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Gaziano & Girling Appreciation & Shoe Appreciation Thread (including reviews, purchases, pictures, e

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by luk-cha, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. dddrees

    dddrees Senior member

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    Too be honest I have a problem thinking the Thorpe would be any good in suede, but vintage oak would be real nice.

    Too bad you didn't pickup the RL version like @Namor did when they were on eBay.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2015
  2. bespoken pa

    bespoken pa Senior member

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    I have beem toying around with the idea of an oyster suede dover. Suede is lacking in my rotation.
     
  3. coldinboston

    coldinboston Senior member

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    Tell me more about this instep cone? Is this something you can ask for in an MTO or is this a bespoke adjustment?
     
  4. dddrees

    dddrees Senior member

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    :D

    Now a Suede Dover, I could see a suede Dover.

    Personally I've been toying with a Polo Suede St James. I'm not a big Suede only shoe or boot person, but somehow a Polo St James would be really sweet.
     
  5. TtownMD

    TtownMD Senior member

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    That is very true lol
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    Well I'm sure you guys saw my polo St James and they are my favorite suede shoe! Get them if you can and you will love them. They are great from professional dress at work to jeans.
     
  7. dddrees

    dddrees Senior member

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    Well it certainly is on my radar screen now that I know the MH71 Last works so well for me.
     
  8. Steven Cash

    Steven Cash Senior member

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    Thought this might interest some people who have G&G boots on here.

    Since buying my Thorpes it began to bug me that the G&G shoe trees were highly sprung and that it was very difficult to get the trees in and the row of stitching at the back of the heel was particularly vulnerable to the rubbing of the heel piece.

    [​IMG]

    I decided to take the G&G shoe trees apart and reassemble with the springs taken out so they don't rub the heel piece when inserting but still provide the required shape.

    I drilled the holes out either side of the heel piece and there is a nail going through the full length which takes a bit of coaxing to be punched through.

    [​IMG]

    When punched through it can then be pulled out and the springs taken off the two guides.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    All that is needed then is for the nail to be put back without the springs inserted.

    [​IMG]

    Here you can see them in the boots with a slight gap that is clearly under no tension. Once I have worn them a few more times I shall make a wooden wedge to take up the slack to give back the tension it needs. I believe Corthay use a three block shoe tree and this is basically what I had in mind.
     
    2 people like this.
  9. Chowkin

    Chowkin Senior member

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  10. Steven Cash

    Steven Cash Senior member

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    That is very interesting - thank you.

    I can see why they would reserve them for bespoke only though. The middle pieces that I will need to make for each of my trees will be very different to one another. Presumably the fact that both the shoes and the shoe trees are hand made/assembled creates tolerances both ways which need to be factored in.

    Those three piece boot trees are a work of art though.

    Out of interest do bespoke customers receive three piece shoe trees or is it just for the boots?
     
  11. A Guy from Shanghai

    A Guy from Shanghai Senior member

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    Can you cut the spring to make it a bit shorter to reduce the tension?
     
  12. Steven Cash

    Steven Cash Senior member

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    They certainly could be cut to length yes. It would be trial and error due to the fact that both shoe trees (in my case) need adjusting by a different amount so you would need to cut the springs to individual lengths.

    My preference towards the addition of a third piece is that it the tree can be placed in the boot in their fully compressed state and then be increased whilst in position. The springs are quite strong in the shoe trees and I found it very fiddly to compress them and push them down in the boots at the same time - however it was only the rubbing of the row of stitching running down the heels that concerned me.

    If worst comes to the worst it is completely reversible at this stage.
     
  13. grc1

    grc1 Senior member

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    It's a piece that they fit on top of the standard last to give a roomier instep relative to the standard shoe - I've done it now on all my MTO's.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. sacafotos

    sacafotos Senior member

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    Good call. I know you can request this from other makers.
     
  15. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Is the term "instep cone" your invention or G&G's? - That fitting-up piece is normally known as a "shover" in the shoe-trade .

    Impress the G&G boys the next time by asking for a shover to be fitted. :D
     
  16. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Is that right? I have not heard that...although I can see the derivation. Perhaps regional?

    The "cone" of the last is the part that corresponds to the instep of the foot.

    A shover is a fairly thick piece of leather intended to be used with a wedge to adjust the instep girth on "comb lasts"--lasts with flattened cones. And to allow the last to be pulled from the shoe.

    The case can be made that the shover, mechanically and functionally, takes the place of the cone of the last.

    AFAIK, "shovers" became obsolete, both in practice and in the language, when hinged or "slip cone" lasts were invented.

    [​IMG]

    --
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2015
  17. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Sabbage (Golding, vol.4, page 202) defines "shover" like this:

    Admittedly, Sabbage's shover covers also the top of the vamp and not just the cone but it is essentially a leather fitting-up piece to be glued or nailed in place and not to be used with a wedge that gets banged or shoved in (where presumably the name comes from).

    It seems these days the term is used for a fitting-up piece that goes from the vamp point (or slightly beyond) up the cone increasing in thickness. There might be short and long shovers, but, as I presume, the long shover is far less common than the short one, the meaning of the word has changed in almost 250 years.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2015
  18. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    +1

    The only problem with that is that except in rare instances a "shover"...in those terms--being "shoved"...cannot be "shoved" in to increase girth. As you suggest, an instep fitting can be glued or nailed into place before the shoe is made, or added to the last after the shoe is made and last has been pulled. But while the last is in the shoe the instep cannot be readjusted unless a slip cone last is being employed. At which point the 'slip cone" itself functions as the shover in the old sense and a wedge is indeed needed.

    Given the antecedents, I just can't see how the term "shover" is any more appropriate than "fitting' or "instep fitting" (although "instep cone" is gibberish.) And more to the point, I have never heard the term shover being used in the sense you are using it. Doesn't mean anything...like I said, may be regional. But "shover"meant a very specific technique and as you said, things have changed so much in the last 250 years, I, and many of my collegues, would, I suspect, regard "shover" as archaic.
     
  19. grc1

    grc1 Senior member

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    .... AAAAND this is why I try to avoid using technical terms on subjects that aren't my own personal area of expertise! :lol:
     
  20. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Well...and no offense...this is exactly the problem. To communicate you have to use precise terminology or resort to easily understood descriptions...like "build-up over the instep".... BengalStripe is right, making up your own terminology (if that's what happened with "instep cone") only confuses people...

    And generates spurious and OT discussions.

    :lol:
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2015

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