Gaziano & Girling Appreciation & Shoe Appreciation Thread (including reviews, purchases, pictures, e

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by luk-cha, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. quar

    quar Senior member

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    Hey, I'm no expert. I just buy shoes, I don't make them. But my point remains the same. I wear the JL7000 and the U-Last almost exclusively, so really, I'm the pot calling the kettle black, but these G&G designs have just taken it a step too far.

    God-forbid that I put-down some super-expensive bespoke product photographed by a store that has cult-like status around here. But I'm just calling it the way I see it.
     


  2. sspp

    sspp Active Member

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    Thank you for the interesting post DWFII, I agree with your breast v/s foot example! There are a few inaccuracies in your post, so I'll try to complement the definitions you offered.
    Velocity is a good example of a vector, but there are many others. Acceleration is also a vector, and so is any quantity that has a direction associated. Changes in magnitude do not necessarily imply a change in direction.
    What you're trying to explain is a concept called "smoothness". The strict definition involves derivatives (smooth means all derivatives are continuous), and can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smooth_function for those mathematically-inclined.
    As long as there are no "sudden" changes in acceleration, the trajectory we're tracing qualifies as smooth. As you can see, when tracing the toe of a shoe you have a very drastic change of direction, but that doesn't affect the smoothness of the curve. If you were to "bump" the pencil while you were tracing, then the resulting curve wouldn't be smooth at all, because that bump would mean a sudden change in acceleration, and therefore "break" the smoothness of the curve.
    Any trajectory without "bumps" would be a good example of a "fair" curve, such as a sine, cosine, or, indeed, a spiral. If you see any "sharp corners", that generally means the curve is not smooth.
    The golden mean is an interesting concept, and is intrinsically related to how we perceive proportion, but it's too deep a subject to explain in a few lines!
    Hope it helps!
     


  3. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    these are beautiful.
    ---
    is it may yet?
     


  4. Xenon

    Xenon Senior member

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    So if I am reading you and DWFII correctly a fair curve would be one without any points of "inflection". Not sure if inflection is the proper term as all my calculus was done in french but basically signifies a point of discernible change in direction (2nd derivative I believe =0 ????) . So for instance even when tracing carefully the foot in order to avoid bumps when you get to the toes you have to change direction. What I don't understand completely is how far a fair curve must have no inflection at all? If I look at a G&G TG73 it seems that there are many points of inflection which I believe add to the beauty not detract from it. That said this does appear to conflict with the young woman's breast example which I imagine as completely fair and perfect.
     


  5. sspp

    sspp Active Member

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    Xenon thank you for your reply, actually a point of inflection means a change in concavity. For a shoe example, the "arch" part of the shoe is concave, and the toe is convex, so there must be a point of inflection in between. You are correct when stating that a point of inflection means 2nd derivative = 0, but that doesn't imply a change of direction. Imagine a car accelerating to 100 km/h and then letting go of the gas pedal. The moment the acceleration changes sign (2nd derivative -acceleration- equals 0), is the point of inflection for the trajectory. But that doesn't mean the car has changed its direction!
    Now, if something bumps into the car and changes its acceleration in a non continuous manner (crash), that would make its trajectory not smooth.
    Regarding the "fair curve", I believe it's more about smoothness and grace of proportions than mathematical definitions.
     


  6. scottcw

    scottcw Senior member

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    This is interesting as I just today came across the Hove on Leffot and prefer the look to the Dover. My aesthetic is that the longer vamp makes it dressier, where the Dover looks like a casual walking shoe. Strictly one man's opinion...
     


  7. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    would look great on you. go for it :hide:
     


  8. rikod

    rikod Senior member

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    .
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012


  9. in stitches

    in stitches Kung Joo Moderator

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    yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

    :drool:
     


  10. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Oh hey, guys.
     


  11. Son Of Saphir

    Son Of Saphir Senior member

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    No no,
    it choice,
    Many Japanese man like long shoe like that.
    lt Japan trunk show shoe me think.
     


  12. culverwood

    culverwood Senior member

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    Perhaps the women you know are younger than the ones of my acquaintance but womens' feet are often less than perfect from walking around for years on high heeled shoes that are too narrow for them causing bunions etc. In general I would have said they are wider in proportion to length compared to men.
     


  13. Son Of Saphir

    Son Of Saphir Senior member

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    it look very good. :nodding:
     


  14. Xenon

    Xenon Senior member

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    I was focusing on the women in my family, but you're right, what I wrote was nonsense. I tend to have a very selective memory/focus where I wipe out any unpleasant images. Just today there was this cute woman at work and she was very young but despite that her feet appeared like those of women much older with all the deformities/irregularities you speak of.
     


  15. JL724

    JL724 Senior member

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    Any particular reason I never seem to see G&G shoes ordered in their grain or pigskin offerings? Calf and suede are obviously popular, but I have only seen one or two in grain and none in pigksin.

    Getting ready to place my next order for a pair of the Hoves and thought about trying something different. Already have:

    Burlington - Black Calf
    Hayes - Vintage Oak
    Rothschild - Vintage Rioja
    Walkton - Vintage Chestnut
     


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