• I'm happy to introduce the Styleforum Happy Hour, our brand new podcast featuring lively discussion about menswear and the fashion industry. In the inaugural edition, a discussion of what's going on in retail today. Please check it out on the Journal. All episodes will be also be available soon on your favorite podcast platform.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Gaining strength vs losing fat

KayJay85

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2009
Messages
217
Reaction score
6
I am 6'2" and 180 and I am trying to balance 2 goals which appear to be conflicting:
- I want to increase my strength and was going to use the Starting Strength routine I have seen posted here
- Despite my weight I have a tummy roll which I want to lose

Can I achieve both at the same time? If so, how?

Thanks in advance
KJ
 

suited

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2008
Messages
7,545
Reaction score
3,394
Originally Posted by KayJay85
I am 6'2" and 180 and I am trying to balance 2 goals which appear to be conflicting:
- I want to increase my strength and was going to use the Starting Strength routine I have seen posted here
- Despite my weight I have a tummy roll which I want to lose

Can I achieve both at the same time? If so, how?

Thanks in advance
KJ


Not to any meaningful degree unless 1) you're new to lifting (in that case, you can experience strength gains while losing weight for a short period of time) or 2) you're using anabolic steroids.
 

jarude

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
4,774
Reaction score
659
Originally Posted by suited
Not to any meaningful degree unless 1) you're new to lifting (in that case, you can experience strength gains while losing weight for a short period of time) or 2) you're using anabolic steroids.

This is 100% utterly and completely wrong. Assuming you're dieting correctly, and lifting at an appropriate intensity/volume level, you can gain strength while losing fat.

You won't be putting on size, but if you want to lean out and increase your numbers, this is definitely possible. I want to re-iterate that what the previous poster said is wrong. Not because I want to be right and fuck everything else, but because its possible.

Make sure you regulate your intensity. Find what works for you - I found I was only able to do SS until a certain point, then everything stalled. I have currently been leaning out and increasing all my lifts using ironaddict's simple power-based routine. If you're serious about leaning out and getting stronger, go to ironaddicts.com and read up there about how to do it properly. Here, you're gonna get lots of people spitting bro-science.
 

asdf

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2009
Messages
810
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by jarude
This is 100% utterly and completely wrong. Assuming you're dieting correctly, and lifting at an appropriate intensity/volume level, you can gain strength while losing fat.

+32567
 

stylenooob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
57
Reaction score
0
Originally Posted by KayJay85
I am 6'2" and 180 and I am trying to balance 2 goals which appear to be conflicting:
- I want to increase my strength and was going to use the Starting Strength routine I have seen posted here
- Despite my weight I have a tummy roll which I want to lose

Can I achieve both at the same time? If so, how?

Thanks in advance
KJ

It's difficult to add muscle mass while losing fat. It's easier 1) the fatter you are, 2) the weaker you are, 3) the younger you are, 4) and the better your recovery (more sleep/less stress). You can also get a little stronger without gaining mass, but that will top out.

At 6'2", 180, you are a lean dude, so if you have excess fat you must have very little muscle development. Like the previous poster said, if you are new to strength training you can make some gains for a while w/o gaining weight. How long that burst lasts depends on the four factors above. But after that initial burst of gains you will have to make a choice between gaining strength and losing weight.
 

Egert

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2011
Messages
165
Reaction score
2
Originally Posted by jarude
This is 100% utterly and completely wrong. Assuming you're dieting correctly, and lifting at an appropriate intensity/volume level, you can gain strength while losing fat.
+1 to this.

I have lost around 13-14kg's (so about 30lbs) over a 2.5 month period while doing cardio and eating at a solid deficit. Now, as I've also done strength training meanwhile and continue doing this, I haven't seen any decline in strength.

And losing muscle with big calorie deficits is something you shouldn't worry about unless your bodyfat percentage is in single digits and you have serious muscle mass.

So,

Keep lifting
Eat at a deficit
Rinse
Repeat
Profit!?
 

