French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by poorsod, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    I meant known by guys like me..:)
     


  2. Romain

    Romain Senior member

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    Dirnelli, how would you compare di Fiore to Suzuki, or to the other tailors you've met?
     


  3. SeamasterLux

    SeamasterLux Senior member

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    The question is not addressed to me but I'd definitely say that Di Fiore has a more classic cut compared to the others that are more contemporary. The others are also more technically skilled in terms of movement freedom optimization (if that means anything).
     


  4. Romain

    Romain Senior member

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    Thanks for your answer! I see what you mean.
     


  5. dirnelli

    dirnelli Senior member

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    I disagree with SeamasterLux: I'm not sure that, in terms of freedom of movement, Di Fiore has anything less compared to other currently hyped italian tailors, From speaking to di Fiore, I find that both he and Camps de Luca have a soft tailoring (italian) approach to movement (think Claude Francois dancing in his CdL suit, arms flailing).

    Let's not confuse soft tailoring and soft shoulders. The French tailors do structured roped shoulders, but the best ones like CdL, Cifo and Di Fiore (all italian) interpret the roped shoulder within a very fluid jacket, which is what's so amazing -- the combination of structured look and light tailoring. Lesser French tailors have a structured look, but also a rigid feel. However, the top tailors combine the best of both worlds: the chiselled look of Savile Row with the ease of movement of the Italians. That's the French touch, described by Marc de Luca in my video interview at the start of this thread.

    Having not met Suzuki yet (I examined a customer's jacket, amazing, but never met its maker), I will not comment too much. My sense is that he is a pure product of the Camps, Smalto, Gonzales & Di Fiore tradition.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014


  6. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    LV and Hermès were pretty much the only brands doing well in JP during the height of the recession, anyone that sees saturation just does not understand the Japanese mindset when it comes to clothing. Lots of them will just purchase a few pricey items, wear them to the ground, then start again with new, in fashion, garments.
     


  7. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

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    Actually thats how my ethos. It is such a waste if your suits and shoes are only in the waldrobe without being worn probably.

    Wear it like you dont care.
     


  8. poorsod

    poorsod Senior member

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    I've tried on a vintage Smalto, made for someone else, and it felt like armor - very stiff and sculpted shoulders. Quite the opposite to what I have from NSM. Was the Smalto I tried atypical?
     


  9. dirnelli

    dirnelli Senior member

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    Vintage Cifo, vintage Rousseau can also feel stiff by today's standards.
    Djay feels stiff. Evzeline looks stiff. Guilson feels stiff. Diagne is super soft. Smalto falls probably in the middle today.
    Basically, tailoring has evolved, a Cifo from 1981 ( I just sold three of mine) feels nothing like a Cifo today. CdL however was already known for ease of movement in the 60's.
     


  10. Kuro

    Kuro Senior member

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    ^what about Charvet (in terms of stiffness)?
     


  11. 89826

    89826 Senior member

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    Suggestions for finding a new La Forestiere jacket before it is too late? Other than ebay. Perhaps it already is too late.
     


  12. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

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    Do you know what the stiffness comes from? Is it the kind of canvas used? The way the padding is done? The cut? The amount of stuff in the shoulder?
     


  13. SeamasterLux

    SeamasterLux Senior member

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    Good question. You'd have to ask RJMan about that.

    I would expect that it's not as Camps and Cifo.

    On the contrary of what Dirnelli said, I actually tried on a Di Fiore sportcoat (slightly too large for me though) and I didn't feel like it gave me the same sense of freedom of movement. Anyway, I don't really care since I won't give any of my business to Mr. Di Fiore :)

    I'm more wondering about Suzuki or Cifo for a next order. Not the same price though but both are interesting.
     


  14. lasbar

    lasbar Senior member

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    We need him back.
     


  15. dirnelli

    dirnelli Senior member

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