Fountain Pen

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by bearsfan172, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. singlechange

    singlechange Senior member

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    I've been using and collecting fountain pens for about five years now. If I had to do it all over again, I think I would use Richard Binder as my information source. He is a very respected fountain pen collector and repairs pens too and has a blog and sales inventory of vintage and modern pens. At the first day of every month he puts out a tray of nice pens for sale and they are gone in hours of showing. But the best thing about getting a pen from Richard is that he services and adjusts and tunes each pen to bring out its inherent characteristics, whether new or vintage. My current fav is not a Binderized pen but I did learn so much from him to get to the point where I knew what I really wanted and really liked.
     


  2. derekzee

    derekzee Well-Known Member

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    vintage sheaffers are good value.
     


  3. JayJay

    JayJay Senior member

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    I've been using and collecting fountain pens for about five years now. If I had to do it all over again, I think I would use Richard Binder as my information source. He is a very respected fountain pen collector and repairs pens too and has a blog and sales inventory of vintage and modern pens. At the first day of every month he puts out a tray of nice pens for sale and they are gone in hours of showing. But the best thing about getting a pen from Richard is that he services and adjusts and tunes each pen to bring out its inherent characteristics, whether new or vintage. My current fav is not a Binderized pen but I did learn so much from him to get to the point where I knew what I really wanted and really liked.
    I bought a pen from him. He's top notch.
     


  4. chobochobo

    chobochobo Rubber Chicken Dubiously Honored Moderator

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    I've been using and collecting fountain pens for about five years now. If I had to do it all over again, I think I would use Richard Binder as my information source. He is a very respected fountain pen collector and repairs pens too and has a blog and sales inventory of vintage and modern pens. At the first day of every month he puts out a tray of nice pens for sale and they are gone in hours of showing. But the best thing about getting a pen from Richard is that he services and adjusts and tunes each pen to bring out its inherent characteristics, whether new or vintage. My current fav is not a Binderized pen but I did learn so much from him to get to the point where I knew what I really wanted and really liked.

    Richard Binder is one of many good sellers but there others I would go to first. Go and have a look at pentrace for a less formal pen forum. They have quite an active selling forum and you can pick up all sorts of pens there, new/ vintage or pricey/ cheap.

    Regarding my small collection of Eversharp Coronets, it just seemed to happen by accident...
     


  5. ducatisteve

    ducatisteve Member

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    I have a Lamy Al-Star (the aluminum version of the plastic Safari recommended earlier), and although it worked fine when I purchased it, a few months later it began skipping like crazy. I tried every cleaning trick in the book and after nothing worked, it now sits in a shoebox, unused. I do also have a Lamy 2000 that works perfectly.

    If I were to recommend a brand for you to start out with (in your budget), it would definitely be a Waterman. You can pick up a Phileas or Graduate model for well under $50 and have a smooth writing, fun pen. But you have to remember that half of the writing pleasure comes from writing on good paper, so head to your local B&N or Target to pick up a Moleskine or Rhodia notebook.
     


  6. chobochobo

    chobochobo Rubber Chicken Dubiously Honored Moderator

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    I found moleskin to be fountain pen unfriendly
     


  7. hansonho

    hansonho Member

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    Try one of these:

    [​IMG]

    Seriously though, depending on your writing style - the Heroes are cheap and cheerful.


    WOW! those look great what pens?
     


  8. hamish5178

    hamish5178 Senior member

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    I found moleskin to be fountain pen unfriendly

    That would, of course, depend on what ink you are using. I have no bleeding (or feathering) issues with my Moleskine and Pelikan ink.
     


  9. Bentley

    Bentley Senior member

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    I found moleskin to be fountain pen unfriendly

    +1
     


  10. Bentley

    Bentley Senior member

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    Never knew there were so many fountain pen enthusiasts here on SF.

    This is awesome!

    [​IMG]
     


  11. Rosencrantz1

    Rosencrantz1 Active Member

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    When I was looking at fountain pens in the past I found myself being continually advised to grab the Lamy Safari. You can use it with a cartridge to start out and get a feel of the style, then later on grab a converter nib to get used to filling it yourself. It's pretty darn cheap, to boot.

    +1 on the Lamy Safari. My father is a fountain pen collector, with pens ranging from $5 cheapos to vintage, solid gold Watermans and brand-new, top-of-the-line Mont Blancs. He constantly "complains" how frustrating it is that the $25 Lamy Safari writes so well at such a reasonable price.

    It's certainly not a formal looking pen, but as a starter fountain pen, I think it's hard to beat.

    Go to a stationary store that carries them and try out some different nib sizes. Personally, I prefer a fine nib, but many folks like a medium nib, especially if it is their only pen.

    Finally, if I may, I recommend a blue-black ink (as opposed to plain black). Nice stuff!

    Good luck!
     


  12. bearsfan172

    bearsfan172 Senior member

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    Never knew there were so many fountain pen enthusiasts here on SF.

    This is awesome!

    [​IMG]


    You're surprised? I was sort of just assuming that there would be plenty of fountain pen people on here when I made this post... and I'm certainly not surprised that there are

    Go to a stationary store that carries them and try out some different nib sizes. Personally, I prefer a fine nib, but many folks like a medium nib, especially if it is their only pen.

    Finally, if I may, I recommend a blue-black ink (as opposed to plain black). Nice stuff!

    Good luck!


    I will go and try out some different sizes. Any reason for the opinion on the blue-black over the black? Do you just like it better. I guess the color of the ink wasn't something I had even thought about.

    And I've heard some talk of what papers is best to write on. Any other opinions on what works the best with fountain pens?
     


  13. Rosencrantz1

    Rosencrantz1 Active Member

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    Blue-black is just a personal preference. Traditionally, it was advantageous to use a non-black ink, because it would prove that a signature was real, and not just a photocopy. With the advent of color copying and printing, this doesn't really hold any more.

    There are many ink options out there, even more if/when you move to filling from a bottle (as opposed to cartridges).
     


  14. mdp0430

    mdp0430 Senior member

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    Another Parker alternative would be a Centennial... I like their size.

    +1 re: Richard Binder, there are also others...

    The "problem" you're going to have to get used to is the ink. You're probably used to writing with a roller ball or ball point and not having to worry about the ink washing away if it comes in contact with liquid. Most inks for fountain pens will do just that. The ink washes right away with just the slightest contact of water (e.g. Waterman Florida Blue). Not a good thing if you're addressing and mailing an envelope on a rainy day...

    I suggest that you do some research over at Fountain Pen Network and go with inks that are known to be water resistant. Personally, I use "bulletproof" inks for all my writing, including endorsing checks...

    Welcome to fountain pens, next will be watches, then 2-channel audio, maybe a muscle car afterwards?
     


  15. bearsfan172

    bearsfan172 Senior member

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    Welcome to fountain pens, next will be watches, then 2-channel audio, maybe a muscle car afterwards?

    HA. I already have a nice turntable driven system with some damn expensive speakers, and a 1971 corvette. I'm trying to avoid the watches as long as possible... although theres this one Bulgari that has been catching my eye a lot lately....
     


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