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Foo shops for a Japanese knife

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mafoofan, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Senior member

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    Purchased this knife around this time last year. 7" Haruyuki Gyuto. Holds it's edge well (despite getting treated like shit by my flatmates who used it on a slate and glass chopping board), super thin, easy to sharpen and looks pretty good.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2013
  2. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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  3. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Go someplace where you can handle the knives--the feel of the knives, the way they fit your hand, is just as important as anything else. Any of the normal high end brands will do just fine if you take good care of them--Wusthof, Shun, etc.

    In terms of types of knives, a chef's knife and a paring knife will take care of 99% of tasks. Perhaps throw in a bread knife, though there is no reason that needs to be a high end knife--I have a Victorionox bread knife that works great.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2013
  4. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Holy cow!! I can't believe I missed this thread, though it was disappointing for a foo threak.
    I bought the Sabatier deadstock carbon steel knives (chef and parer) and have been enjoying them. I am sure I am under-skilled to use them, but they work well, which is all I can hope for.

    Attempts to keep them pristine long-ago failed and they are now black as matt's heart. Less to worry about.
     
  5. Kai

    Kai Senior member

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  6. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Senior member

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    I've got a carbon steel Nakiri which I've been using a lot lately. Gets dirty quick but nothing a clean can't handle. I just make sure none of my flatmates use it otherwise it'll get completely trashed in a couple days.

    I highly recommend anyone in the UK purchase from these guys: http://cuttingedgeknives.co.uk

    Good range of stock and they're great at responding to messages via email or social media.
     
  7. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    My chef's knife is actually in pretty good shape since I am the only one who uses it and I ma pretty careful to dry it constantly while using it. My wife has used the paring knife and she has let it stay wet and rust. It doesn't seem to affect anything other than the appearance, though. I can no longer remember the website that was selling these but if anyone is interested in them, it is worth a look. They are reasonably priced and quite beautiful in an old-fashioned lo-tech way; definitely nothing like the fancy Asian knives people are looking at.
     
  8. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    I'm working at home and had a couple of minutes, so I pulled out some of my carbon steel knives. The top one is Japanese, the others are deadstock Sabatier. from before WWII. The one with the pale wooden handle is from before WWI. The handle is hand-carved and the rivets are hand-hammered. Most of them need some cleaning because I don't use them that often (don't think I've ever used that demi-hachette at the bottom, but it's very cool).
    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    3rd, 4th and 6th from the top look like the nogents that I have, though in slightly different sizes (I have a smaller paring knife (3"), a 10" chef and a 13" slicer.
     
  10. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    Where did you get yours? Mine came from lee valley tools many years ago. One of their buyers found a trove when a couple of the sabatier companies were reorganizing. I don't think any of those cost more than $40.
     
  11. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    http://thebestthings.com/knives/sabatier_nogent.htm

    Prices are much higher than what you paid, but still reasonable. I have also read reports that some of the edges sharpening can be spotty, but mine we all pretty good. I am tempted, for no reason, to get a 12" and maybe also a 4" paring knife, but I really have no need.
     
  12. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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  13. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Are you getting one of the cleavers?
     
  14. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Senior member

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    This guy makes really high quality cutlery, would love to own one of his pieces: http://www.cartercutlery.com/

    Sign up to his mailing list for discounts in the welcome campaign, and check out his YT videos, there are some showing how he makes the knives.

    I think my next purchase is going to be a Deba, I need a beater knife that isn't likely to chip.
     
  15. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    i've got 2 cleavers and that demi-hachette now. haven't used any of them in at least 3 years. cool objects though.
     
  16. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  17. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I imagine the two-handed ones take some practice to swing without hurting yourself. But when you get good, you will look like this:

    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
  18. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    what does one do with it that can't be done by what you already have?
     
  19. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    having perfected the perfectly cubed brunoise, matt is now moving on to hacked bits.
     
  20. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Since you asked . . . a kitchen axe is better suited for off-the-block aerial cuts.


    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013

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