Cary Grant

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2008
Messages
9,674
Reaction score
411
Jarude is correct. The process (often referred to as a re-composition/re-comp) is not one for those seeking immediate gratification but is also generally simpler to maintain. Lean mass CAN be added, but slowly and only if you get the balance of diet versus workout just right, and this is where most fail- a true recomp won't happen with a casual approach to your diet and workout.
 

Prada_Ferragamo

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2008
Messages
6,551
Reaction score
106
Dieting is the most important thing. I see all the time people eating bag of chips and drinking a pop after a "workout", and they complain that they can't loose the weight.
 

JesseJB

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
1,351
Reaction score
3
If youre already pretty strong, work out regularly and are generally happy with your muscle mass but like the OP have the "pooch", would upping your cardio time/intensity and just cutting back on the beerz be a simple way to lose it?
 

asdf

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2009
Messages
810
Reaction score
3
Originally Posted by JesseJB
If youre already pretty strong, work out regularly and are generally happy with your muscle mass but like the OP have the "pooch", would upping your cardio time/intensity and just cutting back on the beerz be a simple way to lose it?

Yes, do complexes and/or intervals.

Careful when you say "time;" long/slow cardio is not the best way to go about this. It has its place, but intensity/frequency are generally the things you want to increase in the situation you describe.

And yes, diet is about 80% of the answer to 90% of these types of questions.
 

aizan

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
736
Reaction score
6
lift weights a lot (not much cardio) and eat maintenance calories (no more, no less)?
 

jarude

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
4,774
Reaction score
659
Originally Posted by JesseJB
If youre already pretty strong, work out regularly and are generally happy with your muscle mass but like the OP have the "pooch", would upping your cardio time/intensity and just cutting back on the beerz be a simple way to lose it?

dieting would probably be the better way, unless you really like cardio. fat loss is mostly a function of diet rather than cardio, like others have said, but either way would work. i'd rather diet down and have my gains progress better rather than add in more work.
 

Cary Grant

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2008
Messages
9,674
Reaction score
411
Originally Posted by jarude
dieting would probably be the better way, unless you really like cardio. fat loss is mostly a function of diet rather than cardio, like others have said, but either way would work. i'd rather diet down and have my gains progress better rather than add in more work.

Until you get to be old like me in which case you have to do both...
 

dimshum

Senior Member
Joined
May 7, 2005
Messages
228
Reaction score
0
Eating at a continuous deficit over the long run will only give you neural gains in strength (muscular efficiency). You won't gain mass.

What you CAN do in order to gain mass requires much more structure and dedication to your diet. You can structure it like so:

Workout Days (strength training): 125% Maintenance Cal (high-carb)
Non Workout Days (minimal cardio): 50-75% Maintenance Cal (low-carb)

This works when you're doing less volume (less sets/reps, probably 2-3x5-6) and less frequent workouts. Keep pushing the intensity. Look for pyramid training for further reference.

Also, do NOT do much if any HIIT while on this protocol. This will put undue stress on your body and may simply just stall fat-loss. I repeat, do NOT engage in HIIT during this regimen, you will do more harm than good.

All in all, keep in mind that this is a slow process. Weight may not change at all, but if you notice a change in body composition and keep certain measures in check (how your pants fit), you'll know you're progressing.
 

jarude

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
4,774
Reaction score
659
Originally Posted by dimshum
Eating at a continuous deficit over the long run will only give you neural gains in strength (muscular efficiency). You won't gain mass.


This is pretty awesome though. Lean out, get strong as fuck, then go back on a surplus and start mega volume.

I dunno about going down to 50% maintenance calories on an off-day. as far as recomps go, that's pretty aggressive
 

Featured Sponsor

What's your favorite pair of shoes to wear with jeans? (Choose two)

  • Boots (Chelsea, Chukkas, Balmorals, etc.)

  • Loafers

  • Work boots (Red Wing, Wolverine, etc.)

  • Monk strap shoes

  • Oxford / Derby shoes

  • Sneakers


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
427,198
Messages
9,194,001
Members
193,103
Latest member
harleyeely

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Top