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Fly fishing

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by lefty, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    It wasn't the Davidson. Pigeon, maybe?

    lefty
     
  2. rpm13

    rpm13 New Member

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    Plenty of steelhead and pacific salmon in upstate NY, the Lake Ontario region, some stocked and some natural production.......google salmon river.....I've fished there for the last 20 years........some Atlantic salmon in the summer, some not a lot, but enough to keep a fly fisherman's interest..........
     
  3. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    I thought they really couldn't keep a natural population going?

    lefty
     
  4. Cold Iron

    Cold Iron Senior member

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    rpm13 welcome to SF, first post and it is on Salmon fishing nicely done! I for one don't have to google salmon river, who can ever forget the Pulaski fly? Just need a piece of white T-shirt on it and fit right in with the shoulder to shoulder crowds starting in September.


    [​IMG]


    Sorry couldn't resist. Although snagging has been outlawed on the Salmon for awhile now it is still common. Actually it is too common every where IMO. All of the Great Lakes have silver, king and steelhead in them now. Lake Superior is the largest and deepest of the Great Lakes so you would think it has the largest fish. But because it is so deep and cold it is a fairly sterile fishery. Lake Michigan however is very fertile in comparison and a much better fishery.

    Maybe the Pigeon, there are something like 4,000 miles of trout streams in Western NC. Some are much better than others. I checked and sadly there still only 3 C&R streams in NC. The Davidson is one of them and the better of the 3 IMO. During the summer there are a lot of options and many miles to fish. There was mining in much of the area to the North of Asheville (still is) and when they were forced to clean up some of the streams with fish kills they caused many of them decided to stock muskie instead. You don't normally think muskie in the South, but they are there and were native at one time in many of the streams and lakes. I much prefer fishing to the West for trout however. There are at least 2 decent streams 15 minutes from Asheville to the West.
     
  5. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    That's a nasty looking hook. Lots of videos on youtube of guys standing in rivers snagging salmon.

    What's everyone's opinion on barbed vs. barbless? There seems to be some evidence that barbed is easier on the fish, though I'm not sure I buy the "stiletto" effect.

    lefty
     
  6. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    I've not looked in to the evidence myself but tend to crush most of the barbs on my flys, I find it a lot easier to de-hook and as I C&R most of the time I really do try and get them back in the water asap, and crushed barbs helps that. I landed a nice little 25cm Rainbow last night that I hadn't crushed the barb on and it was a lot harder to get the hook out. That being said when fishing smaller/twiggy water for small fish I find they also throw the hooks a lot easier than bigger less energetic fish do with crushed barbs.
     
  7. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    I just do it as habit. Crimp then file. I fished a lot of barbless C&R where the wardens would walk around with cotton balls. They test your hook and if anything caught ... thanks for coming out, here's you massive fine.

    Quote:


    lefty
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2012
  8. Cold Iron

    Cold Iron Senior member

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    I have respect for CO's but that cotton ball test would test my patience, and ability to remain silent. I could see a young buck warden that was overzealous but damn...

    Have you ever noticed that when you go to crush the barb on the hook the odds of the point breaking off greatly increase depending on several factors? If your on a stream late in the day a long ways from the vehicle, in the middle of a hatch and have been catching fish on almost every cast, on only a certain size and pattern that they have keyed in on, and all your flies have been torn apart to just a couple of hanging threads, and you pull the last matching fly out that you have on you out of the fly box... It will need crimped and you stand a better than 50% chance of breaking it off.

    Sometimes up to an hour after I've released a fish in a pool or pond I will see one float belly up to the top. Despite doing everything "right", it happens. I tend to agree with the article although I use barbless more times than not for easy release. Even long distance releases [​IMG], although we all try to keep tight lines. But have seen many kills in the middle of summer especially freestone streams with low oxygen and using midges on 22/24 hooks and a frog hair diameter tippet. You can't horse them in and it exhausts them badly bringing them in.

    I'm close to Wi. and work with a lot of people from there. I don't fish the driftless area of Wi. because I have enough trout to fish where I live. Many of those from Wi. call the Wi. DNR Do Nothing Right boys. But to me this article is one more example of the many wildlife practices that they do in Wi. which is right. Thanks for the information.
     
  9. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Yeah. Fighting a fish for too long in the heat of summer on a freestone is pretty much going to kill it.

