for all you nycers

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by discostu004, Apr 28, 2005.

  1. discostu004

    discostu004 Affiliate vendor

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    just curious, housing seems ridiculous (stayed w/ a friend about 5 years ago and he had a small place for $3,300/month. 3,300/month here where i live would get you a 6,000 sq ft place, if not more since we pay a lot less than that and have an acre of land. do your jobs pay you that much more that the net difference is about the same as what i'd make in a similar job here in tx?
     


  2. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    jobs pay more, but not enough more. everything seems to be more expensive here than in the middle of the country - parking, babysitters, food.
     


  3. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    The average Manhattan salary is way above the national average, but not to the extent that housing cost exceeds the average.  The problem is that the average salary is pulled significantly up by those few (bankers, law partners, etc.) who make an astronomical amount while the high housing costs are spread pretty evenly across all income levels. The percentage of income that some lower-wage people here devote to their housing is staggering, well over 50% in many cases.

    dan
     


  4. itzamazing

    itzamazing Senior member

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    I recall a recent study where the average person in Manhattan makes almost $2000 a week, far above the national average. It is true that a few powerhouse fields tend to screw it up for everyone so to speak. There's also a lot of lower level service jobs that tend to drag the citywide average down (I believe its around 40k).

    I don't think most jobs pay that much more, but you are paying for the experience that is NYC. Some people are ultra obsessed with having an address on Central Park West or living in a zip code where people would say, wow, you live there.

    I'd say that $3300 is far from the norm here. Whenever real estate statistics are calculated it only includes Manhattan south of East 96th/West 116th...there's a whole city here besides that area, and certainly not the ghettos. The people who are spending $2700 a month on a 1 bedroom are a minority. If you want to live in a luxury rental in Chelsea, sure, but you can certainly find something for less. If you live in Brooklyn or *gasp* Queens, its certainly doable. Also, one of the important things to remember is that you do not need a car here, so you will save on car insurance/payments. All you need is a $76 Metrocard unless you will only take cabs. People will rent a 2 bedroom apt and put 4 people in it, hold onto rent controlled apts forever
     


  5. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    How much would a luxury one bed room apartment cost you in NYC near the lincoln center?
     


  6. itzamazing

    itzamazing Senior member

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    That's a hot area these days...well the entire Upper West Side is. I'd say a luxury 1 bedroom would run between $3000-$4000 in one of the newer buildings. A friend of mine is renting in the west 80s and paying $3800 for a 1 bedroom. You could probably find something in the upper $2000s though. Note that these prices are for luxury apartments only. The Time Warner Center has really added a premium to apts on the lower Upper West Side (which includes Lincoln Center).
     


  7. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    I don't understand the numbered streets. Can you give me a dummies version of NYC? Which numbers are bad, which are good? I'm talking downtown core.
     


  8. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    The average apartment price in NYC is now over $1mm.
     


  9. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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  10. discostu004

    discostu004 Affiliate vendor

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    yeah, it's the regular guys that i can't see affording it. the policemen, garbage men etc, how the hell can they afford it? i figure i make more than them and i wouldn't be able to afford it there
     


  11. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    alot of the cops and firemen live near where I do, in the suburbs
     


  12. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    In Manhattan, roughly speaking, avenues run north/south (the length of the island), while streets runs east/west (the width of island). Broadway cuts across the island on the diagonal, and runs from northwest to southeast. Avenues are numbered starting on the east side and progress numerically as you go west. So First Avenue is the eastern-most avenue (parallelling the East River), while 12th Ave. runs up the west side of the island (parallelling the Hudson). The numbered streets start at Houston Street and go higher as you go north. Below Houston (the older part of the city, containing the Lower East side, Little Italy, Soho, Chinatown, Tribecca and the Financial district) all streets are named & you'll need a map unless you know where you're going [​IMG]
     


  13. mack11211

    mack11211 Senior member

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    It's very simple. Â Odd numbered streets are bad, even numbered streets are good. Below Houston, where the numbered streets end, the streets are good while the avenues are bad. Â Any thing without 'street' or 'avenue' behind it, e.g. The Bowery or Broadway, should be avoided entirely. If you have any other questions, just ask [​IMG]
     


  14. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I don't understand the numbered streets. Can you give me a dummies version of NYC? Which numbers are bad, which are good? I'm talking downtown core.
    It's very simple. Odd numbered streets are bad, even numbered streets are good. Below Houston, where the numbered streets end, the streets are good while the avenues are bad. Any thing without 'street' or 'avenue' behind it, e.g. The Bowery or Broadway, should be avoided entirely. If you have any other questions, just ask [​IMG]
    Why, that's just...just stupid. (Not that SoFLA is any better instead of street numbers or avenues we go by neighborhoods... [​IMG] ) Jon.
     


  15. itzamazing

    itzamazing Senior member

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    It's not that certain numbers are bad or good. I certainly don't mean to inject race into this discussion, but here goes....96th st was once commonly known as the Mason Dixon line of NYC. Manhattan is a very segregated (much more than in the South I've found) and the brown people lived north of 96th, so realtors in their marketing excluded this part of the Manhattan as they felt that anyone desirable (read - with money) would not want to live in the area. Thus, every available statstic complied by the big real estate firms is careful, even to this day, to point out that the numbers only apply to the areas south of e96th/w116th. It was even so bad that tourists were told if they ever got lost, never go above 96th. (The reason for 116th on the west side is because of Columbia U and the gentrification of Morningside Heights...fancy/marketing name for Harlem, LOL).

    These are mass generalizations of course and things have defintely changed..whites are now buying in Harlem, Washington Heights and Inwood. Now people (mainly white) are *discovering* these areas and calling them potential gems.
     


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