Foo shops for a Japanese knife

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mafoofan, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I don't have matt's experience, but I like my big epicurean board a lot (although they have several different lines now...mine was whatever was available a few years ago).

    I too think that bamboo feels too hard. I haven't seen any studies to say this, but I felt like it was dulling blades.
     
  2. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    End grain is the best.

    Long grain is fine.

    Plastic will have contamination problems and all those design junk is for decor. Bamboo is to hard.
     
  3. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Senior member

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    Plastic is fine, it's what they use in professional kitchens.
     
  4. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Sani-Tuffs strike me as very expensive. I've got some wholesale plastic/rubber boards that were a quarter of the price. However, they scratch very easily. The Sani-Tuffs apparently do so too, but maybe to a lesser extent.
     
  5. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Boos block end grain maple.

    For meat, something cheap that can go in the dish washer.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2013
  6. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    i have a big (and heavy) rubber board. It's nice.
     
  7. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

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    Walnut end grain I made myself (I do a bit of amateur wookworking) sort of like the Boardsmith boards: http://theboardsmith.com/
    Here's a pic.[​IMG]

    (Context: we compiled a cookbook for my brother when he got married a year ago so that's the only pic I already had online.)

    For chicken, etc., I have an Epicurean.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2013
  8. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I was turned on to softer wood boards by a friend recently. I like.
     
  9. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    I had been eyeing some of those Boardsmith boards. If I were going to get wood, I think it would be one of these. Some of them are striking. Plus, he makes them to order so he can add features if you want.

    [​IMG]

    The problem is that I am trying to get away from wood as I know I won't take care of it properly.

    But there is a new entrant. Apparently, this is what Japanese chefs really use with their $3000 fish knives.

    High-Soft Cutting Boards.

    I gather these are softer than Sani-Tuff and are what everyone in Japan uses.
     
  10. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    All you need to do, I think, is rub it with mineral oil occasionally.
     
  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    God that brick board is ugly.

    Any restaurant with a guy with a $3000 sushi knife is not using hi soft, which is basically the same thing as sani-tuff. They have different regulations there than we do here, and high end places will use a single piece of softer wood. Say like this:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Everyone tells me I'm supposed to scrub it down with salt, treat it with vinegar, etc., except, that is, for the people who tell me they are completely impossible to sanitize. I could keep using one for vegetables, I suppose.



    Maybe, but it is certainly striking. I guess it depends what kind of kitchen you are putting it into. Certainly it would look terrible in the picture below. But he does all kinds of stuff and can also use some exotic woods, if that's what you want. To a certain extent -- there's some stuff he won't do because he thinks it's technically unsound or bad for the knives -- you can design it and he will build it. Think of the possibilities for niggling over insignificant details that we all love so much.


    They certainly make a big deal about how magical these Hi-Soft boards are. They are some sort of vinyl instead of rubber. But, yeah, it kind of sounds like marketing blather to me.

    One of the problems I have with both Sani-Tuff and Hi-Soft is that they seem to come in only one color.
     
  13. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

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    Salt is the way they used to clean butcher's blocks, the huge freestanding ones that weigh a ton. I just make a salt paste and use that to scrub anything off my board. Mineral oil is great, but I usually melt a little chunk of beewax in with it, apply it with a rag, let it sit a few minutes, then buff it off. I got a big brick of beeswax from a farmer's market for just a few bucks.

    Or you can buy it already mixed. That's all Boos Board Cream is, mineral oil and beeswax. http://www.amazon.com/John-Boos-Ounce-Block-Beeswax/dp/B002HDT9FK
     
  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Boardsmith and Boos both make nice boards. There is no doubt about that. I have a boardsmith board and while it is nice, his customer service is awful. My board took like six months to arrive on a estimated 2 week wait, and he didn't communicate at all. I had written it off as a loss and one day it just showed up. Unlike some, I don't really like to fuss over details, so that isn't a pull for me. As I said above, though, I prefer softer boards.
     
  15. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    why are people focusing so much on cutting boards? Isn't it good enough to have one that won't damage your knives and is easy to clean and stays put. We have a few but I like the sani-tuff because it is big, stays put (heavy) and easy to clean. What am I missing? (My wife hates it because it is heavy.)
     

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