Flusser Books

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by smartie_addict, Apr 20, 2005.

  1. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    What's wrong with that? Â [​IMG] Â Seriously, I like those pictures because the guys in them are, for the most part, well dressed.
    I agree with the first half of this statement, but disagree with the second. Â Yes, the books are biased. Â But all clothing books are biased in favor of the author's tastes. Â And Flusser's and Roetzel's books are, despite their biases, packed to the gills with objective information.
    So far as I can guess, yes.
     
  2. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    If Roetzel had a disclaimer along the lines of: Material presented in this book is biased toward whatever brand paid me and toward British clothing then things would be clearer. Whenever I read clothes books I wonder if rules/advices are general or are applicable only in the US/UK/etc. for instance. I think that Italian or some French (e.g. Berluti) shoe makers would have a point of view on shoes very different from Roetzel's/Church's. Black oxfords are the shoes to some people but not to everybody, this should be explicitly stated somewhere. Mathieu
     
  3. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    That's potentially a huge problem, although none of us really know it's true.
    This is a totally different issue. Â The author is either stating his taste, or stating a practice that is prevelant in certain enviornments, or both. Â I think the reader deserves more credit for being able to understand this, and decide for himself if he wants to buy the book, and if and when he wants to follow its advice. Â Roetzel's book is pretty clearly about a certain kind of essentially Anglo style. Â He's not obligated to say, at every turn, "And here's what I would have said had I written a different book." Let some Frenchman write his own book about why purple Berlutis with pointy toes and Frankenstein stitching on the vamp are superior to black cap toes, and let the reading public decide which is more to their taste.
     
  4. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    What I mean is that it would be nice to have a book presenting several points of view, the various silhouettes, various kinds of shoes, etc.
     
  5. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Yes it would. Expensive to produce, therefore expensive cover price, and I would guess a limited market. It's hard to imagine anyone making a go of it. But like you, I would like to see it, too.
     
  6. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

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    (alchimiste @ April 20 2005,22:32) What I mean is that it would be nice to have a book presenting several points of view, the various silhouettes, various kinds of shoes, etc.
    Yes it would. Â Expensive to produce, therefore expensive cover price, and I would guess a limited market. Â It's hard to imagine anyone making a go of it. Â But like you, I would like to see it, too.
    Shall we collaborate?
     
  7. Fritz

    Fritz Senior member

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    The Roetzel book actually strikes me as very German. It does not have a lot of German products in it, except for this shirtmaker's picture I can't think of any right now. But there is a certain part of the German upper-middle class that is drawn to the Anglo look that Roetzel proposes. Tweed coats, Barbour jackets, English shoes etc. are very popular among them. If you can imagine such a thing as German preppies, that's the kind of people I am talking about. They like Polo Ralph Lauren, too. Not English per se, but drawing on the look.
    I also get the feeling that Roetzel likes and admires Italian style, but hasn't really "connected" to it. This is also very German. We, if I may generalize a little, love Italy, but are also puzzled by it. BTW, Roetzel and Flusser get quoted a lot on the fora, there doesn't seem to be a book of similar status on Italian style, or am I missing something?

    Style and the Man must be the most thumbed-through book in my library. It has pretty much no pictures, but that only helped fuel my imagination. It was my first serious ressource for fine clothing, and it is dear to my heart.
     
  8. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    Isn't the tailor posing in front of summer weight material for suits also German?
     
  9. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    To my knowledge, there is not. I agree that it would be a great addition to the library.
     
  10. lionel

    lionel Well-Known Member

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    Very good point, but you forget the Timberland boat shoes in the description of the standard upper-class german citizen [​IMG] . Germans seem to admire England and its way of life. See the iconic "Rosamunde Pilcher" movies. All the implements of the english gentleman are represented (barbour, tweed jackets, huge castles). Only the cars remains german.
     
  11. maxnharry

    maxnharry Senior member

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    Roetzel's book was originally published in German and then translated into English. He has continued to write books for the German market, but there hasn't been one translated since.

    I really like his book. I enjoy the photos and think that there is good information inside. Like every author, Roetzel has his prejudices, but it is clearly an informative guide.
     
  12. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    With what would those Berlutis go well? [​IMG] Oh, you meant the purple ones...
     
  13. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Germans understanding the English, but not the Italians, is hardly surprising. The typical German, is, like the typical Englishman, more likely (in a statistical sense only, based on history and culture) to be rulebound and have a serious case of constipation than Italians, who actually seem to enjoy life quite a bit, have style icons who no one else can emulate, and thus don't, and realize that wearing button downs with a suit is just fine - it's only clothing, after all.
     
  14. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Those shoes are so old man. Where's the Frankenstein cut & stitch on the vamp?
     
  15. Fritz

    Fritz Senior member

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    Lionel is right, those Timberland are a must-have for every "well-to-do bachelor" as a good friend, female law-student, once told me. [​IMG] The shoes in question aren't really boat-shoes, the uppers are the same, but you need to have thick rubber soles with a profile, almost like hiking boots. At least where I live (min 150 mls away from the sea). Edit: chorse is right, the guy with the summer-fabrics is German. I just looked it up. But he is also the shirt-maker that I mentioned. He is called shirtmaker/ tailor. Which leads to obvious questions. But let's not go there now...
     

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