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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, Questions, Pics)

Piobaire

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Speaking of size, anyone have a link for a good sizing calculator? Been so long I don't even remember what size my last road bike was.
 

venessian

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Speaking of size, anyone have a link for a good sizing calculator? Been so long I don't even remember what size my last road bike was.
There is no "better" one, really. There are many online ("bicycle sizing calculator") and they all 1) start with one's inseam; 2) will vary some by bicycle type (mtb/road/e-bike...); 3) all result in approximations, nothing more.

One can start from them, but the resulting recommended size will be a gross number at best. For some purposes that may be fine (or just actually try some bicycles at your lbs), but for more specific use, especially road/tri/long-distance, more specific fitting is really necessary.

There are so many other variables, between body measurements, preferred riding style/terrain/use, differing brand approaches to frame geometry, and ultimate body-interface component choices (crankarm length, stem/bars, and saddle position) that a general-purpose sizing calculator is fairly useless, when certainly cm and even mm really matter.

For basic road bicycle fit starting point, I think the Guimard/Lemond method is still fairly respected. But, still really only an approximation.
 

Fueco

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There is no "better" one, really. There are many online ("bicycle sizing calculator") and they all 1) start with one's inseam; 2) will vary some by bicycle type (mtb/road/e-bike...); 3) all result in approximations, nothing more.

One can start from them, but the resulting recommended size will be a gross number at best. For some purposes that may be fine (or just actually try some bicycles at your lbs), but for more specific use, especially road/tri/long-distance, more specific fitting is really necessary.

There are so many other variables, between body measurements, preferred riding style/terrain/use, differing brand approaches to frame geometry, and ultimate body-interface component choices (crankarm length, stem/bars, and saddle position) that a general-purpose sizing calculator is fairly useless, when certainly cm and even mm really matter.

For basic road bicycle fit starting point, I think the Guimard/Lemond method is still fairly respected. But, still really only an approximation.
The rider’s physiology plays a big role as well. How flexible, how strong, and any lingering injuries can all play roles in how best to fit a bike. A calculator can approximate the fit, but only an experienced and well-trained bike fitter can determine proper fit.
 

venessian

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The rider’s physiology plays a big role as well. How flexible, how strong, and any lingering injuries can all play roles in how best to fit a bike. A calculator can approximate the fit, but only an experienced and well-trained bike fitter can determine proper fit.
Yes, as stated above.
 

Piobaire

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This is all sounding very expensive. How do people go to Target and buy bikes?

(FWIW I was just looking at a frame size spreadsheet. I've gone through a couple professional fittings but that was back in the 90s. I'm not looking to optimize my aero position or shave seconds off in a crit. I just want to be comfy on my new Synapse Carbon 105.)
 

venessian

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This is all sounding very expensive. How do people go to Target and buy bikes?

(FWIW I was just looking at a frame size spreadsheet. I've gone through a couple professional fittings but that was back in the 90s. I'm not looking to optimize my aero position or shave seconds off in a crit. I just want to be comfy on my new Synapse Carbon 105.)
They go to Target and straddle a bicycle.
If their inseam clears the toptube (anywhere on a level (horizontal) tt, or at the high point (would be at the head tube on a sloping tt, ie the "virtual" horizontal tt)) by ~2" / 5cm, they buy the bicycle.

But, I do not understand now your question:
do you already have a Synapse?
Or are you looking to buy one? If the latter, why not simply go to any Cannondale dealer and test ride one? That beats any sizing chart.

Any reputable bicycle dealer can put you on a few bicycles, look at you, and gauge your general size, for free. Some may have a fitting-specific "size cycle", like a Lemond, Serotta, etc. device, but that usually involves a true fit session, and may cost from $40-$100 for complete fit recommendations
 

otc

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This is all sounding very expensive. How do people go to Target and buy bikes?

(FWIW I was just looking at a frame size spreadsheet. I've gone through a couple professional fittings but that was back in the 90s. I'm not looking to optimize my aero position or shave seconds off in a crit. I just want to be comfy on my new Synapse Carbon 105.)
I went to a shop once that had a laser scanning system, but it was really just a fancy way to take your measurements. I think there are fancier versions that do a dynamic measurement....but the real value add is probably if they have a good database of frame sizes to compare to...but many of those are more about buying a new bike that matches a position you are already comfortable with. If you don't have a current bike and your body hasn't gotten used to a riding position since it has been a while...they won't be as helpful.

There's a possibility that the Synapse Carbon geometry just isn't quite right for you...that you can't know for sure without sitting on one.

In reality, most people just buy a bike that fits close enough. Those who know will go back for fine tuning of the fit (swap out a stem/saddle/post/bars/etc.)...those who really care will pay some fit guru to go through all of that with them, but you can get most of the way there without some $350/hr fit studio appointment.
 

otc

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And like I mentioned above, if you haven't been riding at all...your body will probably change in the first few months of ownership. You'll probably limber up, become more comfortable with a lower bar position, etc.

Extensive fit effort today would be wasted.
 

otc

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Too many bikes. Took advantage of the COVID buying frenzy to list this old friend. Had just been collecting dust since finishing my last build so I tuned it up, replaced a bad tire, and gave her a good wash/wax.

1990s Specialized Epic Pro (I think--hard to find this exact model online)

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Funky old-school design with carbon tubes attached to aluminum lugs. Not sure exactly what year, but they made these in the early 90s. Had 600 Ultegra components with STI levers which would say no older than 1992. Rear drivetrain was upgraded to 9sp Ultegra at some point. Everything was in great shape except the front shifter which occasionally sticks...

Funny drop bars that added an extra aero position down low, which was apparently UCI legal for a brief period but then banned.

The feeding frenzy is real. I ran by a local bike shop to try to get some junk platform pedals for test rides and their bike racks were almost entirely empty and they didn't have any plastic take-offs to give me (lucked out and the used shop up the street gave me a nice vintage metal set for $5)

Generated a ton of interest on craigslist alone and sold it in less than 24 hours to someone who was brand new to road bikes and didn't know how to shift STI levers. Probably could have upped the price and offered it on multiple platforms, but I mostly wanted it gone.
 

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