    And yes, I've broken more hooks at inopportune moments that I'd care to remember. Also watched nets float away. Pulled the last 6" of tippet off when I was sure I put a new spool in my bag. Left reels at home. Rods in the bush. Etc ... etc ... etc. It's a miracle I catch a fish once in a while.

    Here's a very interesting article on stocking. In 1974, Montana stopped stocking on streams that could sustain a wild population. The wild fish bloomed.

    http://fwp.mt.gov/mtoutdoors/HTML/articles/2004/DickVincent.htm

    lefty
     
  10. rpm13

    rpm13 New Member

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    I remember the PULASKI "FLY", could not believe my eyes, guy in the sport shop said that this was the only way to catch the salmon, tried it once, said to myself I'd rather go fish less......every once in a while you find one especially after high cfs........Luckily one of the guys in my TU club fished there a lot and I learned much from him. Love passing on my knowledge of the sport. I usually go 3 to 4 times a year, mostly for steelhead now.
     
  11. Cold Iron

    Cold Iron Senior member

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    That is a great article and I wish more States would be willing to do the same. It does go against the conventional grain of thought.... I also strongly agree with the statement at the end of the article too which says habit improvement is one of the most important things that needs to be done.

    I had a feeling you felt that way [​IMG] Same thing happened to me when I tried it with a friend many years ago. Plus all the "fisherman" on the water, I'd prefer to fish all day and not see anyone else. People can say what they want about TU but one of the main things they do is stream improvement, among other things. IIRC it was TU that finally put on the pressure that got the snagging outlawed.
     
  12. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Not fishing, but nonetheless cool...



    This is fishing - wait for the end.


    Just a pretty shot.

    [​IMG]

    lefty
     
  13. mikeman

    mikeman Senior member

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    Have any of you been on a guided trip? I have been fly fishing for a couple years now. However, I feel like I really lack some basic skills. My cast is great, but I think I could use a good guide to kind of coach me through some stuff for the day. After a guided trip, I would at least know that Im doing things correctly.
     
  14. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    I will pick a guide for a day if I'm in a new area and want to get the "lay of the land" as quickly as possible. I've used some great guys and a few not so - once I had to fire a guy on the spot - and for the most part I usually pick up a thing or two. If you're tell them you're there to clean up your cast or line management and a fish or two is bonus you should be in great shape. Most guys overestimate their skills and have a shitty time.

    Where are you located?

    lefty
     
  15. mikeman

    mikeman Senior member

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    Good to know. When trout fishing, which is not that often, I freak out about using the right/ wrong fly, and how Im fishing it.

    How did you get "good" at choosing the right fly? I know the whole "match the hatch" bit, but there is just so much to learn!

    I'm located in Southeastern Wisconsin.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  16. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    I tend to take a bit of time out before I hit the water to see what's around. If not much is showing on the streams rustle a few bushes and this often gets a few of the duns that are about to turn in to spinners to come out. From then I pick something as close as possible. If in doubt I just use a generalist dry in summer, the good old Royal Wulff always works well for this in various sizes along with stimulator patterns. Nymphs are a lot easier I find, well here in Australia anyway the fish dont seem to be too fussy on colour, more size and having it weighted properly to get at the right level.

    I've not used a guide but me and my wife (and baby by then) are planning our wedding anniversary next October in Tasmania, the best trout fishing in the country and as I'll only have 1 day's fishing, I will look at getting a guide for at least half a day to show me around.
     
  17. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    A good fly shop is your best friend. Walk in with your fly box and ask what they recommend. Drop $25 or so on flies for their advice.

    Find a local group or a FF forum and read. Then hit the water and observe and experiment. If fish are breaking the surface they're eating something - what's flying around you? What's floating by?

    A good guide for 1/2 day can be invaluable.

    lefty
     
  18. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Depending on where you're located and what you're fishing for a guide can really help. I'm a great believer in leveraging your skill by studying with a master any time you can.

    For instance, if you're in the Pacific NW in March the fly shop in Sandy Oregon has a whole day guided trip for steelhead (fresh chrome) on the Sandy and maybe even the Clackamas for $250.00. I'm very very tempted even though I've been fly fishing for steelhead close on to 40 years and Oregon is where I live. In fact, I live on one of the great steelhead rivers--the Deschutes.

    But fishing for steelhead for 40 years is not the same a living for and with them 24/7--that's what you get with a guide.
     
  19. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    That's a hell of a deal. Most PNW steelhead guides start at $450/dy.

    lefty
     
  20. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013

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