006. Very good builders and bicycles, very high value/dollar.
Funny we just had a discussion about the Lynskey family when @smittycl was shopping. I still think he should have gone that route 😀.


The Lynskey's are rock star frame builders. The family founded Litespeed and hand built all those ti frames for years in TN. Prized frames from that era all carry David Lynskey's signature (like my Obed MTB). Litespeed eventually sold to American Bicycle Group in the late 90's. Litespeed owners the world over rejoiced when Lynskey opened their doors again in the late 00's.
 

Piobaire

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Nah, me and smitty are both gonna have integrated storage.
 

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